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Full-Text Articles in Law

Fencing Cyberspace: Drawing Borders In A Virtual World, Maureen A. O'Rourke Jan 1998

Fencing Cyberspace: Drawing Borders In A Virtual World, Maureen A. O'Rourke

Faculty Scholarship

In the last few years, the Internet has increasingly become a source of information even for the historically computer illiterate. The growing popularity of the Internet has been driven in large part by the World Wide Web (web). The web is a system that facilitates use of the Internet by helping users sort through the great mass of information available on it. The web uses software that allows one document to link to and access another, and so on, despite the fact that the documents may reside on different machines in physically remote locations. The dispersion of data that is …


Defining The Limits Of Free-Riding In Cyberspace: Trademark Liability For Metatagging, Maureen A. O'Rourke Jan 1998

Defining The Limits Of Free-Riding In Cyberspace: Trademark Liability For Metatagging, Maureen A. O'Rourke

Faculty Scholarship

The Internet has the potential to revolutionize global communication, offering a relatively low-cost means for information exchange. Since its inception as a research network, the Internet has developed into a "a vast library including millions of readily available and indexed publications and a sprawling mall offering goods and services."' The World Wide Web ("Web"), a tool which helps to organize the enormous amount of information available on the Internet, has been a catalyst in the Internet's emergence as a viable commercial marketplace.


Intellectual Property As Price Discrimination: Implications For Contract, Wendy J. Gordon Jan 1998

Intellectual Property As Price Discrimination: Implications For Contract, Wendy J. Gordon

Faculty Scholarship

As people become enamored with the possible benefits of allowing price discrimination in contracts for intellectual goods, they should realize that traditional intellectual property law works by fostering price discrimination among customers. This simple fact has implications for federal pre-emption, and is a reminder of the complexity of the economic issues involved. Increasing a seller's ability to price discriminate will often involve increasing his monopoly power, with dubious welfare effects.


Striking A Delicate Balance: Intellectual Property, Antitrust, Contract And Standardization In The Computer Industry, Maureen A. O'Rourke Jan 1998

Striking A Delicate Balance: Intellectual Property, Antitrust, Contract And Standardization In The Computer Industry, Maureen A. O'Rourke

Faculty Scholarship

Shortly before the Second Intermational Harvard Conference on Internet & Society, the Department of Justice ("DOJ") brought a widely publicized suit against the Microsoft Corporation. In its complaint, the DOJ charged Microsoft with engaging in a variety of antitrust wrongs connected with its alleged monopoly position in the market for personal computer ("PC") operating system software. The Conference panel on Antitrust and the Internet, which had planned to focus on how antitrust law affects standard-setting efforts and the implications for the Intermet, quickly abandoned that topic in favor of discussion of the Microsoft suit.


On Commodifying Intangibles, Wendy J. Gordon, Sam Postbrief Jan 1998

On Commodifying Intangibles, Wendy J. Gordon, Sam Postbrief

Faculty Scholarship

It was made clear long ago that property and value are different things. Value exists. It is a fact. It can arise from law, and much of law aims at creating more value in the world. But value can also arise in spite of law (consider, for example, the fortunes that bootleggers made during the Roaring Twenties), or in law's interstices. When a particular value arises despite a lack of explicit legal protection, its possessors often ask courts or legislatures to give them a legal entitlement to preserve and further exploit that value. Typically the holders demand (1) a liberty …