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Censorship Tsunami Spares College Media: To Protect Free Expression On Public Campuses, Lessons From The "College Hazelwood" Case, Richard J. Peltz-Steele Jan 2001

Censorship Tsunami Spares College Media: To Protect Free Expression On Public Campuses, Lessons From The "College Hazelwood" Case, Richard J. Peltz-Steele

Faculty Publications

Since the advent of journalism schools in the college academy, student publications have taken their place as a vital component of campus life. As counterparts to the Fourth Estate in the society at large, college journalists act as watchdogs on student government, ensuring that student money is wisely spent and student justice equitably administered. As an outpost of the Fourth Estate, college journalism serves all the public by monitoring the administration of higher education. In September 1999, a decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit threatened to radically distort the face of college journalism by rendering …


Common Schools And The Common Good: Reflections On The School-Choice Debate, Richard W. Garnett Jan 2001

Common Schools And The Common Good: Reflections On The School-Choice Debate, Richard W. Garnett

Journal Articles

Thank you very much for this timely and important discussion on school choice, religious faith, and the public good.

First things first—Steven Green is right: The Cleveland school-voucher case is headed for the Supreme Court. And I am afraid that Mr. Green is also correct when he observes that the question whether the First Amendment permits States to experiment with meaningful choice-based education reform will likely turn on Justice O'Connor's fine-tuned aesthetic reactions to the minutiae of Ohio's school-choice experiment.

Putting aside for now the particulars of the Cleveland case, though, I would like to propose for your consideration a …


Dispelling The Misconceptions Raised By The Davis Dissent, Joan E. Schaffner Jan 2001

Dispelling The Misconceptions Raised By The Davis Dissent, Joan E. Schaffner

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

This article argues that the Supreme Court’s majority opinion in Davis v. Monroe County Board of Education did not do enough to explicitly assuage the dissenters’ concerns and aims to do so itself. Davis permitted liability for school districts that purposely ignore instances of student-on-student sexual harassment that deprived a student of the opportunity for education. The three issues raised by the dissent were federalism, whether the conduct at issue is sexual harassment, and First Amendment concerns about the aggressor’s speech being protected. In response, I argue that the majority opinion does not violate federalism principles, the harassment qualifies as …