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1993

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A Selective Bibliography On The Endangered Species Act, Kristin Cheney Jun 1993

A Selective Bibliography On The Endangered Species Act, Kristin Cheney

Faculty Articles

Since its passage in 1973, the Endangered Species Act (ESA) has been the subject of much discussion and numerous publications. This bibliography is not an exhaustive treatment of the topic, but rather concentrates on monographs published from 1980 forward and includes only post-1988 journal articles. To aid the reader in locating relevant references, the journal articles are organized into the subcategories of (1) law and regulations, (2) litigation, and (3) international and extraterritorial.


Outing In The Time Of Aids: Legal And Ethical Considerations, John F. Hernandez Apr 1993

Outing In The Time Of Aids: Legal And Ethical Considerations, John F. Hernandez

Faculty Articles

No abstract provided.


The Three Uses Of The Law: A Protestant Source Of The Purposes Of Criminal Punishment, John Witte Jr., Thomas C. Arthur Jan 1993

The Three Uses Of The Law: A Protestant Source Of The Purposes Of Criminal Punishment, John Witte Jr., Thomas C. Arthur

Faculty Articles

In this article, we focus on the interaction of Anglo-American criminal law and Protestant theological doctrine. We argue (1) that the sixteenth-century Protestant theological doctrine of the uses of moral law provided a critical analogue, if not antecedent to the classic Anglo-American doctrine of the purposes of criminal law and punishment; and (2) that this theological doctrine provides important signposts to the development of a more integrated moral theory of criminal law and punishment in late twentieth century America.

Part One of this Article sets out the theological doctrine of the "civil," "theological," and "educational" uses of the moral law, …


Twenty-Five Years Of Strict Product Liability Law: The Transformation And Present Meaning Of Section 402a, Charles E. Cantú Jan 1993

Twenty-Five Years Of Strict Product Liability Law: The Transformation And Present Meaning Of Section 402a, Charles E. Cantú

Faculty Articles

Twenty-five years ago, the American Law Institute had just published Section 402A of the Restatement (Second) of Torts. As a consequence of this new and innovative rule, the theory of recovery in the area of defective products was expanded from a system based on principles of negligence and warranty to one that also included the doctrine of strict product liability. The promulgation of Section 402A marked the beginning of a growing revolution in the field of plaintiff-oriented litigation in which parties and courts frequently center their inquiry upon the defectiveness of the product and issues related thereto, rather than on …


Ordinary Sacraments, Emily A. Hartigan Jan 1993

Ordinary Sacraments, Emily A. Hartigan

Faculty Articles

Richard Parker is a true force in constitutional thought, and his Populist commitment finds fertile landscape. However, there is something missing from his account of populism—the role of reflection and the fear of God in human affairs. Parker never deals with the fact that “the people” believe in God. Despite the intellectualist drive to separate God from politics, most Americans do not maintain such a wall. Whether under a stultifying separationist doctrine or in a more open pluralism, the people are God-fearing in an increasingly fractured and fascinating way—they are recognizably, fundamentally religious. Parker advocates being in touch with what …


Boyles V. Kerr: The Wrong Decision At The Right Time: Implications For Mental Anguish Damages Under The Dtpa, Charles E. Cantú, Jared Woodfull V Jan 1993

Boyles V. Kerr: The Wrong Decision At The Right Time: Implications For Mental Anguish Damages Under The Dtpa, Charles E. Cantú, Jared Woodfull V

Faculty Articles

Mental anguish jurisprudence has witnessed a tumultuous evolution. Consumer law, as codified in the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act, has been uniquely impacted by the evolving law of mental anguish.

Recently, the Texas Supreme Court reaffirmed the standard for recovery of mental anguish damages under the DTPA. In the case of Boyles v. Kerr, the Texas Supreme Court had the opportunity to reconcile mental anguish damages under the DTPA with mental anguish jurisprudence. However, instead of aggressively recognizing one’s interest in their emotional well-being, the court retreated, reversing almost a decade of mental anguish jurisprudence.

This recently reaffirmed standard for …


A New Look At An Old Conundrum: The Determinative Test For The Hybrid Sales/Service Transaction Under Section 402a Of The Restatement (Second) Of Torts, Charles E. Cantú Jan 1993

A New Look At An Old Conundrum: The Determinative Test For The Hybrid Sales/Service Transaction Under Section 402a Of The Restatement (Second) Of Torts, Charles E. Cantú

Faculty Articles

Historically, the concept of strict tort liability was confined to two areas: injuries resulting from dangerous activities, and harm inflicted by wild and/or dangerous animals. However, in 1963, the California Supreme Court held in Greenman v. Yuba Power Products that the theory of strict liability in tort also included products. Then, in 1965, The Restatement (Second) of Torts adopted Section 402A and endorsed the theory of Greenman that strict liability was available as a distinct cause of action in litigation involving injuries caused by defective products.

Though there was some initial confusion associated with the application of some of the …


Jag Corps Poised For New Defense Missions: Human Rights Training In Peru, Jeffrey F. Addicott Jan 1993

Jag Corps Poised For New Defense Missions: Human Rights Training In Peru, Jeffrey F. Addicott

Faculty Articles

The National Command Authority has cited the dissolution of the Soviet Union as cause for the United States Military to expand its role. In addition to its traditional role of fighting wars, the military will take on new nontraditional roles promoting human rights and the rule of law throughout the world. These new military missions will include peacekeeping operations, humanitarian interventions, disaster relief missions, counter-drug activities, and nation-building activities.

As part of this initiative, the United States Judge Advocate General’s Corps (JAGC) provides legal assistance to the militaries of several emerging and struggling democracies. A number of foreign armies and …


The Lord In The Law: Reflections On A Catholic Law School, Aloysius A. Leopold Jan 1993

The Lord In The Law: Reflections On A Catholic Law School, Aloysius A. Leopold

Faculty Articles

The symbiosis between law and morality has played a major role in universities since their formation and is critical to our moral and legal future. Each is dependent on the other, and an attempt to separate the two will seal the fate of our society as a whole. The Catholic law school must ensure that this symbiosis is never broken, but is fulfilled by incorporating relevant new courses and by teaching present classes in light of the Catholic message. Further, Catholic defense clinics should be offered to enrich the lives of others, and priests and nuns should be made available …


The Right To Health Care In The United States, Ken Wing Jan 1993

The Right To Health Care In The United States, Ken Wing

Faculty Articles

This article provides an analysis of the history of constitutional interpretation in the United States, and reveals that any right Americans have to health care is a political rather than constitutional right.


Labor, Loyalty, And The Corporate Campaign, Melinda J. Branscomb Jan 1993

Labor, Loyalty, And The Corporate Campaign, Melinda J. Branscomb

Faculty Articles

This article critically assesses the disloyalty test, offering badly needed guidance in this murky and risky area of labor law. Part I provides an overview of the relevant portions of the Act and the problems facing the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB or the Board) and the courts as these decision makers interpret section 7 law. It reviews the early section 7 exceptions, the creation of the disloyalty test, and the aftermath of this new exception, and it introduces a number of problems left as Jefferson Standard's legacy. Part II discusses the analytical inconsistency applied in disloyalty doctrine analysis and …


The Psychology Of First Amendment Scholarship: A Reply, David Skover, Ronald Collins Jan 1993

The Psychology Of First Amendment Scholarship: A Reply, David Skover, Ronald Collins

Faculty Articles

This essay was written as an afterword to the Colloquy entitled The First Amendment in a Commercial Culture, as a reply to commentaries on "Commerce & Communication" authored by Leo Bogart (advertising expert), Sut Jhally (professor of communications), Alex Kozinski (federal appellate judge) & Stuart Banner (attorney), and Rodney Smolla (law professor). The authors, Professors Skover and Collins, had hoped that Commerce & Communication would prompt new debate and discussion about certain First Amendment issues. However, judging from thier colleagues' reactions, there may well be more of the former than the latter. But in the scheme of things, who's to …


Praetorianism & Common Law In Post-Colonial Settings: Judicial Responses To Constitutional Breakdowns In Pakistan, Tayyab Mahmud Jan 1993

Praetorianism & Common Law In Post-Colonial Settings: Judicial Responses To Constitutional Breakdowns In Pakistan, Tayyab Mahmud

Faculty Articles

The successive constitutional crises that confronted the Pakistani courts were not of their own making. But the doctrinally inconsistent, judicially inappropriate, and politically timid responses fashioned by these courts ultimately undermined constitutional governance. When confronted with the question of the validity and scope of extra constitutional power, the courts vacillated between Hans Kelsen's theory of revolutionary validity, Hugo Grotius's theory of implied mandate, and an expansive construction of the doctrine of state necessity. A more principled and realistic response would have been to declare the validity of extra constitutional regimes a nonjusticiable political question. Besides ensuring doctrinal consistency, a refusal …


Bringing Law To Sentencing, David Boerner Jan 1993

Bringing Law To Sentencing, David Boerner

Faculty Articles

This article outlines the evolution of sentencing standards over the years. It identifies several key events in the progression toward a more lawful approach to sentencing.


Surprised By Law, Emily A. Hartigan Jan 1993

Surprised By Law, Emily A. Hartigan

Faculty Articles

This year’s Association of American Law Schools convention provided a genuinely engaging panel discussion between Michael Sandel and Judge Stephen Reinhardt. Michael Sandel, Harvard philosopher of community and the “encumbered self,” delivered his defense of an ethics of appreciation which goes beyond mere toleration, arguing for honor for persons rather than mere dignity. Reinhardt countered by characterizing Sandel’s stuff as the sort of academic theorizing which has nothing much to do with the world, and raised with almost unconscious elegance the main issue, and a deeply troubling concrete dilemma.

Reinhardt noted that Sandel’s portrait of the person did not work …


Derridoz Law Written In Our Heart/Land: “The Powers Retained By The People”, Emily A. Hartigan Jan 1993

Derridoz Law Written In Our Heart/Land: “The Powers Retained By The People”, Emily A. Hartigan

Faculty Articles

Section 26 of the Nebraska Constitution, much like everything affirmative that humans do, is immediately flawed. The flaw sits literally right below this heartfelt declaration of the people’s sovereignty, in an annotation provided for section 26 in the Revised Statutes of Nebraska. This annotation cites State v. Moores, but recites also that the case was overruled, which is wrong for a number of reasons. First, not only does this conflict with other annotations to the same Bill of Rights citing the very same case, but it also ignores the inadequacy of the supposed “overruling” and the existence of an explicit …


The Regrettable Rebirth Of The Two-Grant Doctrine In Texas Deed Construction, Laura H. Burney Jan 1993

The Regrettable Rebirth Of The Two-Grant Doctrine In Texas Deed Construction, Laura H. Burney

Faculty Articles

Deed construction has been a perennial task for courts since the Statute of Uses accorded legal approval to written transfers of land in 1536. Unfortunately, two Texas cases, Luckel v. White and Jupiter Oil Co. v. Snow, may signal the rebirth of the dubious two-grant doctrine, which had seen its demise in Alford v. Krum. Under this theory, a multi-clause deed is construed as making separate grants of different types of interests in a particular tract of property or varying sizes of one interest at different times.

The ramifications of the holdings in Luckel and Jupiter Oil expose the inappropriateness …


Woman's Ghetto Within The Legal Profession, Marilyn Berger, Kari A. Robinson Jan 1993

Woman's Ghetto Within The Legal Profession, Marilyn Berger, Kari A. Robinson

Faculty Articles

In this article, we explore how the historical, stereotypical images of women as the timid, delicate caretaker shaped and continue to shape women's roles in the work force. As women entered the workplace, they became nurses, not doctors; dental hygienists, not dentists; paralegals, not lawyers; and kindergarten teachers, not university professors. This pattern persists today. We examine the professions to show how women's nurturing caretaker image has resulted in special niches within the professions, positions which perpetuate women in caretaker roles. Specifically, we examine the legal profession and probe the contemporary barricades erected to channel women into positions that fulfill …


Postmodern 'Progress': Reconsidering The Copyright And Patent Power, Margaret Chon Jan 1993

Postmodern 'Progress': Reconsidering The Copyright And Patent Power, Margaret Chon

Faculty Articles

This article undertakes a postmodern analysis of the term ‘Progress’ in the Constitution’s Copyright Clause, finding stewarding the production of knowledge is integral to the clause. First, by deconstructing the linear, forward assumption entailing Progress. As technology concentrates, Progress entails distributional fairness and decentralized control over knowledge. Relying on the writings of the Founders and recent copyright decisions, this article does not limit postmodernism to a theory recognizing that words have multiple meanings, instead it argues that the Copyright Clause transforms the idea of knowledge to a common resource like water and air, and places knowledge into a public trust, …


Rethinking Advocacy Training, Marilyn Berger, John Mitchell Jan 1993

Rethinking Advocacy Training, Marilyn Berger, John Mitchell

Faculty Articles

This article examines advocacy teaching methodology and how to impart to students and beginning attorneys the methods and approaches that experienced trial lawyers use.


The Role Of The Legislature In Guidelines Sentencing In The "Other Washington", David Boerner Jan 1993

The Role Of The Legislature In Guidelines Sentencing In The "Other Washington", David Boerner

Faculty Articles

Washington's legislature crafted a sentencing system which structures but does not eliminate discretionary decisions affecting sentences. Washington has a Sentencing Guidelines Commission which functions as an agent of the legislature and not as an independent actor. Data collected by the Sentencing Guidelines Commission since 1985 demonstrate the effectiveness of Washington's sentencing guidelines in translating the legislature's sentencing policy judgments into reality. The legislature's role in formulating and refining sentencing policies is examined in detail, as well as Washington's Sentencing Reform Act of 1981 and its effect on sentencing.


In A Different Register: The Pragmatics Of Powerlessness In Police Interrogation, Janet Ainsworth Jan 1993

In A Different Register: The Pragmatics Of Powerlessness In Police Interrogation, Janet Ainsworth

Faculty Articles

In a majority of states, a suspect is deemed to have invoked the Miranda right to counsel only if the suspect's request is clear and unequivocal. This doctrine is challenged as an insufficient protection of constitutional rights. It is argued that courts should treat even ambiguous and equivocal requests as per se effective innovations of the right to counsel.


Sex Stories: A Review Of Sex And Reason, Margaret Chon Jan 1993

Sex Stories: A Review Of Sex And Reason, Margaret Chon

Faculty Articles

In this review of Sex Stories-A Review Of Sex And Reason by Richard A. Posner, Professor Chon explores the implications of Posner’s exuberant faith in bioeconomic reasoning, unalloyed by any of the late modernist or postmodernist challenges to the nature and limits of science and its transformative potential. In doing so, Professor Chon attempts three things. First, she discusses some of his sociobiological assertions in order to demonstrate that evolutionary biology consists of a much richer and more contradictory set of assertions than Posner would have us believe. Even within the empiricist framework, therefore, Posner leaves out many stories that …


Toward An Asian American Legal Scholarship: Critical Race Theory, Post-Structuralism, And Narrative Space, Robert S. Chang Jan 1993

Toward An Asian American Legal Scholarship: Critical Race Theory, Post-Structuralism, And Narrative Space, Robert S. Chang

Faculty Articles

As Asian Americans join the legal academy in growing numbers, they change the face of the academy and challenge its traditional legal doctrines. The author announces an "'Asian American Moment" in the legal academy and an opportunity to reverse the pattern of discrimination against Asian Americans. Traditional civil rights work and current critical race scholarship fail to address the unique issues for Asian Americans, including nativistic racism and the model minority myth. Space must be made in the legal academy for an Asian American Legal Scholarship and the narratives of Asian Americans. The author asserts that the rational-empirical mode is …


Abortion And The Pied Piper Of Compromise, Annette E. Clark Jan 1993

Abortion And The Pied Piper Of Compromise, Annette E. Clark

Faculty Articles

In this article, Professor Clark offers a detailed analysis of the controversy among legal scholars which has long surrounded the issue of legal regulation of abortion. Professor Clark begins by focusing on a recent book by Professor Laurence Tribe, Abortion: The Clash of Absolutes. She argues that although Tribe claims to seek a compromise solution to the abortion problem, he fails in this pursuit both because he does not truly search for compromise and because he is unwilling to explore intermediate moral or legal positions that are not acceptable to either the pro-choice or pro-life movements. In contrast, Professor Clark …


Commerce & Communication, David Skover, Ronald Collins Jan 1993

Commerce & Communication, David Skover, Ronald Collins

Faculty Articles

As the lead piece in a Colloquy entitled The First Amendment in a Commercial Culture, this article argues that, in our culture of advanced capitalism, public discourse cannot significantly be separated from the influences of commercialism. To understand the First Amendment, we must look beyond cases and commentary to the actual ways in which our culture communicates about and through commodities. We must think less about the marketplace of ideas and more about the marketing of items.


Blackmailers, Bribe Takers, And The Second Paradox, Sidney Delong Jan 1993

Blackmailers, Bribe Takers, And The Second Paradox, Sidney Delong

Faculty Articles

An adequate theoretical justification for the prohibition of blackmail should explain both of its paradoxes. However, a review of contemporary theories of blackmail shows that they are able neither to explain why blackmail is criminalized nor to rationalize the different treatment of blackmail and bribery. This review suggests that the paradoxes of blackmail may not yield to rational analysis. In contrast to deductive analyses premised on rights or economics, this paper offers an account of bribery and blackmail that is premised on their different social meanings. The author suggests that the legal and moral treatment of bribery and blackmail spring …


Face At The Bottom Of The Well (Book Review), Willy E. Rice Jan 1993

Face At The Bottom Of The Well (Book Review), Willy E. Rice

Faculty Articles

No abstract provided.


The More Things Change, The More They Stay The Same: The Employment-At-Will Doctrine In Texas, Bonita K. Roberts Jan 1993

The More Things Change, The More They Stay The Same: The Employment-At-Will Doctrine In Texas, Bonita K. Roberts

Faculty Articles

The Texas Legislature should reject the employment-at-will doctrine in Texas. A carefully crafted new law could be created through the assessment of both the Montana Wrongful Discharge from Employment Act and the Model Employment Termination Act (“META”), approved by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Law. Texas recognizes common-law and statutory exceptions to the employment-at-will doctrine. However, the statutory and common-law exceptions to the employment-at-will doctrine do not swallow the rule; instead, they constitute random, narrow efforts affording employees few protections while requiring employers to defend their decisions on a costly, piecemeal basis.

The Montana Employment Act protects …


Evolution And Revolution In Family Law, Victoria M. Mather Jan 1993

Evolution And Revolution In Family Law, Victoria M. Mather

Faculty Articles

Family law has significantly changed over the last twenty-five years, and certain areas will likely continue to change. Family law tends to follow, rather than lead, social upheaval and adjustment in family decisions and structures. The most important legal changes in family law are a result of massive shifts in American social, political, and economic constructs in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s.

Family law will continue to evolve because of three critical developments. First is the expansion of the concept of what constitutes a “family” in the modern context. Next is the treatment of children as autonomous individuals, separate and …