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1993

Faculty Articles

St. Mary's University School of Law

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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Regrettable Rebirth Of The Two-Grant Doctrine In Texas Deed Construction, Laura H. Burney Jan 1993

The Regrettable Rebirth Of The Two-Grant Doctrine In Texas Deed Construction, Laura H. Burney

Faculty Articles

Deed construction has been a perennial task for courts since the Statute of Uses accorded legal approval to written transfers of land in 1536. Unfortunately, two Texas cases, Luckel v. White and Jupiter Oil Co. v. Snow, may signal the rebirth of the dubious two-grant doctrine, which had seen its demise in Alford v. Krum. Under this theory, a multi-clause deed is construed as making separate grants of different types of interests in a particular tract of property or varying sizes of one interest at different times.

The ramifications of the holdings in Luckel and Jupiter Oil expose the inappropriateness …


Face At The Bottom Of The Well (Book Review), Willy E. Rice Jan 1993

Face At The Bottom Of The Well (Book Review), Willy E. Rice

Faculty Articles

No abstract provided.


Constitutional Law And The Myth Of The Great Judge, Michael S. Ariens Jan 1993

Constitutional Law And The Myth Of The Great Judge, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

One of the enduring myths of American history, including constitutional history, is that of the “Great Man” or “Great Woman.” The idea is that, to understand the history of America, one needs to understand the impact made by Great Men and Women whose actions affected the course of history. In political history, one assays the development of the United States through the lives of great Americans, from the “Founders” to Abraham Lincoln to John F. Kennedy. Similarly, in constitutional history, the story is told through key figures, the “Great Judges,” from John Marshall to Oliver Wendell Holmes to Earl Warren. …


Jag Corps Poised For New Defense Missions: Human Rights Training In Peru, Jeffrey F. Addicott Jan 1993

Jag Corps Poised For New Defense Missions: Human Rights Training In Peru, Jeffrey F. Addicott

Faculty Articles

The National Command Authority has cited the dissolution of the Soviet Union as cause for the United States Military to expand its role. In addition to its traditional role of fighting wars, the military will take on new nontraditional roles promoting human rights and the rule of law throughout the world. These new military missions will include peacekeeping operations, humanitarian interventions, disaster relief missions, counter-drug activities, and nation-building activities.

As part of this initiative, the United States Judge Advocate General’s Corps (JAGC) provides legal assistance to the militaries of several emerging and struggling democracies. A number of foreign armies and …