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Full-Text Articles in Law

Fiction 101: A Primer For Lawyers On How To Use Fiction Writing, Brian J. Foley, Ruth Anne Robbins Feb 2001

Fiction 101: A Primer For Lawyers On How To Use Fiction Writing, Brian J. Foley, Ruth Anne Robbins

Ruth Anne Robbins

This article talks about how to build a story in legal writing using fiction-writing concepts of character, conflict type and resolution.


Alice In Legal Wonderland: A Cross-Examination Of Gender, Race And Empire In Victorian Law And Literature, Kristin (Brandser) Kalsem Jan 2001

Alice In Legal Wonderland: A Cross-Examination Of Gender, Race And Empire In Victorian Law And Literature, Kristin (Brandser) Kalsem

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

Lewis Carroll's 1865 scene of a recalcitrant Alice in the courtroom, defying the court's authority as she grows (literally) into a large and threatening presence, dramatizes what was becoming an increasingly common Victorian spectacle: a woman questioning and critiquing the law and claiming a place for herself within its institutions. Women have played a significant (but much overlooked) role in legal history and, in this paper, I argue for the importance of examining various narratives of the past (including literary accounts) that explored women's relationship to the law.

Against the backdrop of several legal cases in which ...


Does Law And Literature Survive Lawyerland?, Sarah Krakoff Jan 2001

Does Law And Literature Survive Lawyerland?, Sarah Krakoff

Articles

No abstract provided.


Privacy And Power: Computer Databases And Metaphors For Information Privacy, Daniel J. Solove Jan 2001

Privacy And Power: Computer Databases And Metaphors For Information Privacy, Daniel J. Solove

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

Journalists, politicians, jurists, and legal academics often describe the privacy problem created by the collection and use of personal information through computer databases and the Internet with the metaphor of Big Brother - the totalitarian government portrayed in George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four. Professor Solove argues that this is the wrong metaphor. The Big Brother metaphor as well as much of the law that protects privacy emerges from a longstanding paradigm for conceptualizing privacy problems. Under this paradigm, privacy is invaded by uncovering one's hidden world, by surveillance, and by the disclosure of concealed information. The harm caused by such ...