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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Law

Good Faith: Balancing The Right To Manage With The Right To Represent, Suzanne Darrow-Kleinhaus Apr 2001

Good Faith: Balancing The Right To Manage With The Right To Represent, Suzanne Darrow-Kleinhaus

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Testing The Limits: Alcohol & Drug Testing For Offshore Employees, Brian Johnston, Tara Erskine Apr 2001

Testing The Limits: Alcohol & Drug Testing For Offshore Employees, Brian Johnston, Tara Erskine

Dalhousie Law Journal

The legal limits of drug and alcohol testing by employers in the Atlantic Canada offshore are not yet entirely clear. To shed light on where these limits may lie, the authors examine the relevant law in the United Kingdom and the United States, together with the law on testing in Canada generally and the applicable provisions of the Accord Acts.


Recent Case Developments, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 2001

Recent Case Developments, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

Recent case developments in Insurance Law in the years 2000 and 2001.


The Effects Of Partial Privatization Of Social Security Upon Private Pensions, Kathryn L. Moore Jan 2001

The Effects Of Partial Privatization Of Social Security Upon Private Pensions, Kathryn L. Moore

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

Social Security does not provide retirement income in a vacuum. Rather, commentators often refer to our national retirement income system as a three legged stool, with Social Security representing one of the legs and employer sponsored pension plans and individual savings representing the other two legs. Because changes in one leg of the stool are likely to have a direct impact on the other two legs, policymakers must not consider Social Security changes in isolation, but should take account of their effect on employer-sponsored pensions and individual savings. This Article analyzes how one of the most popular proposals, partial privatization, …


Mandatory Arbitration Of An Employee's Statutory Rights: Still A Controversial Issue Or Are We Beating The Proverbial Dead Horse - Penn V. Ryan's Family Steakhouse, Inc., Andrea L. Myers Jan 2001

Mandatory Arbitration Of An Employee's Statutory Rights: Still A Controversial Issue Or Are We Beating The Proverbial Dead Horse - Penn V. Ryan's Family Steakhouse, Inc., Andrea L. Myers

Journal of Dispute Resolution

Since the early 1980s, the Supreme Court has espoused a strong preference for arbitration in the employment setting. Despite this general preference, the Supreme Court has never clearly stated that mandatory arbitration of statutory rights is always reasonable. This omission has led to much controversy about whether this preference permits the mandatory arbitration of all statutory rights or only those that are amenable to arbitration as defined by the Supreme Court.