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Full-Text Articles in Law

Of Provinces And S.35 Rights, Kerry Wilkins Apr 1999

Of Provinces And S.35 Rights, Kerry Wilkins

Dalhousie Law Journal

It is now well established that federal law and regulatory activity may interfere with the exercise of aboriginal peoples' existing treaty and aboriginal rights, despite s. 35(1) of the Constitution Act, 1982, whenever the federal government can justify the interference. It is not yet clear, though, what power, if any, Canada's provinces have to regulate, even in justified ways, such rights and their exercise. This article argues that the provinces, as a general rule, have no such authority. Except in certain very specific and isolated circumstances, they have no power, even apart from s. 35, to regulate the exercise of …


Section 365 In The Consumer Context: Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue, Michael G. Hillinger, Ingrid Michelsen Hillinger Jan 1999

Section 365 In The Consumer Context: Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue, Michael G. Hillinger, Ingrid Michelsen Hillinger

Faculty Publications

The § 365 consumer debtor case law has a further complication. Much of it arises in the context of the last great bankruptcy frontier, Chapter 13. Until recently, Chapter 11 has occupied the minds and hearts of courts and attorneys. Not any more. And, as attorneys and courts take a closer, harder look at Chapter 13, it is no longer possible to describe it as a “streamlined creditors-can’t-vote Chapter 11”. Chapter 13 is unique, presenting its very own quandaries, not the least of which is how its provisions and § 365 interact. We live in interesting times.


Fifty Years Of Disability Law: The Relevance Of The Universal Declaration, Charles D. Siegal Jan 1999

Fifty Years Of Disability Law: The Relevance Of The Universal Declaration, Charles D. Siegal

ILSA Journal of International & Comparative Law

This discussion is about the relevance of the Universal Declaration to disability rights law. There has been a good deal of discussion historically about the status of the Declaration.


Book Preface, Hendrik Hartog, Thomas A. Green Jan 1999

Book Preface, Hendrik Hartog, Thomas A. Green

Manuscript of Women, Church, and State: Religion and the Culture of Individual Rights in Nineteenth-Century America

At her death in December 1997, Betsy Clark had been working for more than a dozen years on a study tentatively entitled "Women, Church and State: Religion and the Culture of Individual Rights in Nineteenth-Century America." Between 1987 and 1995, several of the planned chapters had appeared in law reviews and in history journals. Another chapter had been written and revised before and during the first stages of her illness. Two chapters can be found in preliminary form in her 1989 Princeton dissertation and had been presented to a colloquium at Harvard Law School. But other chapters planned for the …


Framers’ Intent And Military Power: Has Supreme Court Deference To The Military Gone Too Far?, Kalyani Robbins Jan 1999

Framers’ Intent And Military Power: Has Supreme Court Deference To The Military Gone Too Far?, Kalyani Robbins

Faculty Publications

The first ten amendments to the United States Constitution, ratified in 1791 and known as the Bill of Rights, create the core of what people today consider their most basic freedoms. Without these rights, and consistent judicial adherence to them, most Americans would not feel secure. There are two major sources of danger to these basic rights: internal and external. Internally, we must protect ourselves from our own infringement of these rights through the firm restrictions that the Constitution places on the government in its treatment of the people. Externally, we must protect our system of maintaining these freedoms from …


The Bill Of Rights As An Exclamation Point, Gary S. Lawson Jan 1999

The Bill Of Rights As An Exclamation Point, Gary S. Lawson

Faculty Scholarship

Akhil Amar's The Bill of Rights: Creation and Reconstruction ("The Bill of Rights")' is one of the best law books of the twentieth century. That is not surprising, as it grows out of two of the best law review articles of the twentieth century' and was written by one of the century's premier legal scholars. I have been an unabashed Akhil Amar fan ever since our overlapping law school days more than fifteen years ago, and I am thrilled to have my perspicacity and good judgment vindicated by the publication of this remarkable work.