Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

1996

Law and Society

Institution
Keyword
Publication
Publication Type
File Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 110

Full-Text Articles in Law

A Model State Act To Authorize And Regulate Physician-Assisted Suicide, Charles H. Baron, Clyde Bergstresser, Dan W. Brock, Garrick F. Cole, Nancy S. Dorfman, Judith A. Johnson, Lowell E. Schnipper, James Vorenberg, Sidney H. Wanzer Dec 1996

A Model State Act To Authorize And Regulate Physician-Assisted Suicide, Charles H. Baron, Clyde Bergstresser, Dan W. Brock, Garrick F. Cole, Nancy S. Dorfman, Judith A. Johnson, Lowell E. Schnipper, James Vorenberg, Sidney H. Wanzer

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Despite laws in many states prohibiting assisted suicide, an unknown but significant number of people each year commit suicide with the aid of a physician. In recent years, the phenomenon of physician-assisted suicide has attracted greater attention as physicians have openly risked prosecution to shed light on the subject, advocates have raised a series of legal challenges to laws banning assisted suicide, and a federal judge has struck down the nation's first statute allowing physicians to assist patients in suicide. In this Article, nine authors from the fields of law, medicine, philosophy and economics propose a comprehensive statute to ...


Warrior Ants: The Enduring Threat Of The Small War And The Land-Mine, Kenneth Anderson Nov 1996

Warrior Ants: The Enduring Threat Of The Small War And The Land-Mine, Kenneth Anderson

Book Reviews

This 1996 Times Literary Supplement essay examines two very different books about aspects of warfare. Robert O'Connell's Ride of the Second Horseman is a speculative history of the rise of warfare among human beings, looking back to early human beings. It is a striking account, even though speculative, because it deals in early human behavior without offering an explanation from evolutionary biology. O'Connell acknowledges that non-human species can engage in warfare, and specifically notes ants. In that process, he carefully distinguishes - as few writers do - between aggression, violence, weapons use, predation, and war.


The Fitness Of Law: Using Complexity Theory To Describe The Evolution Of Law And Society And Its Practical Meaning For Democracy, J. B. Ruhl Nov 1996

The Fitness Of Law: Using Complexity Theory To Describe The Evolution Of Law And Society And Its Practical Meaning For Democracy, J. B. Ruhl

Vanderbilt Law Review

Why does law change, and how does that process unfold? In this Article, Professor Ruhl examines those questions using tools from the emerging field of Complexity Theory. Complexity Theory involves the study of change in dynamical systems. Its findings of unpredictable change in a variety of natural and social settings have profoundly effected the theoretical foundations of many fields of study. In particular, Complexity Theory has revisited the Darwinist theory of biological evolution and used it as a platform for developing a general theory of system evolution that focuses on the concept of fitness landscapes. The fitness, or sustainability, of ...


Moral Discourse, Bioethics, And The Law, Carl E. Schneider Nov 1996

Moral Discourse, Bioethics, And The Law, Carl E. Schneider

Articles

Dan Callahan follows a distinguished tradition when he uses the phrase "moral discourse" to describe the law's work. The frequency with which that image is deployed suggests its resonance and even rightness: When we think about the way society considers moral issues and develops moral positions, it can be useful to imagine the law as one of many social institutions that contribute to a social discussion. Nevertheless, this image is misleading. At least for our (graying and balding) genera- tions, the law is regarded as a worthy participant in American moral discourse preeminently because of its part in the ...


Lights, Camera, Litigate: Lawyers And The Media In Canada And The United States, Charles W. Wolfram Oct 1996

Lights, Camera, Litigate: Lawyers And The Media In Canada And The United States, Charles W. Wolfram

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Drawing on recent high profile cases in Canada and the United States, the author examines the different extent to which lawyers in those two countries comment to the media about ongoing litigation. He investigates various formal constraints upon lawyer comment, such as court-imposed publication bans and rules of professional responsibility. He also looks at the way in which lawyer behavior is attributable to non-formal, cultural determinants.


Negotiating Demands For Justice: Public Interest Law As A Problem Solving Dialogue, David Dominguez Sep 1996

Negotiating Demands For Justice: Public Interest Law As A Problem Solving Dialogue, David Dominguez

In the Public Interest

No abstract provided.


Juror Delinquency In Criminal Trials In America, 1796-1996, Nancy J. King Aug 1996

Juror Delinquency In Criminal Trials In America, 1796-1996, Nancy J. King

Michigan Law Review

This article examines two aspects of the jury system that have attracted far less attention from scholars than from the popular press: avoidance of jury duty by some citizens, and misconduct while serving by others. Contemporary reports of juror shortages and jury dodging portray a system in crisis. Coverage of recent high-profile cases suggests that misconduct by jurors who do serve is common. In the trial of Damian Williams and Henry Watson for the beating of Reginald Denny, a juror was kicked off for failing to deliberate; Exxon, Charles Keating, and the man accused of murdering Michael Jordan's father ...


Children Going West, Kenneth Anderson Jul 1996

Children Going West, Kenneth Anderson

Book Reviews

(Review Essay of Hillary Clinton, it Takes a Village)This Times Literary Supplement (London) review essay from 1996 takes up Hillary Rodham Clinton's It Takes a Village and Other Lessons Children Teach Us, and Emmy E. Werner's, Pioneer Children on the Journey West. The review takes a tough line against the therapeutic yet simultaneously authoritarian ethic of Clinton's book; it argues that Clinton has essentially conflated a set of local community institutions - places of identity - with state institutions of therapeutic and social control - bureaucratic loci of state management of deracinated, passive individuals. It sets this against the ...


Children Going West (Review Essay Of Hillary Clinton, It Takes A Village), Kenneth Anderson Jul 1996

Children Going West (Review Essay Of Hillary Clinton, It Takes A Village), Kenneth Anderson

Kenneth Anderson

This Times Literary Supplement (London) review essay from 1996 takes up Hillary Rodham Clinton's It Takes a Village and Other Lessons Children Teach Us, and Emmy E. Werner's, Pioneer Children on the Journey West. The review takes a tough line against the therapeutic yet simultaneously authoritarian ethic of Clinton's book; it argues that Clinton has essentially conflated a set of local community institutions - places of identity - with state institutions of therapeutic and social control - bureaucratic loci of state management of deracinated, passive individuals. It sets this against the ethic of responsibility evoked in the diaries of girls ...


Commentary: Re-Positioning Human Rights Discourse On "Asian" Perspectives, Sharon K. Hom Jul 1996

Commentary: Re-Positioning Human Rights Discourse On "Asian" Perspectives, Sharon K. Hom

Buffalo Journal of International Law

No abstract provided.


Was There Sex Before Calvin Klein?, Linda R. Hirshman Jun 1996

Was There Sex Before Calvin Klein?, Linda R. Hirshman

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


Risk-Based Regulatory Reform And Public Participation, David A. Wirth May 1996

Risk-Based Regulatory Reform And Public Participation, David A. Wirth

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Meaningful public participation has been perceived as difficult to accommodate in regulatory proceedings requiring technical scientific judgments, especially those involving quantitative risk assessments. Quantitative risk assessment, however, is not a purely technical exercise, but instead involves the application of policy preferences in the form of assumptions, extrapolation from animal data to humans and high to low doses, management of incomplete data sets, and resolution of scientific uncertainties. Such junctures at which policy preferences are applied are opportunities to reflect social value choices that are not wholly "scientific." Those opportunities should be explicitly identified as such by the regulator. These considerations ...


A New Class Of Lawyers: The Therapeutic As Rights Talk, Kenneth Anderson May 1996

A New Class Of Lawyers: The Therapeutic As Rights Talk, Kenneth Anderson

Book Reviews

This 1996 essay reviews three books: Anthony T. Kronman, 'The Lost Lawyer: Failing Ideals of the Legal Profession' (Belknap 1993); Steven Brint, 'In an Age of Experts: The Changing Role of Professionals in Politics and Public Life' (Princeton 1994); and Christopher Lasch, 'The Revolt of the Elites and the Betrayal of Democracy' (WW Norton 1995). The review essay argues that lawyers in the United States should be seen as part of the professional New Class who use the law as a monopoly in the management by elites of the rest of society. The review examines the history of New Class ...


The Real Ethic Of Death And Dying, Norman L. Cantor May 1996

The Real Ethic Of Death And Dying, Norman L. Cantor

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Peter Singer, Rethinking Life and Death


Whose Justice? Which Victims?, Lynne Henderson May 1996

Whose Justice? Which Victims?, Lynne Henderson

Michigan Law Review

A Review of George Fletcher, With Justice for Some: Victim's Rights in Criminal Trials


An "Age Of [Im]Possibility": Rhetoric, Welfare Reform, And Poverty, Lisa A. Crooms May 1996

An "Age Of [Im]Possibility": Rhetoric, Welfare Reform, And Poverty, Lisa A. Crooms

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Joel F. Handler, The Poverty of Welfare Reform and Mark Robert Rank, Living on the Edge: The Realities of Welfare in America


Measuring Poverty: A New Approach, Benjamin Hoorn Barton May 1996

Measuring Poverty: A New Approach, Benjamin Hoorn Barton

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Measuring Poverty: A New Approach by The National Research Council.


The Rooster's Egg: On The Persistence Of Prejudice, Elise M. Bruhl May 1996

The Rooster's Egg: On The Persistence Of Prejudice, Elise M. Bruhl

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Patricia J. Williams, The Roosters' Egg: On the Persistence of Prejudice


A New Class Of Lawyers: The Therapeutic As Rights Talk, Kenneth Anderson Apr 1996

A New Class Of Lawyers: The Therapeutic As Rights Talk, Kenneth Anderson

Kenneth Anderson

This 1996 essay reviews three books: Anthony T. Kronman, 'The Lost Lawyer: Failing Ideals of the Legal Profession' (Belknap 1993); Steven Brint, 'In an Age of Experts: The Changing Role of Professionals in Politics and Public Life' (Princeton 1994); and Christopher Lasch, 'The Revolt of the Elites and the Betrayal of Democracy' (WW Norton 1995). The review essay argues that lawyers in the United States should be seen as part of the professional New Class who use the law as a monopoly in the management by elites of the rest of society. The review examines the history of New Class ...


Remarks: Address By The Honorable J. Joseph Curran, Jr., Attorney General, State Of Maryland , J.Joseph Curran Jr. Apr 1996

Remarks: Address By The Honorable J. Joseph Curran, Jr., Attorney General, State Of Maryland , J.Joseph Curran Jr.

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Foreword: Never Again, Franklin D. Cleckley Apr 1996

Foreword: Never Again, Franklin D. Cleckley

Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Reaffirming Affirmative Action We've Come A Long Way, But Not Far Enough, Cynthia R. Mabry Apr 1996

Reaffirming Affirmative Action We've Come A Long Way, But Not Far Enough, Cynthia R. Mabry

Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice

No abstract provided.


The Constitution As An Obstacle To Government Ethics -- Reformist Legislation After National Treasury Employees Union, George D. Brown Apr 1996

The Constitution As An Obstacle To Government Ethics -- Reformist Legislation After National Treasury Employees Union, George D. Brown

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

No abstract provided.


Comments By Angel Oquendo, Ángel Oquendo Apr 1996

Comments By Angel Oquendo, Ángel Oquendo

Faculty Articles and Papers

No abstract provided.


Taking And Giving: Police Power, Public Value, And Private Right, Gerald Torres Apr 1996

Taking And Giving: Police Power, Public Value, And Private Right, Gerald Torres

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

This lecture is divided into three parts. First, I will outline a critique of efficiency as it has functioned as the metanarrative underlying our basic current understanding of social institutions. A metanarrative is merely a legitimating background story rooted in the claim that it is the "story that can reveal the meaning of all stories." The claim I am making is that the standards of efficiency in common usage have operated in this way in questions of social policy. For government institutions, this is summed up in the popular claim of politicians that they will "run government like a business ...


Describing Without Circumscribing: Questioning The Construction Of Gender In The Discourse Of Intimate Violence, Phyllis Goldfarb Mar 1996

Describing Without Circumscribing: Questioning The Construction Of Gender In The Discourse Of Intimate Violence, Phyllis Goldfarb

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In this Article, Professor Goldfarb examines the construction of gender roles in the discourse on intimate violence. The Article argues that this discourse assumes that male violence against female intimates represents the problems of battering in its entirety. In doing so, the discourse renders invisible the battering that occurs outside this discourse, most notably battering within same-sex relationships. The Article focuses on how the gender assumptions in the domestic violence discourse affected the representation of the Framingham Eight, a group of women who killed their batterers and were incarcerated in the women’s prison in Framingham, Massachusetts. These women petitioned ...


Better Living Through Crime And Tort, Anita Bernstein Feb 1996

Better Living Through Crime And Tort, Anita Bernstein

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Lessons From The Past: Revenge Yesterday And Today Symposium, Tamar Frankel Feb 1996

Lessons From The Past: Revenge Yesterday And Today Symposium, Tamar Frankel

Faculty Scholarship

Professor Seipp's Paper transports us to the Middle Ages to discover a society that views crime and tort quite differently from the way we view these categories today. Yet our discovery of that society offers a perspective about our own. In Professor Seipp's world the victim of a wrong had a choice: demand revenge by determining how the wrongdoer would be punished, or demand monetary compensation. These two entitlements were mutually exclusive. The victim could choose either one, but to some extent, especially in earlier times, the right of revenge was considered a higher right that the victim ...


In A Greener Voice: Feminist Theory And Environmental Justice, Robert R.M. Verchick Jan 1996

In A Greener Voice: Feminist Theory And Environmental Justice, Robert R.M. Verchick

Robert R.M. Verchick

This Article explores the way in which women activists--and the feminist strategies they contribute--help shape the meaning and pursuit of environmental justice. [FN8] It shows how methods associated with feminism have contributed to the movement's premier concerns for family safety and social equality and have prompted creative ways to identify and attack a broad range of environmental threats. The Article is divided into four parts. Part I briefly surveys the participation of women in the environmental justice movement and examines the reasons why so many women become involved in grassroots environmental struggles. Part II shows how the strategies and ...


How Charitable Organizations Influence Federal Tax Policy: "Rent-Seeking" Charities Or Virtuous Politicians?, Nancy J. Knauer Jan 1996

How Charitable Organizations Influence Federal Tax Policy: "Rent-Seeking" Charities Or Virtuous Politicians?, Nancy J. Knauer

Nancy J. Knauer

Tax-exempt charitable organizations exert considerable influence over Congress, the Department of the Treasury, and the Internal Revenue Service in matters dealing with exemption from federal income tax and the tax deductibility of charitable contributions. This Article uses both public choice and public interest analysis to help identify various features of the charitable community and explain how exempt organizations weild political influence despite the restrictions placed on their activities under the tax code. Arguing that the influence of charitable organizations over tax policy can be explained from either a public choice or public interest vantage point, the Article concluds that the ...