Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

Four Remarkable Ohio Women Lawyers--The Cronise Sisters Of Tiffin, Florence Allen, And Cleveland Law School's "Hard-Boiled Mary'", Arthur R. Landever Oct 1994

Four Remarkable Ohio Women Lawyers--The Cronise Sisters Of Tiffin, Florence Allen, And Cleveland Law School's "Hard-Boiled Mary'", Arthur R. Landever

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Four Ohio Women blazed the trail. Among the early women lawyers in our state, they overcame resistance from the male bar or the culture of the day to distinguish themselves in the profession. Nettie Cronise was the first woman admitted to the Ohio bar. Her sister Florence followed, several months later. Florence Allen, admitted in 1914, became the nation's preeminent woman judge of her time. Mary Grossman, from Jewish immigrant roots, had a memorable career on the Cleveland Municipal Court. Why did these women choose law despite society's obstacles? What do they have to tell us?


Curriculum Vitae (Feminae): Biography And Early American Women Lawyers, Carol Sanger Jan 1994

Curriculum Vitae (Feminae): Biography And Early American Women Lawyers, Carol Sanger

Faculty Scholarship

In this review, Carol Sanger examines the recent surge of interest in the lives of early women lawyers. Using Jane Friedman's biography of Myra Bradwell, America's First Woman Lawyer, as a starting point, Professor Sanger explores the complexities for the feminist biographer of reconciling for herself and for her subject conflicting professional, political, and personal sensibilities. Professor Sanger concludes that to advance the project of women's history, feminist biographers ought not retreat to the comforts of commemorative Victorian biography, even for Victorian subject, but should instead strive to present and accept early women subjects on their own ...