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1994

Civil Procedure

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Institution
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Articles 1 - 30 of 31

Full-Text Articles in Law

On War And Justice, Jeffrey C. Tuomala Oct 1994

On War And Justice, Jeffrey C. Tuomala

Faculty Publications and Presentations

No abstract provided.


A Progress Report In Automatic Disclosure In The Federal Districts, Carl W. Tobias Aug 1994

A Progress Report In Automatic Disclosure In The Federal Districts, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

In this brief article, Tobias gives an update on a controversial amendment in the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, which provides for mandatory prediscovery, or automatic, disclosure. This articles serves to update readers on developments and clarifications since the author's previous article on the subject, published half a year earlier.


Comment On Judge Joseph F. Weis, Jr., Service By Mail--Is The Stamp Of Approval From The Hague Convention Always Enough?, Doug Rendleman Jul 1994

Comment On Judge Joseph F. Weis, Jr., Service By Mail--Is The Stamp Of Approval From The Hague Convention Always Enough?, Doug Rendleman

Scholarly Articles

Not available.


The Reluctant Partner: Making Procedural Law For International Civil Litigation, Stephen B. Burbank Jul 1994

The Reluctant Partner: Making Procedural Law For International Civil Litigation, Stephen B. Burbank

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Pragmatism Applied: Imagining A Solution To The Problem Of Court Congestion, Michael L. Seigel Apr 1994

Pragmatism Applied: Imagining A Solution To The Problem Of Court Congestion, Michael L. Seigel

UF Law Faculty Publications

Can we improve the efficiency of jury trials? If so, would this reduce the problem of court congestion? Is there any reason to favor this approach over those that seek to avoid jury trials altogether?

This Article attempts to answer these difficult questions. It does so by articulating and then employing a methodology suggested by recent scholarly ruminations about the philosophy of pragmatism and its implications for legal scholarship and practice. Although pragmatism does not provide "right answers" to questions of legal doctrine-indeed, it rejects the notion that such things exist-it does provide some guidance in formulating the search for ...


Perceptions Of Civil Justice: The Litigation Crisis Attitudes Of Civil Jurors, Valerie P. Hans, William S. Lofquist Apr 1994

Perceptions Of Civil Justice: The Litigation Crisis Attitudes Of Civil Jurors, Valerie P. Hans, William S. Lofquist

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Public perceptions that the civil justice system is in crisis are apparently widespread, but little is known about the causes or correlates of such views. This article analyzes the litigation crisis attitudes of a sample of civil jurors. Like the public, jurors endorsed a number of statements suggesting that there is a litigation crisis. Factor analysis identified two independent components: general concern over excessive litigation, and criticism of the civil jury. Litigation crisis views were found in all demographic and attitudinal subgroups. However, attitudes about the civil justice system were related to the respondent's political efficacy, claims consciousness, belief ...


The Transmittal Letter Translated, Carl W. Tobias Jan 1994

The Transmittal Letter Translated, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

The letter in which Chief Justice Rehnquist transmitted to Congress amendments to various Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, which became effective on December 1, 1993 is reproduced. Professor Tobias then offers his "translation" of the letter with his interpretation of what likely took place during the rule revision process involving the Advisory Committee on the Civil Rules, emphasizing the controversial revision of F.R.C.P. Rule 11.


The 1993 Revision Of Federal Rule 11, Carl W. Tobias Jan 1994

The 1993 Revision Of Federal Rule 11, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

The 1983 revision of Rule 11 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure ("Rule 11" or the "Rule") proved to be the most controversial amendment in the long history of the Federal Rules. Many federal judges inconsistently interpreted the provision's language and inconsistently applied the Rule. The 1983 version fostered much costly, unwarranted satellite litigation over its phrasing and the magnitude of sanctions that courts imposed while increasing incivility among lawyers. Rule 11 motions were filed and granted against civil rights plaintiffs more frequently than any other class of litigant, and numerous judges vigorously enforced the provision against the ...


The Straight-Line Method Of Determining Personal Jurisdiction, John M. Brumbaugh, William L. Reynolds Jan 1994

The Straight-Line Method Of Determining Personal Jurisdiction, John M. Brumbaugh, William L. Reynolds

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Iron Law Of Full Faith And Credit, William L. Reynolds Jan 1994

The Iron Law Of Full Faith And Credit, William L. Reynolds

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


1993 Federal Rules Amendments And The Montana Civil Rules, Carl W. Tobias Jan 1994

1993 Federal Rules Amendments And The Montana Civil Rules, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

On December 1, 1993, the most comprehensive package of amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (Federal Rules) in their half-century history became effective. Although the revisions include a number of changes that are relatively innocuous, modifications in Rule 11 governing sanctions and Rule 26 requiring mandatory pre-discovery or automatic disclosure were and remain controversial. The amendment to Rule 11 altered the 1983 revision of that Rule which had proved to be the most controversial amendment ever developed. The amendment to Rule 26 prescribing automatic disclosure was the most controversial formal proposal changing the Rules in their history. These ...


Improving The 1988 And 1990 Judicial Improvements Acts, Carl W. Tobias Jan 1994

Improving The 1988 And 1990 Judicial Improvements Acts, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

In this article, Professor Tobias analyzes and attempts to harmonize the conflicting frameworks for civil procedure reform embodied in the Civil Justice Reform Act of 1990 (CJRA) and its immediate predecessor, the Judicial Improvements and Access to Justice Act of 1988 (JIA). Congress intended the JIA to open the national and local rulemaking processes to public scrutiny and to decrease the use of local rules. Yet Professor Tobias finds the 1990 Act at odds with the earlier measure in several ways. By encouraging local experiments aimed at reducing litigation costs and delay, he argues, the CJRA shifted the locus of ...


Rodney King And The Decriminalization Of Police Brutality In America: Direct And Judicial Access To The Grand Jury As Remedies For Victims Of Police Brutality When The Prosecutor Declines To Prosecute, Peter L. Davis Jan 1994

Rodney King And The Decriminalization Of Police Brutality In America: Direct And Judicial Access To The Grand Jury As Remedies For Victims Of Police Brutality When The Prosecutor Declines To Prosecute, Peter L. Davis

Scholarly Works

This Article begins with the premise that, despite political rhetoric and occasional prosecutions to the contrary, police brutality has been effectively decriminalized in this country. The Article adopts the Rodney King case as the paradigm for examining this phenomenon. Scrutinizing the culture and semantics of police brutality, the author concludes that a double standard of criminality exists in the United States, under which different rules apply to a police than to everyone else. This double standard is socially dysfunctional. Particularly among minorities, it leads to a sense of cynicism about our legal system that can result in civil disorder when ...


Elevated Pleading In Environmental Litigation, Carl W. Tobias Jan 1994

Elevated Pleading In Environmental Litigation, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

The recent United States Supreme Court opinion in Leatherman v. Tarrant County Narcotics Intelligence and Coordination Unit is critical to parties and attorneys who participate in environmental litigation. Leatherman proscribed the imposition of pleading requirements that are stricter than those ordinarily applied under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 8(a). Such heightened pleading requirements compel plaintiffs to plead more facts, and courts can dismiss claims that fall short of the mark.

The Leatherman court considered civil rights actions alleging that municipalities are liable under 42 U.S.C. § 1983.2 Although Leatherman might seem of limited relevance to environmental lawsuits ...


Recent Federal Civil Justice Reform In Montana, Carl W. Tobias Jan 1994

Recent Federal Civil Justice Reform In Montana, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

The Montana Federal District Court has continued to experiment with nearly all of the procedures that the court included in the civil justice expense and delay reduction plan which it officially adopted during April 1992 under the Civil Justice Reform Act (CJRA) of 1990. The most important procedures are automatic disclosure, co-equal assignment of cases to Article III judges and magistrate judges located in Billings, and rather close judicial case management. The judicial officers, who include three active and one senior Article III judges and three full-time magistrate judges, and many Montana attorneys who practice in federal court have now ...


Repealing The Law Of Unintended Consequences? Comment On Walker (2), Thomas D. Rowe Jr. Jan 1994

Repealing The Law Of Unintended Consequences? Comment On Walker (2), Thomas D. Rowe Jr.

Faculty Scholarship

Commentary on, Laurens Walker, Avoiding Surprise From Federal Civil Rule Making: The Role of Economic Analysis, 23 Journal of Legal Studies 569 (1994).


Discovery In The Real World, Minna J. Kotkin Jan 1994

Discovery In The Real World, Minna J. Kotkin

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Evaluating Federal Civil Justice Reform In Montana, Carl W. Tobias Jan 1994

Evaluating Federal Civil Justice Reform In Montana, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

The Civil Justice Reform Act of 1990 (CJRA) has reached the mid-point of its implementation nationally and in the Montana Federal District Court. At this juncture, one of the most important aspects of statutory effectuation is evaluation of the experimentation that federal district courts have conducted under the legislation. The timing is particularly propitious in the Montana federal district because the court recently completed the annual assessment of statutory implementation that the CJRA requires. These developments in civil justice reform, particularly relating to evaluation of the experimentation which has occurred, warrant examination. This Article undertakes that effort. The Article first ...


Interstate Consolidation: A Comparison Of The Ali Project With The Uniform Transfer Of Litigation Act (American Law Institute Complex Litigation Project: A Symposium, In Memoriam Donald Theodore Trautman), Edward H. Cooper Jan 1994

Interstate Consolidation: A Comparison Of The Ali Project With The Uniform Transfer Of Litigation Act (American Law Institute Complex Litigation Project: A Symposium, In Memoriam Donald Theodore Trautman), Edward H. Cooper

Articles

The Uniform Transfer of Litigation Act (UTLA) was undertaken for purposes simpler than the mass consolidation of multiparty, multiforum litigation. It seeks to create an effective tool that can be used to reduce some of the artificial barriers that tradition has erected around the sovereign separateness of the many different court systems in this country. The fact of separate sovereignty must be recognized, however, and to this end consent of both transferring and receiving courts is required. Within the consent requirement, transfer from the court system of one sovereign to the court system of another can improve on present practices ...


Mandatory Disclosure And Local Abrogation: In Search Of A Theory For Optional Rules, Lauren K. Robel Jan 1994

Mandatory Disclosure And Local Abrogation: In Search Of A Theory For Optional Rules, Lauren K. Robel

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Fractured Procedure: The Civil Justice Reform Act Of 1990, Lauren K. Robel Jan 1994

Fractured Procedure: The Civil Justice Reform Act Of 1990, Lauren K. Robel

Articles by Maurer Faculty

Federal district courts have viewed the Civil Justice Reform Act of 1990 as a mandate to adopt procedural rules inconsistent with existing law. But in this article, Professor Robel argues that the Act neither compels nor authorizes such local deviations. Citing examples from reforms underway in district courts nationwide, Professor Robel contends that courts' assertions of broad rulemaking authority rest on a misreading of the Act and of the compromise between Congress and the judiciary that led to its passage. Professor Robel cautions that the goal of national uniformity underlying the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure should not be compromised ...


Book Review. Civil Procedure: Other Disciplines, Globalization, And Simple Gifts, Gene R. Shreve Jan 1994

Book Review. Civil Procedure: Other Disciplines, Globalization, And Simple Gifts, Gene R. Shreve

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Reform Aspirations Of The Complex Litigation Project, Gene R. Shreve Jan 1994

Reform Aspirations Of The Complex Litigation Project, Gene R. Shreve

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Limitation Of Legal Malpractice Actions: Defining Actual Injury And The Problem Of Simultaneous Litigation, Tyler T. Ochoa, Andrew Wilstrich Jan 1994

Limitation Of Legal Malpractice Actions: Defining Actual Injury And The Problem Of Simultaneous Litigation, Tyler T. Ochoa, Andrew Wilstrich

Faculty Publications

In this article, we will first review the development of the "actual injury" tolling provision in California, from its judicial adoption in 1971 to its legislative adoption in 1977. Second, we will explore the policies underlying the legal malpractice statute of limitation and the countervailing policies that may make delayed accrual or tolling desirable in situations involving simultaneous litigation. Third, we will examine case law applying the "actual injury" tolling provision to various fact situations and analyze potential legal solutions to the problem of defining "actual injury," including the doctrine of equitable tolling. Finally, we will demonstrate how the doctrine ...


Civil Justice Reform In The United States — Opportunity For Learning From 'Civilized' European Procedure Instead Of Continued Isolation?, Ernst C. Stiefel, James Maxeiner Jan 1994

Civil Justice Reform In The United States — Opportunity For Learning From 'Civilized' European Procedure Instead Of Continued Isolation?, Ernst C. Stiefel, James Maxeiner

All Faculty Scholarship

This article reports on present and past efforts at civil justice reform in the United States and assesses the opportunities for learning from Continental models. European jurists have long urged that their American colleagues consider using continental approaches in dealing with the serious problems that afflict the American system of civil justice. A few years back, our colleague Kötz noted that "If there is a desire to reform American civil procedure, either by making changes within the adversary system or by developing alternative methods of dispute resolution, the Continental experience may be well worth studying."


Halting Devolution Or Bleak To The Future? Subrin's New-Old Procedure As A Possible Antidote To Dreyfuss's "Tolstoy Problem", Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 1994

Halting Devolution Or Bleak To The Future? Subrin's New-Old Procedure As A Possible Antidote To Dreyfuss's "Tolstoy Problem", Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

Professors Rochelle Dreyfuss and Stephen Subrin first presented their ideas on the 1993 Amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (Civil Rules) at the 1994 Annual Meeting of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) in a program titled, “The 1993 Discovery Amendments: Evolution, Revolution, or Devolution?” After the program, I was left with the depressing view that the answer was devolution, which is defined as a “retrograde evolution,” or “degeneration.” Dreyfuss provides a detailed but succinct review of the changes in discovery occasioned by the new rules as well as a vantage point for assessing the social and ...


Pretrial Case Management Under The Amended Rules: Too Many Words For A Good Idea, Michael E. Tigar Jan 1994

Pretrial Case Management Under The Amended Rules: Too Many Words For A Good Idea, Michael E. Tigar

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


What Happens When Mediation Is Institutionalized?: To The Parties, Practitioners And Host Institutions, James J. Alfini, John Barkai, Robert A. Baruch Bush, Michele Hermann, Jonathan Hyman, Kimberlee Kovach, Carol B. Liebman, Sharon Press, Leonard Riskin Jan 1994

What Happens When Mediation Is Institutionalized?: To The Parties, Practitioners And Host Institutions, James J. Alfini, John Barkai, Robert A. Baruch Bush, Michele Hermann, Jonathan Hyman, Kimberlee Kovach, Carol B. Liebman, Sharon Press, Leonard Riskin

Faculty Scholarship

The Alternative Dispute Resolution Section of the Association of American Law Schools presented a program, at the 1994 AALS Conference, on the institutionalization of mediation – through court-connected programs and otherwise. The topic is an important one, because this phenomenon has become increasingly common. Moreover, the topic seemed especially appropriate for the 1994 program, since Florida – the host state for the conference – was one of the first states to adopt a comprehensive statute providing for court-ordered mediation (at the trial judge’s option) in civil disputes of all kinds. The move toward institutionalizing mediation has raised many questions, and the program ...


The Vanishing Precedent: Eduardo Meets Vacatur, Jill E. Fisch Jan 1994

The Vanishing Precedent: Eduardo Meets Vacatur, Jill E. Fisch

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Discovery Cost Allocation: Comment On Cooter And Rubinfeld, Edward H. Cooper Jan 1994

Discovery Cost Allocation: Comment On Cooter And Rubinfeld, Edward H. Cooper

Articles

Discovery practice continues to be the single most troubling element of contemporary procedure. To be sure, the system seems to work well in a high proportion of all federal cases. The proportion may seem astonishingly high in relation to the amount of attention devoted to discovery. The discovery problems that occur in a relatively small proportion of the federal caseload, however, impose serious burdens on the parties and the court system. Every proposal that addresses discovery "abuse" deserves serious attention. These comments focus on the discovery abuse portion of the paper by Cooter and Rubinfeld. Questions are posed that may ...