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2001

Common Law

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Articles 1 - 25 of 25

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Gate(Way)S Of Hell And Pathways To Purgatory: Eradicating Common Law Protections In The Newly Sculpted Character Evidence Rules Of The United Kingdom's 2003 Criminal Justice Act, Chris Chambers Goodman Oct 2001

The Gate(Way)S Of Hell And Pathways To Purgatory: Eradicating Common Law Protections In The Newly Sculpted Character Evidence Rules Of The United Kingdom's 2003 Criminal Justice Act, Chris Chambers Goodman

University of Miami Law Review

No abstract provided.


Stare Decisis As A Constitutional Requirement, Thomas Healy Sep 2001

Stare Decisis As A Constitutional Requirement, Thomas Healy

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Cost-Benefit Default Principles, Cass R. Sunstein Jun 2001

Cost-Benefit Default Principles, Cass R. Sunstein

Michigan Law Review

Courts should be reluctant to apply the literal terms of a statute to mandate pointless expenditures of effort. . .. Unless Congress has been extraordinarily rigid, there is likely a basis for an implication of de minimis authority to provide exemption when the burdens of regulation yield a gain of trivial or no value. It seems bizarre that a statute intended to improve human health would .. . lock the agency into looking at only one half of a substance's health effects in determining the maximum level for that substance. [I]t is only where there is "clear congressional intent to preclude consideration ...


Concluding Thoughts On The Practical And Collateral Consequences Of Anastasoff, J. Thomas Sullivan Apr 2001

Concluding Thoughts On The Practical And Collateral Consequences Of Anastasoff, J. Thomas Sullivan

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

The publication/citation debate inflamed by the Eighth Circuit decision has uncertain long-term implications. Among these impacts is the understanding of the parameters afforded federal courts by Article III of the United States Constitution. A number of other significant questions are raised, as well as including the access to and the reliance on the work product of the appellate courts.


California's Curious Practice Of "Pocket Review", Steven B. Katz Apr 2001

California's Curious Practice Of "Pocket Review", Steven B. Katz

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

The majority of any California appellate panel is permitted to certify an opinion for publication that establishes new law or modifies existing rules. The California Supreme court can reverse any publication decision without giving any reason. This practice is called "pocket review." Pocket reviews risk thwarting legislative intent and sweeping the results under the rug.


Preface: Anastasoff, Unpublished Opinions, And "No-Citation" Rules, Coleen M. Barger Apr 2001

Preface: Anastasoff, Unpublished Opinions, And "No-Citation" Rules, Coleen M. Barger

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

In the wake of the publication of Anastasoff v. United States a new round of debate has begun over the propriety of unpublished opions and their status as precedent. Circuit courts across the nation vary widely in how this "principle of policy" is treated, thus prompting the Journal of Appellate Practice and Process to call for papers, which are included herein.


The Unpublished, Non-Precedential Decision: An Uncomfortable Legality?, Melissa H. Weresh Apr 2001

The Unpublished, Non-Precedential Decision: An Uncomfortable Legality?, Melissa H. Weresh

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

The United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit ruled in 2000 that its rule prohibiting the citation of unpublished opinions was unconstitutional. The decision was ultimately vacated en banc. The legality of this prohibition merits consideration by the United States Supreme Court.


A Closer Look At Unpublished Opinions In The United States Courts Of Appeals, Michael Hannon Apr 2001

A Closer Look At Unpublished Opinions In The United States Courts Of Appeals, Michael Hannon

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

Some legal researchers may assume that all cases decided by federal courts are published. However, many United States courts of appeals’ decisions go unpublished. United States courts of appeals’ decisions are important sources of law since they are the court of last resort for most litigants. By making a survey of Westlaw and LEXIS, the author sheds light on some aspects of unpublished opinions.


Constitutionality Of "No-Citation" Rules, Salem M. Katsh, Alex V. Chachkes Apr 2001

Constitutionality Of "No-Citation" Rules, Salem M. Katsh, Alex V. Chachkes

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No-citation rules raise serious constitutional concerns. Assuming that it is constitutional to designate an opinion as nonprecedential, it is not constitutional to prohibit citing an opinion. No-citation rules are unconstitutional for two reasons. The first, citation prohibitions interfere with a litigant’s First Amendment right of speech and petition. Second, citation prohibitions violate the separation of powers.


Unpublished Decisions In The Federal Courts Of Appeals: Making The Decision To Publish, Stephen L. Wasby Apr 2001

Unpublished Decisions In The Federal Courts Of Appeals: Making The Decision To Publish, Stephen L. Wasby

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

The rise of cases brought before federal appellate courts has caused most opinions to be designated as unpublished. This practice has created much controversy. This essay addresses the decision to publish, guidelines for publication, and enforcement of those guidelines within courts.


Publicity And The Judicial Power, Daniel N. Hoffman Apr 2001

Publicity And The Judicial Power, Daniel N. Hoffman

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

The judicial branch was created in order to ensure that the rule of law and not the rule of man prevailed. Judges must use reasoning and analysis to fulfill this role. Making decisions based on mere coin tosses or without giving a reason for the decision detracts from the rule of law. Issuing decisions that cannot be published or cited also detracts the judicial role of ensuring that law rules the land.


Judging In The Days Of The Early Republic: A Critique Of Judge Richard Arnold's Use Of History In Anastasoff V. United States, R. Ben Brown Apr 2001

Judging In The Days Of The Early Republic: A Critique Of Judge Richard Arnold's Use Of History In Anastasoff V. United States, R. Ben Brown

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

Judge Arnold writes in his opinion that courts have the power to interpret or find the law but not create it. He argues that this practice was well established during colonial times and that it was adopted at the nation’s creation. The source of law during the formation of the United States is not as clear as Judge Arnold claims. Courts applied their roles differently in each jurisdiction. The complex history of the appropriate role of the judiciary contradicts Judge Arnold’s claim.


Are Some Words Better Left Unpublished?: Precedent And The Role Of Unpublished Decisions, K.K. Duvivier Apr 2001

Are Some Words Better Left Unpublished?: Precedent And The Role Of Unpublished Decisions, K.K. Duvivier

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

The practice of unpublished decisions and their precedential value causes much controversy. The practice of unpublished opinions creates a solution for how to deal effectively with heavy caseloads. Electronic databases make unpublished decisions readily available, which removes any secrecy that critics fear. Unpublished opinions are treated in one of three ways by the courts. In addition, three pragmatic issues are created by allowing opinions to go unpublished: 1) the availability of these decisions, 2) the quality of the reasoning in unpublished decisions, and 3) the treatment of unpublished opinions as precedent.


Anastasoff V. United States And Appeals In Veterans' Cases, Charles G. Mills Apr 2001

Anastasoff V. United States And Appeals In Veterans' Cases, Charles G. Mills

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

Many cases regarding veterans' benefits are heard in the Federal Circuit. The Federal Circuit has a practice of issuing one sentence orders in some cases. This practice benefits veterans by allowing decisions adverse to veterans to be made without creating precedential value. Removing the practice of unpublished opinions in the Federal Circuit would extinguish this benefit.


The Gestation Of Birthright Citizenship, 1868-1898: States' Rights, The Law Of Nations, And Mutual Consent, Bernadette Meyler Apr 2001

The Gestation Of Birthright Citizenship, 1868-1898: States' Rights, The Law Of Nations, And Mutual Consent, Bernadette Meyler

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

This article considers the inheritance of the seventeenth-century English common law conception of the subject in nineteenth-century America and, ultimately, in the Supreme Court’s decision in United States v. Wong Kim Ark (1898). It examines the claims for birthright citizenship derived from British common law and the three principal arguments against them. These latter included: objections to the assertion of a federal common law of citizenship from the perspective of state sovereignty; arguments that the United States should embrace citizenship by blood rather than by birth in order to conform to the practice of the law of nations and ...


Objective Interpretation And Objective Meaning In Holmes And Dickerson: Interpretive Practice And Interpretive Theory, Patrick J. Kelley Mar 2001

Objective Interpretation And Objective Meaning In Holmes And Dickerson: Interpretive Practice And Interpretive Theory, Patrick J. Kelley

Nevada Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Rejection Versus Termination: A Sublessee's Rights In A Lease Rejected In A Bankruptcy Proceeding Under 11 U.S.C. § 365(D)(4), Vivek Sankaran Feb 2001

Rejection Versus Termination: A Sublessee's Rights In A Lease Rejected In A Bankruptcy Proceeding Under 11 U.S.C. § 365(D)(4), Vivek Sankaran

Michigan Law Review

When a party files for bankruptcy under chapter 11 of the United States Code, the court typically appoints a trustee to handle all of the party's financial obligations. The trustee's responsibilities include investigating the financial condition of the debtor, the operation of the business, the desirability of continuing the business, and any other matter relevant to the disposition of the bankrupt estate. If a bankrupt party holds a commercial lease, the trustee possesses two options for dealing with the lease. One option is to reject the lease, which ends the bankrupt party's obligation to adhere to the ...


Cases Concerning Equity And The Courts Of Equity 1550-1660, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 2001

Cases Concerning Equity And The Courts Of Equity 1550-1660, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

This volume of previously unpublished equity reports in the period 1550-1660 includes cases of substantive equity prosecuted by English bill procedure, cases that explain the jurisdiction, procedures, and practices of the courts of equity in England, and a few cases from the courts of common law that touch on and consider the jurisdiction of the equity courts. Also included are cases in the equity courts that involve equitable remedies needed to protect common law rights. Frequently the equity judge had to determine a common law right before an equitable remedy could be granted.


Revamping Veil Piercing For All Limited Liability Entities: Forcing The Common Law Doctrine Into The Statutory Age, Rebecca J. Huss Jan 2001

Revamping Veil Piercing For All Limited Liability Entities: Forcing The Common Law Doctrine Into The Statutory Age, Rebecca J. Huss

Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


“That's My Holding And I'M Not Sticking To It!” Court Rules That Deprive Unpublished Opinions Of Precedential Authority Distort The Common Law, Suzanne O. Snowden Jan 2001

“That's My Holding And I'M Not Sticking To It!” Court Rules That Deprive Unpublished Opinions Of Precedential Authority Distort The Common Law, Suzanne O. Snowden

Washington University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Romantic Common Law, Enlightened Civil Law: Legal Uniformity And The Homogenization Of The European Union, Vivian Grosswald Curran Jan 2001

Romantic Common Law, Enlightened Civil Law: Legal Uniformity And The Homogenization Of The European Union, Vivian Grosswald Curran

Articles

The main thrust of this article is to suggest how legal uniformity may result in the European Union despite its Member States' encompassing the two highly distinct legal traditions of the common law and the civil law. My theory is that the defining characteristics of the civil-law legal culture, although in stark and profound contrast with those of the common-law legal system, nevertheless appear prominently and pervasively in the non-legal spheres of common-law nations; and vice versa, such that common-law legal characteristics correspond closely to elements often excluded from civil-law legal cultures, but which are included in the non-legal domains ...


Inherited Legal Systems And Effective Rule Of Law: Africa And The Colonial Legacy, Sandra F. Joireman Jan 2001

Inherited Legal Systems And Effective Rule Of Law: Africa And The Colonial Legacy, Sandra F. Joireman

Political Science Faculty Publications

The question of whether particular types of legal institutions influence the effectiveness of the rule of law has long been answered with conjecture. Common law lawyers and judges tend to believe that the common law system is superior. This opinion is based on the idea that the common law system inherited from the British is more able to protect the rights of the individual than civil law judicial systems. Quite the opposite point of view can be found in lawyers from civil law countries, who may view the common law system as capricious and disorganised. This paper compares the effectiveness ...


Eminent Domain, Exactions, And Railbanking: Can Recreational Trails Survive The Court’S Fifth Amendment Takings Jurisprudence, Danaya C. Wright Jan 2001

Eminent Domain, Exactions, And Railbanking: Can Recreational Trails Survive The Court’S Fifth Amendment Takings Jurisprudence, Danaya C. Wright

UF Law Faculty Publications

This article attempts to locate the legal aspects of recreational trail development within the increasingly powerful property rights movement. The most complex result of this rising property rights rhetoric is a clear shift in constitutional takings doctrine to be more sympathetic to landowners' arguments. Thus, the interplay of takings decisions and trails development will be the focus of most of this article.

Part II provides a brief account of the legal structure of governmental land use controls and the current state of takings jurisprudence to form a basic background for the different ways in which recreational trails have been developed ...


Federal Common Law, Cooperative Federalism, And The Enforcement Of The Telecom Act, Philip J. Weiser Jan 2001

Federal Common Law, Cooperative Federalism, And The Enforcement Of The Telecom Act, Philip J. Weiser

Articles

Congress increasingly has enacted cooperative federalism programs to achieve complex regulatory policy objectives. Such programs combine the authority of federal regulators, state regulators, and federal courts in creative and often pathmarking ways, but the failure of these actors to appreciate fully their respective roles threatens to undermine cooperative federalism's effectiveness. In this Article, Professor Philip Weiser develops a coherent vision of how federal courts should enforce cooperative federalism regulatory programs. In particular, he relates the rise and purpose of cooperative federalism to the federal courts' increased reluctance to make federal common law under the Erie doctrine and their greater ...


Free-Standing Due Process And Criminal Procedure: The Supreme Court's Search For Interpretive Guidelines, Jerold H. Israel Jan 2001

Free-Standing Due Process And Criminal Procedure: The Supreme Court's Search For Interpretive Guidelines, Jerold H. Israel

Articles

When I was first introduced to the constitutional regulation of criminal procedure in the mid-1950s, a single issue dominated the field: To what extent did the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment impose upon states the same constitutional restraints that the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Eighth Amendments imposed upon the federal government? While those Bill of Rights provisions, as even then construed, imposed a broad range of constitutional restraints upon the federal criminal justice system, the federal system was (and still is) minuscule as compared to the combined systems of the fifty states. With the Bill of Rights provisions ...