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2000

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Trends. Terrorism, Terror Management, And Faking Mental Disorder, Ibpp Editor Dec 2000

Trends. Terrorism, Terror Management, And Faking Mental Disorder, Ibpp Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article highlights the difficulty of determining if defendants on trial are faking mental disorder. The case in question involves the bombing of United States embassies in Kenya and Tanzania.


Product-Related Risk And Cognitive Biases: The Shortcomings Of Enterprise Liability, James A. Henderson Jr., Jeffrey J. Rachlinski Oct 2000

Product-Related Risk And Cognitive Biases: The Shortcomings Of Enterprise Liability, James A. Henderson Jr., Jeffrey J. Rachlinski

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Products liability law has witnessed a long debate over whether manufacturers should be held strictly liable for the injuries that products cause. Recently, some have argued that psychological research on human judgment supports adopting a regime of strict enterprise liability for injuries caused by product design. These new proponents of enterprise liability argue that the current system, in which manufacturer liability for product design turns on the manufacturer's negligence, allows manufacturers to induce consumers into undertaking inefficiently dangerous levels or types of consumption. In this paper we argue that the new proponents of enterprise liability have: (1) not provided any …


Trends. Homosexual Politics And Security: The American Psychological Association (Apa) Brief Of Amicus Curiae No. 99-699, Ibpp Editor Aug 2000

Trends. Homosexual Politics And Security: The American Psychological Association (Apa) Brief Of Amicus Curiae No. 99-699, Ibpp Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article discusses the American Psychological Association's (APA's) brief of amicus curiae, which the APA submitted in order to provide a context for the Supreme Court of the United States to review the policy of the Boy Scouts of America and Monmouth Council, Boy Scouts of America, which involved the Boy Scouts, homosexuality, and claims about discrimination against homosexuals.


One Crime, Many Convicted: Dissociative Identity Disorder And The Exclusion Of Expert Testimony In State V. Greene, Mary Eileen Crego Jul 2000

One Crime, Many Convicted: Dissociative Identity Disorder And The Exclusion Of Expert Testimony In State V. Greene, Mary Eileen Crego

Washington Law Review

In State v. Greene, the Supreme Court of Washington held that expert testimony about Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) was not admissible to support an insanity or diminished-capacity defense. Even though the court acknowledged DID as a generally accepted medical disorder, the court reasoned that such testimony would not be helpful to the trier of fact, as required by Washington Evidence Rule (ER) 702, because the court has not established a specific standard for determining the legal responsibility of a defendant with multiple personalities. This Note argues that the Greene court had sufficient scientific evidence to establish a legal standard …


Doubts About Daubert: Psychiatric Anecdata As A Case Study, Christopher Slobogin Jun 2000

Doubts About Daubert: Psychiatric Anecdata As A Case Study, Christopher Slobogin

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


Violence Risk Assessment: Scientific Validity And Evidentiary Admissibility, John Monahan Jun 2000

Violence Risk Assessment: Scientific Validity And Evidentiary Admissibility, John Monahan

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


How To Cross-Train For Peak Lawyering, Heidi K. Brown May 2000

How To Cross-Train For Peak Lawyering, Heidi K. Brown

Articles & Chapters

No abstract provided.


The Tyranny Of Money, Edward J. Mccaffery May 2000

The Tyranny Of Money, Edward J. Mccaffery

Michigan Law Review

The more things change, the more they stay the same. A human activity almost as venerable as the accumulation and opulent display of vast riches is the condemnation of the accumulation and opulent display of vast riches. People have been busily engaged at each for several millennia now. Both continue in full flower as America races into the twenty-first century with its liberal capitalist democracy ascendant around the world, its rich richer than ever, its less-rich curiously lagging behind. Yet figuring out what, exactly, is wrong with the excessive accumulation and opulent display of wealth, on the one hand, and …


On The Nature Of Norms: Biology, Morality, And The Disruption Of Order, Owen D. Jones May 2000

On The Nature Of Norms: Biology, Morality, And The Disruption Of Order, Owen D. Jones

Michigan Law Review

For a long time - and through the now-quaint division of disciplines - morals and norms have been set apart from other behaviorbiasing phenomena. They have also been set apart from each other. Morals are generally ceded in full to philosophers. Norms have been ceded to sociologists. In retrospect, it is not clear why this should be so. Reality is notoriously impervious to taxonomy, and the axis supposedly distinguishing morals from other norms is, after all, arbitrary. Moreover, behavior-biasing phenomena interact in important ways, making the study of parts - without more - just the study of parts. But one …


The "New" Law And Psychology: A Reply To Critics, Skeptics, And Cautious Supporters, Jeffrey J. Rachlinski Mar 2000

The "New" Law And Psychology: A Reply To Critics, Skeptics, And Cautious Supporters, Jeffrey J. Rachlinski

Cornell Law Faculty Publications



Spectral Evidence: The Ramona Case: Incest, Memory, And Truth On Trial In Napa Valley, By Moira Johnston [Book Review], Cynthia Grant Bowman Mar 2000

Spectral Evidence: The Ramona Case: Incest, Memory, And Truth On Trial In Napa Valley, By Moira Johnston [Book Review], Cynthia Grant Bowman

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Folk Psychology And Legal Understanding, Robert Birmingham Jan 2000

Folk Psychology And Legal Understanding, Robert Birmingham

Faculty Articles and Papers

No abstract provided.


Insurance: How It Matters As Psychological Fact And Political Metaphor, Thomas Morawetz Jan 2000

Insurance: How It Matters As Psychological Fact And Political Metaphor, Thomas Morawetz

Faculty Articles and Papers

No abstract provided.


The Perils Of Public Opinion, Deborah W. Denno Jan 2000

The Perils Of Public Opinion, Deborah W. Denno

Faculty Scholarship

Justice, Liability, and Blame: Community Views and the Criminal Law (“Justice”) is a rich, creative, and intriguing book with an ambitious goal: to examine the extent to which laypersons' views of justice (their “moral intuitions”) are reflected in current criminal codes. This Article discusses the significance of Justice's approach to understanding law and why the book is an excellent springboard for further research comparing community standards and legal codes. However, this Article particularly emphasizes the perils of incorporating public opinion into the law based upon three major sources: (1) this Article's own study of national and New Jersey demographic and …


Hidden Economy Of The Unconscious, The, Anne Dailey Jan 2000

Hidden Economy Of The Unconscious, The, Anne Dailey

Faculty Articles and Papers

No abstract provided.


Striving For Rationality, Anne Dailey Jan 2000

Striving For Rationality, Anne Dailey

Faculty Articles and Papers

No abstract provided.


Stalking: Cultural, Clinical, And Legal Considerations, Carol E. Jordan, Karen Quinn, Bradley O. Jordan, Celia R. Daileader Jan 2000

Stalking: Cultural, Clinical, And Legal Considerations, Carol E. Jordan, Karen Quinn, Bradley O. Jordan, Celia R. Daileader

Office for Policy Studies on Violence Against Women Publications

Crimes of violence against women are unique in their treatment by our culture and our system of legal justice. Both culturally and statutorily, victims of crimes which have historically been perpetrated against women, such as rape, domestic violence, and stalking have received significant focus. This article highlights cultural considerations and provides a statutory and case law analysis.


Mental Health Advance Directives: Having One's Say?, Justine A. Dunlap Jan 2000

Mental Health Advance Directives: Having One's Say?, Justine A. Dunlap

Faculty Publications

First, this Article traces the extension of the right to refuse treatment to the psychiatric realm. Next, the Article addresses advance directives for health care and their utility for mental health issues. Then, the Article examines state statutory and judicial responses to mental health advance directives. Finally, the Article analyzes why the right to control future psychiatric treatment, including the right to refuse treatment, has been slow to gain acceptance. Although mental health advance directives present real challenges, legally and otherwise, this Article concludes that they are firmly rooted in the law and their rejection is, more often than not, …


Homosexuality As Contagion: From The Well Of Loneliness To The Boy Scouts, Nancy J. Knauer Jan 2000

Homosexuality As Contagion: From The Well Of Loneliness To The Boy Scouts, Nancy J. Knauer

Nancy J. Knauer

In the political arena, there are currently two central and competing views of homosexuality. Pro-family organizations, working from a contagion model of homosexuality, contend that homosexuality is an immoral, unhealthy, and freely chosen vice. Many pro-gay organizations espouse an identity model of homosexuality under which sexual orientation is an immutable, unchosen, and benign characteristic. Both pro-family and pro-gay organizations believe that to define homosexuality is to control its legal and political status. This sometimes bitter debate regarding the nature of same-sex desire might seem like an exceedingly contemporary development. However, the ex-gay media blitz of 2000 represents only the latest …


A Different Kind Of Sameness: Beyond Formal Equality And Antisubordination Principles In Gay Legal Theory And Constitutional Doctrine, Nancy Levit Jan 2000

A Different Kind Of Sameness: Beyond Formal Equality And Antisubordination Principles In Gay Legal Theory And Constitutional Doctrine, Nancy Levit

Nancy Levit

Gay legal theory is at a crossroads reminiscent of the sameness/difference debate in feminist circles and the integrationist debate in critical race theory. Formal equality theorists take the heterosexual model as the norm and then seek to show that gays, lesbians, bisexuals, and transsexuals - except for their choice of partners - are just like heterosexuals. Antisubordination theorists attack the heterosexual model itself and seek to show that a society that insists on such a model is unjust. Neither of these strategies is wholly satisfactory. The formal equality model will fail to bring about fundamental reforms as long as sexual …


Sentimental Stereotypes: Emotional Expectations For High-And Low-Status Group Members, Larissa Z. Tiedens, Phoebe C. Ellsworth, Batja Mesquita Jan 2000

Sentimental Stereotypes: Emotional Expectations For High-And Low-Status Group Members, Larissa Z. Tiedens, Phoebe C. Ellsworth, Batja Mesquita

Articles

Three vignette studies examined stereotypes of the emotions associated with high- and low-status group members. In Study 1a, participants believed that in negative situations, high-status people feel more angry than sad or guilty and that low-status people feel more sad and guilty than angry. Study 1b showed that in response to positive outcomes, high-status people are expected to feel more pride and low-status people are expected to feel more appreciation. Study 2 showed that people also infer status from emotions: Angry and proud people are thought of as high status, whereas sad, guilty, and appreciative people are considered low status. …


Using Bargaining For Advantage In Law School Negotiation Courses, Chris Guthrie Jan 2000

Using Bargaining For Advantage In Law School Negotiation Courses, Chris Guthrie

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

Options, options, options ....The Negotiation literature-at least the "problem-solving" or "interestbased" or "principled" negotiation literature'repeats this mantra over and over and over. It seems self-evident that having lots of options is a good idea because more options means more to choose from. The more options there are to choose from, however, the more difficult choosing can be. Options, in short, may increase the likelihood that one will make an optimal decision, but they impose added "decision costs" on the decision maker. Law professors now face this happy dilemma when choosing materials for their Negotiation courses. Options abound-including the negotiation chapters …


Race In The Courtroom: Perceptions Of Guilt And Dispositional Attributions, Samuel R. Sommers, Phoebe C. Ellsworth Jan 2000

Race In The Courtroom: Perceptions Of Guilt And Dispositional Attributions, Samuel R. Sommers, Phoebe C. Ellsworth

Articles

The present studies compare the judgments of White and Black mock jurors in interracial trials. In Study 1, the defendant’s race did not influence White college students’ decisions but Black students demonstrated ingroup/outgroup bias in their guilt ratings and attributions for the defendant’s behavior. The aversive nature of modern racism suggests that Whites are motivated to appear nonprejudiced when racial issues are salient; therefore, the race salience of a trial summary was manipulated and given to noncollege students in Study 2. Once again, the defendant’s race did not influence Whites when racial issues were salient. But in the non-race-salient version …


The Power Of Myth: A Comment On Des Rosiers' Therapeutic Jurisprudence And Appellate Adjudication, Edward A. Dauer Jan 2000

The Power Of Myth: A Comment On Des Rosiers' Therapeutic Jurisprudence And Appellate Adjudication, Edward A. Dauer

Seattle University Law Review

In the American legal system, the myths surrounding judicial decision-making may pose significant impediments to achieving therapeutic jurisprudence. Courts, we are taught, are confined to the preexisting law, applying it to the conflict as the law itself requires that the conflict be framed. This is, in many ways that matter, a belief system that is not conducive to the therapeutic jurisprudence way.


Thoughts On Some Potential Appellate And Trial Court Applications Of Therapeutic Jurisprudence, Steve Leben Jan 2000

Thoughts On Some Potential Appellate And Trial Court Applications Of Therapeutic Jurisprudence, Steve Leben

Seattle University Law Review

To date, the application of therapeutic jurisprudence principles has been concentrated mainly on specialized trial courts: drug treatment courts, domestic violence courts, criminal courts, and juvenile and family courts. Its application to trial courts generally, as well as its application to the appellate courts, remains largely unexplored. This Article considers three areas in which trial and appellate courts may want to consider applying therapeutic jurisprudence.


Silencing The Appellant's Voice: The Antitherapeutic Per Curiam Affirmance, Amy D. Ronner, Bruce J. Winick Jan 2000

Silencing The Appellant's Voice: The Antitherapeutic Per Curiam Affirmance, Amy D. Ronner, Bruce J. Winick

Seattle University Law Review

This Article will analyze the antitherapeutic impact of the per curium affirmance (PCA) in two steps. First, delving into the psychology of procedural justice, this Article will explain how litigants value "voice," or the ability to tell their stories, as well as "validation," or the sense that the decisionmaker has heard their words and taken them seriously. Second, this Article, through the use of narrative, will show how a PCA had a negative psychological impact on an actual appellant in a criminal case. The Article will conclude by proposing an alternative to the antitherapeutic PCA.


Preface, Seattle University Law Review Jan 2000

Preface, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Therapeutic Jurisprudence In The Appellate Arena, David B. Wexler Jan 2000

Therapeutic Jurisprudence In The Appellate Arena, David B. Wexler

Seattle University Law Review

In this Introduction, I will briefly summarize Des Rosiers' Court Review article, entitled From Telling to Listening: A Therapeutic Analysis of the Role of Courts in Minority-Majority Conflicts, placing it in a framework that transcends minority-majority conflicts and encourages discussion regarding the use of therapeutic jurisprudence by appellate tribunals. My brief summary is followed by a series of comments that have the potential of launching a refreshing line of inquiry into the appellate process, opinion writing, and the formulation of legal doctrine.


The Appeal Of Therapeutic Jurisprudence, Shirley S. Abrahamson Jan 2000

The Appeal Of Therapeutic Jurisprudence, Shirley S. Abrahamson

Seattle University Law Review

If therapeutic jurisprudence is so good, its applicability should not be limited to the trial courts. This Article offers some examples of how appellate courts can join the trial courts in applying therapeutic jurisprudence, but it also raises some concerns.


The Mythical Power Of Myth? A Response To Professor Dauer, Nathalie Des Rosiers Jan 2000

The Mythical Power Of Myth? A Response To Professor Dauer, Nathalie Des Rosiers

Seattle University Law Review

Professor Dauer makes two very interesting points about why endorsing a therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) approach rocks fundamental assumptions about the common law legal system. First, he argues that demonstrating impartiality more than empathy is a practice so entrenched in the system that it cannot be dislodged. Second, he argues that the TJ approach that I advocate in my discussion of the Quebec Secession Reference is more "mediation" than adjudication. I would like to respond to both points and conclude with another example as to how a TJ approach may prove attractive in times of criticism about judicial activism in constitutional …