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Employer Prerogative And Employee Rights: The Never-Ending Tug-Of-War, Henry L. Chambers Jr. Nov 2000

Employer Prerogative And Employee Rights: The Never-Ending Tug-Of-War, Henry L. Chambers Jr.

Missouri Law Review

Where there are employees and employers, there will be employment relationships in need of mending. That reality is enough to guarantee that employment law will always be a warm, if not hot, area of the law. The article and notes on employment law in this issue demonstrate that the development of employment law continues apace.


Breaking Down The Boundaries Of Malpractice Law, Philip G. Peters Jr. Nov 2000

Breaking Down The Boundaries Of Malpractice Law, Philip G. Peters Jr.

Missouri Law Review

Historically, courts have treated professional malpractice cases as unique. When disputes that would otherwise have been governed by tort rules of general application have arisen in the context of medical treatment, courts have routinely constructed special rules for the resolution of those disputes. Recent evidence suggests that this penchant for special rules may be weakening and that malpractice law may be slowly melting back into the sea of tort doctrine. The three Missouri health care la cases noted in this issue are the latest evidence that courts today are more willing to resolve medical negligence actions using tort rules of ...


Just What The Doctor Ordered--Or Was It: Missouri Pharmacists' Duty Of Care In The 21st Century, Michele L. Hornish Nov 2000

Just What The Doctor Ordered--Or Was It: Missouri Pharmacists' Duty Of Care In The 21st Century, Michele L. Hornish

Missouri Law Review

Recent studies have suggested that up to five percent of all prescriptions filled in hospitals contain errors. Medical commentators have expressed concern that this figure may be even higher for outpatient prescription. As a result of medication errors, patients suffer uncomfortable and even traumatic results in the form of “adverse drug events,” while the health care system incurs needless costs. These adverse drug events are normally preventable, and are considered to be a current problem by hospital administrators and doctors alike. Now, courts are beginning to recognize the problem, and have suggested a solution by adopting a heightened standard of ...


New Provision For Tolling The Limitations Periods For Seeking Tax Refunds: Its History, Operation And Policy, And Suggestions For Reform, The, Bruce A. Mcgovern Nov 2000

New Provision For Tolling The Limitations Periods For Seeking Tax Refunds: Its History, Operation And Policy, And Suggestions For Reform, The, Bruce A. Mcgovern

Missouri Law Review

This Article examines a provision of the Internal Revenue Code that Congress enacted in 1998 that suspends the running of the limitations periods that apply to claims for tax refunds. The provision suspends the limitations periods when a taxpayer is "financially disabled," which is defined as being unable to manage one's financial affairs due to a sufficiently severe, medically determinable physical or mental impairment. Congress enacted this provision in response to a series of cases that culminated in a decision of the United States Supreme Court in which the Court held that courts could not equitably suspend, or "toll ...


Dancing Around Employment At-Will: Can Fraud Provide Plaintiffs A Way To Hold Their Employers Liable, James E. Meadows Nov 2000

Dancing Around Employment At-Will: Can Fraud Provide Plaintiffs A Way To Hold Their Employers Liable, James E. Meadows

Missouri Law Review

For over a century, the employment at-will doctrine has formed an important part of American jurisprudence. The doctrine, and what some see as its potentially harsh results, have received strong criticism. In some states, courts have used their ability to modify the common law to alter the employment at-will doctrine by creating exceptions based on public policy, the use of employee handbooks, and face-to-face statements by managers that imply a promise of employment. The Missouri Court of Appeals for the Eastern District of Missouri recently gave discharged employees a new way to avoid the almost absolute bar of the employment ...


Could Somebody Call A Doctor--On-Call Physicians And The Duty To Treat, Jane Drummond Nov 2000

Could Somebody Call A Doctor--On-Call Physicians And The Duty To Treat, Jane Drummond

Missouri Law Review

The law of negligence imposes few affirmative duties on actors in society. In the medical profession specifically, negligence law traditionally contains no requirement that a physician provide medical treatment to those in need absent an existing relationship between the doctor and patient. Yet there has long been the sense that doctors owe a higher duty to the public, and courts are finding ways to redefine the doctor-patient relationship to allow plaintiffs greater access to claims for a physician’s failure to render care. In Millard v. Corrado, the Missouri Court of Appeals for the Easter District of Missouri provides plaintiffs ...


Learned Intermediary Doctrine In The Age Of Direct Consumer Advertising, The, Bradford B. Lear Nov 2000

Learned Intermediary Doctrine In The Age Of Direct Consumer Advertising, The, Bradford B. Lear

Missouri Law Review

Traditionally drug manufacturers have been excused from the general duty to warn consumers about the risks associated with their products by the learned intermediary doctrine. Though the doctrine has a sound grounding in public policy, drug companies have recently employed marketing strategies that undermine the usefulness of the learned intermediary rule. In Doe v. Alpha Therapeutic Corp., the Missouri Court of Appeals for the Eastern District of Missouri recently addressed whether the learned intermediary doctrine can be used as a defense when a drug company markets a product directly to consumers. This Note discusses the learned intermediary defense and its ...


Has Wright Line Gone Wrong--Why Pretext Can Be Sufficient To Prove Discrimination Under The National Labor Relations Act, Michael J. Hayes Nov 2000

Has Wright Line Gone Wrong--Why Pretext Can Be Sufficient To Prove Discrimination Under The National Labor Relations Act, Michael J. Hayes

Missouri Law Review

Every year in the United States, thousands of employees are illegally fired for joining or supporting unions. These employees must bring their claims to the National Labor Relations Board (the “Board”), which applies its famous Wright Line standard to decide thousands of discrimination cases each year. Probably the most common issue in labor discrimination cases is “pretext.” In virtually every case, an employer claims that it fired an employee not for an illegal antiunion motive, but for a legitimate business reason. The pretext issue arises when the evidence shows that the legitimate reason asserted by the employer was most likely ...


Must We Talk About That Reasonable Accommodation--The Eighth Circuit Says Yes, But Is The Answer Reasonable , Jill S. Kingsbury Nov 2000

Must We Talk About That Reasonable Accommodation--The Eighth Circuit Says Yes, But Is The Answer Reasonable , Jill S. Kingsbury

Missouri Law Review

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) has been hailed by advocates for persons with disabilities as the most important civil rights act passed since 1964, and as the “Emancipation Proclamation” for Americans with disabilities. Critics of the ADA “cast the law as overly broad, difficult to interpret, inefficient, and as a preferential treatment initiative.” Other question whether the law’s economic benefits outweigh its administrative costs. Empirical data also suggests that “the ADA’s track record in improving employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities appears dismal.” Aggravating the problem, and contrary to the media’s portrayal of the ADA as ...


Mental-Mental Claims--Placing Limitations On Recovery Under Workers' Compensation For Day-To-Day Frustrations, Natalie D. Riley Nov 2000

Mental-Mental Claims--Placing Limitations On Recovery Under Workers' Compensation For Day-To-Day Frustrations, Natalie D. Riley

Missouri Law Review

No abstract provided.


Identifying Real Dichotomies Underlying The False Dichotomy: Twenty-First Century Mediation In An Eclectic Regime, Jeffrey W. Stemple Jul 2000

Identifying Real Dichotomies Underlying The False Dichotomy: Twenty-First Century Mediation In An Eclectic Regime, Jeffrey W. Stemple

Journal of Dispute Resolution

Preparation for the University of Missouri's lecture on dispute resolution and consideration of commentary prompted additional thoughts on the issue and a more refined perspective on the issue of facilitation-versus-evaluation and its role in the continued development of modem ADR. Rather than attempt to fine-tune a completed article, this reply will address the additional perspectives as well as note points of distinct conflict or quibble with commentators. First, this reply provides some additional assessment framing the facilitative-evaluative debate as well as a modified brief in support of the legitimacy of some elements of evaluation in the eclectic mediation that ...


Mediating Citizen Complaints Against The Police: An Exploratory Study , Samuel Walker, Carol Archbold Jul 2000

Mediating Citizen Complaints Against The Police: An Exploratory Study , Samuel Walker, Carol Archbold

Journal of Dispute Resolution

This article examines the subject of mediating citizen complaints against the police. It reviews the history of citizen complaints, presents data on existing police complaint mediation programs, and discusses the potential contributions of mediation to police accountability.


How Level Is The Playing Field - Should Employers Be Able To Circumvent State Workers' Compensation Schemes By Creating Their Own Employee Compensation Plans - Strawn V. Afc Enterprises, D/B/A Church's Chicken, Nathan E. Ross Jul 2000

How Level Is The Playing Field - Should Employers Be Able To Circumvent State Workers' Compensation Schemes By Creating Their Own Employee Compensation Plans - Strawn V. Afc Enterprises, D/B/A Church's Chicken, Nathan E. Ross

Journal of Dispute Resolution

Disputes resulting from workplace incidents are consuming increasingly greater proportions of our courts' dockets.2 In recent years, "[e]mployment litigation has grown at a rate many times greater than litigation in general ... almost one thousand percent greater than the increase in all other types of civil litigation combined."3 Due to the unequal bargaining power employers possess over employees in these disputes, states have passed workers' compensation laws to level the playing field.' However, employers have chosen not to subscribe to their states' workers' compensation systems, but instead have created their own employee compensation plans.' In addition, these employer-created ...


Foreword, Leonard L. Riskin Jul 2000

Foreword, Leonard L. Riskin

Journal of Dispute Resolution

In 1994, I proposed the idea of charting a mediator's role on a facilitative evaluative continuum. Since that time, the notion surely has generated at least as much heat as light. In this Symposium, we are fortunate to have a lead article and final reflections by Professor Jeffrey Stempel, one of the most thoughtful and prolific commentators on this issue. Professor Stempel's argument that eclecticism in mediation is inevitable is well-honed, and yet our distinguished commentators - Gary Gill-Austem, Richard Birke, Kim Kovach, Lela Love, Jon Lande, and Zena Zumeta - found much to say about it.


Evaluation And Facilitation: Moving Past Either/Or, Richard Birke Jul 2000

Evaluation And Facilitation: Moving Past Either/Or, Richard Birke

Journal of Dispute Resolution

In this essay, I argue that there is no such thing as a purely facilitative mediation of a legal dispute. Neither is there such a thing as a purely evaluative mediation of a legal dispute. Mediation of legal disputes is, by its nature, always facilitative and evaluative. The evaluative-facilitative divide is an artificial artifact of history. Following this introduction, I offer a brief description of the development of the field of legal mediation, and I attempt to place the Riskin grid in historical context. I then hope to push the debate toward a new moment, one in which all mediation ...


Mediator's Privilege: Can A Mediator Be Compelled To Testify In A Civil Case - California Privilege Law Says Yes - Olam V. Congress Mortgage Co., The, Jennifer C. Bailey Jul 2000

Mediator's Privilege: Can A Mediator Be Compelled To Testify In A Civil Case - California Privilege Law Says Yes - Olam V. Congress Mortgage Co., The, Jennifer C. Bailey

Journal of Dispute Resolution

In the present case, Olain v. Congress, the United States District Court for the Northern District of California has, in a precedent-setting opinion, forced a mediator to testify in a subsequent civil procedure. 9 This Note will examine two recurring issues regarding mediation: first, the appropriate law to be applied when a case sits in federal court; and second, the history of the mediation privilege, the present state of the mediation privilege within the federal and state courts, and the consequences of the instant case.


Recent Developments: The Uniform Arbitration Act, S. Owen Griffin, Kelli Hopkins, Scot L. Wiggins, Emily Woodward Jul 2000

Recent Developments: The Uniform Arbitration Act, S. Owen Griffin, Kelli Hopkins, Scot L. Wiggins, Emily Woodward

Journal of Dispute Resolution

This Article is an overview of recent court decisions that interpret state versions of the Uniform Arbitration Act ("U.A.A.").' Arbitration statutes patterned after the U.A.A. have been adopted by thirty-four states and the District of Columbia. The goal of this project is to promote uniformity in the interpretation of the U.A.A. by articulating the underlying policies and rationales of recent court decisions interpreting the U.A.A?


Negligent Retention And Arbitration: The Effect Of A Developing Tort On Traditional Labor Law, Terry A. Bethel Jul 2000

Negligent Retention And Arbitration: The Effect Of A Developing Tort On Traditional Labor Law, Terry A. Bethel

Journal of Dispute Resolution

As negligent retention theories continue to grow, courts will inevitably address these questions. This article will offer a brief introduction to the tort of negligent retention and related doctrines and will discuss how courts will accommodate them within traditional labor law principles. Despite my impulsive reaction that negligent retention poses a threat to arbitration, I conclude that, for the most part, negligent retention and labor arbitration can coexist peacefully.


Inevitability Of The Eclectic: Liberating Adr From Ideology, The, Jeffrey W. Stempel, Kimberlee K. Kovach Jul 2000

Inevitability Of The Eclectic: Liberating Adr From Ideology, The, Jeffrey W. Stempel, Kimberlee K. Kovach

Journal of Dispute Resolution

In this essay, I continue to argue against such rigid characterization of the mediation enterprise and in favor of what I term an "eclectic" approach to mediation. The eclectic style is one in which a mediator - while maintaining neutrality and impartiality at all times - attempts to both assist the disputants in finding acceptable solutions on their own and also remains free to provide necessary guidance as to the outcomes that might obtain in the legal regime that will govern their dispute should no agreement result from the mediation. In short, my view of good mediation practice is one where the ...


Adr: An Eclectic Array Of Processes, Rather Than One Eclectic Process, Lela P, Love Jul 2000

Adr: An Eclectic Array Of Processes, Rather Than One Eclectic Process, Lela P, Love

Journal of Dispute Resolution

The thesis of this essay is that when mediators try to resolve a controversy by providing their analysis fo the legal - or other- merits, they are providing the service that judges, arbitrators and neutral experts provide. In essence, such endeavors use the neutral's judgment, award or opinion to determine or jump-start a resolution. That add-on activity to mediation should be called by its proper name. This essay will not review the many reasons that a single neutral combining the roles of facilitator and evaluator is problematic, since that has been done extensively elsewhere.' Instead, in part one, we highlight ...


Facilitative Mediator Responds, A, Zena Zumeta Jul 2000

Facilitative Mediator Responds, A, Zena Zumeta

Journal of Dispute Resolution

I appreciate the thoughtfulness and conclusions of Professor Jeffrey Stempel in his article. His title, "The Inevitability of the Eclectic," seems completely right to me. Most mediators I know who have had training in mediation are more eclectic than squarely in one camp or another. They use techniques that are geared both to their own personalities and to the needs of the case. This, indeed, is a level of sophistication that is a heartening indication of the maturity of the field of mediation. However, there are many points in Stempel's argument that I disagree with, including some of his ...


Employees Beware: Signing Arbitration Agreements May Limit Your Remedies In Suits Filed By The Eeoc - Equal Employment Opportunity Commission V. Waffle House, Inc., Sarah Baxter Jul 2000

Employees Beware: Signing Arbitration Agreements May Limit Your Remedies In Suits Filed By The Eeoc - Equal Employment Opportunity Commission V. Waffle House, Inc., Sarah Baxter

Journal of Dispute Resolution

Arbitration is used regularly to settle employment disputes, and federal policy supports these agreements between private parties. Federal statutes, however, also grant the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission the authority to pursue employment discrimination claims in court. These claims do more than vindicate the rights of individuals, they also safeguard the public interest in ending employment discrimination. A conflict may arise between these two policies when employees sign agreements to submit statutory discrimination claims to arbitration. This Note examines the split of authority on the issue of whether the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission should be permitted to seek money damages on ...


Faithful, Gary L. Gill-Austern Jul 2000

Faithful, Gary L. Gill-Austern

Journal of Dispute Resolution

The term "facilitative mediation" reminds me of the term "Old Testament." As we Jews from time to time have reminded Christians, the Jewish people call their canon the Tanakh, or, in English, the Hebrew Scriptures. That the same thirty-nine books - Genesis, Exodus, and so on - are labeled "Old Testament" by others indicates that another (later) religious community believes that an event occurred that requires what came before to be interpreted through the prism of an intervening event or reality. For Christians, this is expressed in the New Testament. Returning, then, to the current discussion, it takes a partisan of "evaluative ...


Arbitration And Its Collateral Estoppel Effect On Third Parties - Vandenberg V. Superior Court, Thurston K. Cromwell Jul 2000

Arbitration And Its Collateral Estoppel Effect On Third Parties - Vandenberg V. Superior Court, Thurston K. Cromwell

Journal of Dispute Resolution

This Note examines why California's supreme court chose not to allow judicially confirmed arbitration awards to apply to third parties. The court based its decision on the contract model of arbitration and determined that an agreement to arbitrate was not necessarily an agreement binding third parties. However, this decision undermines the credibility of the arbitration process and fails to consider the negative impact relitigation of issues will have on the California courts.


Toward More Sophisticated Mediation Theory, John Lande Jul 2000

Toward More Sophisticated Mediation Theory, John Lande

Journal of Dispute Resolution

Some of these benefits are due to the particular arguments of facilitation proponents, while others involve a general development of the field resulting from the debate. The first benefit is that facilitation proponents have highlighted how mediation can promote many important values such as party self-determination, and they have cautioned about risks of unfairness created by mediator evaluation as described in Part III. Second, the facilitation-evaluation debate has stimulated a better appreciation of the appropriateness of these techniques in different types of cases, as described in Part IV. Third, the debate has contributed to reducing ill-considered evaluation practice, as discussed ...


To Rule Or Not To Rule: Ripeness As A Prerequisite To Ruling In Federal Regulatory Takings Cases. Hendler V. United States, Todd C. Werts Jun 2000

To Rule Or Not To Rule: Ripeness As A Prerequisite To Ruling In Federal Regulatory Takings Cases. Hendler V. United States, Todd C. Werts

Journal of Environmental and Sustainability Law

No abstract provided.


A Call For A New Policy Toward Cercla Cleanup Costs In The Eighth Circuit: Is It Fair To Punish The Prp Who Initiates The Cleanup At A Superfund Site? , Ricky Pearce Jun 2000

A Call For A New Policy Toward Cercla Cleanup Costs In The Eighth Circuit: Is It Fair To Punish The Prp Who Initiates The Cleanup At A Superfund Site? , Ricky Pearce

Journal of Environmental and Sustainability Law

No abstract provided.


Legislative Update Jun 2000

Legislative Update

Journal of Environmental and Sustainability Law

No abstract provided.


Table Of Contents Jun 2000

Table Of Contents

Journal of Environmental and Sustainability Law

No abstract provided.


Environmental News Jun 2000

Environmental News

Journal of Environmental and Sustainability Law

No abstract provided.