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Full-Text Articles in Law

Remedies For The Misappropriation Of Intellectual Property By State And Municipal Governments Before And After Seminole Tribe: The Eleventh Amendment And Other Immunity Doctrines, Paul J. Heald, Michael L. Wells Jun 1998

Remedies For The Misappropriation Of Intellectual Property By State And Municipal Governments Before And After Seminole Tribe: The Eleventh Amendment And Other Immunity Doctrines, Paul J. Heald, Michael L. Wells

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


From Patchwork To Network: Strategies For International Intellectual Property In Flux, Paul E. Geller Mar 1998

From Patchwork To Network: Strategies For International Intellectual Property In Flux, Paul E. Geller

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

Laws of intellectual property define what is bought and sold on media and technology markets, notably works, trademarks, and inventions. Laws and treaties have traditionally been made and enforced by nation-states operating in a patchwork of territories. Now, the media and technology marketplace is being globalized in digital networks. The law is only beginning to respond to this change.

To analyze this process in the field of intellectual property, this Article will consider the following questions: First, how is the patchwork of national laws lagging behind new networks in this field? Second, how does the international regime of intellectual property …


Acts Of Parliament: Privatisation, Promulgation And Crown Copyright – Is There A Need For A Royal Royalty?, Mark Perry Jan 1998

Acts Of Parliament: Privatisation, Promulgation And Crown Copyright – Is There A Need For A Royal Royalty?, Mark Perry

Law Publications

The road of privatisation of government assets is littered with the debris of mishaps and oversights. One clear illustration is the history and effect of the sale of the Government Printing Office (GPO) in 1990. Within the sale process there was a failure to ensure adequate consideration of the policy implications from an important perspective, namely the effect of privatising the means of promulgation of the normative materials of the State. Furthermore, there was no enquiry into the dubious assumptions made as to Crown Copyright in legislation.

Intellectual property rights in primary legal materials create a dilemma for policy makers. …


Internet Infoglut And Invisible Ink: Spamdexing Search Engines With Meta Tags, Ira Nathenson Jan 1998

Internet Infoglut And Invisible Ink: Spamdexing Search Engines With Meta Tags, Ira Nathenson

Ira Steven Nathenson

This Article addresses 'spamdexing,' namely, the practice of stuffing invisible keywords into webpages in order to try to get more favorable listings with search engines. For instance, some website owners will stuff the trademarks of competitors into a webpage’s code, particularly by using 'meta tags,' indexing keywords that can be hidden in a webpage’s source code. Although meta tags are not typically viewed by users, the code can be read by search engines, with the result that webpages may be improperly boosted in search engine rankings. Such practices can confuse the public and have also spurred trademark lawsuits. But the …


An Economic Analysis Of Intellectual Property Rights: Justifications And Problems Of Exclusive Rights, Incentives To Generate Information, And The Alternative Of A Government Run Reward System, Steve Calandrillo Jan 1998

An Economic Analysis Of Intellectual Property Rights: Justifications And Problems Of Exclusive Rights, Incentives To Generate Information, And The Alternative Of A Government Run Reward System, Steve Calandrillo

Articles

This article examines and questions the traditional justifications for intellectual property (I.P.) rights in America (focusing on copyright and patent law), and explores incentives necessary to induce the creation of these works of information. I conclude that changes are needed to I.P. law in order to best foster society's dual goals of 1) promoting incentives to create I.P. works (such as currently patented drugs), while also 2) maximizing distribution of those products to all consumers who would stand to gain (and not merely those who can afford the monopoly price charged). Hence, I suggest the creation of a Government-Run Reward …


Transforming Trade Secret Theft Violations Into Federal Crimes: The Economic Espionage Act, Lorin L. Reisner Jan 1998

Transforming Trade Secret Theft Violations Into Federal Crimes: The Economic Espionage Act, Lorin L. Reisner

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Defense Of "Fair Use": A Primer, Alan J. Hartnick Jan 1998

The Defense Of "Fair Use": A Primer, Alan J. Hartnick

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Using Creativity To Fight A $60 Billion Consumer Problem—Counterfeit Goods, Xuan-Thao Nguyen, Maxim H. Waldbaum Jan 1998

Using Creativity To Fight A $60 Billion Consumer Problem—Counterfeit Goods, Xuan-Thao Nguyen, Maxim H. Waldbaum

Articles

For centuries, consumers have been willing to pay exorbitant prices for unique or premiumquality goods. Throughout the evolution of the "designer label" market, counterfeiters have lurked in the shadows of the economic landscape. Thus, the problem of counterfeit goods represents nothing new in the global economy.


Introduction To Keynote Address: Symposium: The First Amendment And The Media: Convergence--Necessary, Evil, Or Both? The Legal, Economic, And Cultural Impacts Of Mega Media Mergers, Joel R. Reidenberg Jan 1998

Introduction To Keynote Address: Symposium: The First Amendment And The Media: Convergence--Necessary, Evil, Or Both? The Legal, Economic, And Cultural Impacts Of Mega Media Mergers, Joel R. Reidenberg

Faculty Scholarship

It is my pleasure today to introduce our keynote speaker, Professor Larry Lessig. Professor Lessig is the Jack and Lillian Berkman Professor of Entrepreneurial Legal Studies at Harvard Law School and is a renowned scholar in intellectual property, constitutional, Internet, and new media law. Indeed, the last time Professor Lessig spoke here at Fordham, he was focusing on his pioneering work addressing fidelity in constitutional interpretation. Of course, not the sort of fidelity that the Senate is debating this afternoon.


Intellectual Property As Price Discrimination: Implications For Contract, Wendy J. Gordon Jan 1998

Intellectual Property As Price Discrimination: Implications For Contract, Wendy J. Gordon

Faculty Scholarship

As people become enamored with the possible benefits of allowing price discrimination in contracts for intellectual goods, they should realize that traditional intellectual property law works by fostering price discrimination among customers. This simple fact has implications for federal pre-emption, and is a reminder of the complexity of the economic issues involved. Increasing a seller's ability to price discriminate will often involve increasing his monopoly power, with dubious welfare effects.