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Articles 1 - 13 of 13

Full-Text Articles in Law

Nothing Lasts Forever: Toward A Coherent Theory In American Preservation Law, Kathryn R.L. Rand Oct 1993

Nothing Lasts Forever: Toward A Coherent Theory In American Preservation Law, Kathryn R.L. Rand

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Part I of this Note examines Grégoire's liberty-based theory of preservation and discusses the three rationales that underlie his theory. Part II examines the development of preservation law in the United States, following it through three stages: patriotic inspiration, aesthetic merit, and community. Part III examines Italy's experience with preservation in order to identify and discuss several problems inherent in preservation law. Part IV suggests preservation rationales for courts and legislators to consider and identifies problems for them to avoid.


Apple Of Gold: Constitutionalism In Israel And The United States, Cynthia A.M. Stroman May 1993

Apple Of Gold: Constitutionalism In Israel And The United States, Cynthia A.M. Stroman

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Apple of Gold: Constitutionalism in Israel and the United States by Gary Jeffrey Jacobsohn


Antitrust In A World Of Interrelated Economies: The Interplay Between Antitrust And Trade Policies In The Us And The Eec, Alyssa A. Grikscheit May 1993

Antitrust In A World Of Interrelated Economies: The Interplay Between Antitrust And Trade Policies In The Us And The Eec, Alyssa A. Grikscheit

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Antitrust In a World of Interrelated Economies: The Interplay Between Antitrust and Trade Policies in the US and the EEC by Mário Marques Mendes


Administering Justice In A Consensus-Based Society, Koichiro Fujikura May 1993

Administering Justice In A Consensus-Based Society, Koichiro Fujikura

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Authority Without Power: Law and the Japanese Paradox by John O. Haley


Withdrawal And Expulsion In Germany: A Comparative Perspective On The "Close Corporation Problem", Hugh T. Scogin Jr. Jan 1993

Withdrawal And Expulsion In Germany: A Comparative Perspective On The "Close Corporation Problem", Hugh T. Scogin Jr.

Michigan Journal of International Law

This article will examine the German legal system's experience with fashioning remedies for the "close corporation problem" and the underlying concepts that have shaped these remedies. Part I will trace the growth of the doctrines of withdrawal and expulsion in the context of Germany's troubled history. Part II will compare German and U.S. approaches on both practical and conceptual levels. On one level, the focus of the article is narrow. It deals with specific, technical solutions to only the most extreme examples of the close corporation problem. Such cases are not frequently litigated. Their doctrines do, however, constitute default rules …


Presidential Systems In Stress: Emergency Powers In Argentina And The United States, William C. Banks, Alejandro D. Carrió Jan 1993

Presidential Systems In Stress: Emergency Powers In Argentina And The United States, William C. Banks, Alejandro D. Carrió

Michigan Journal of International Law

This article offers three comparative insights. First, it concludes that comparative inquiries into presidential systems may be useful for those interested in constitutional government, regardless of historical, cultural, or other contextual differences among nations. Thus, nations with presidentialist constitutional systems may have common problems because of the institutional presidency. The article maintains that our presidential systems are in such states of disrepair that a fundamental reinvigoration of the legislative and judicial branches is required, so that government may better serve important constitutional values in our nations.


The Emerging International Consensus As To Criminal Procedure Rules, Craig M. Bradley Jan 1993

The Emerging International Consensus As To Criminal Procedure Rules, Craig M. Bradley

Michigan Journal of International Law

This article will demonstrate that these general claims, as well as certain observations about specific countries, were, with one significant exception, substantially wrong when they were written. More importantly, due to significant developments in several countries in the years since those reports came out, they are even more wrong now. That is, not only have the U.S. concepts of pre-interrogation warnings to suspects, a search warrant requirement, and the use of an exclusionary remedy to deter police misconduct been widely adopted, but in many cases other countries have gone beyond the U.S. requirements.


Participation And Litigation Rights Of Environmental Associations In Europe: Current Legal Situation And Practical Experience, David A. Wirth Jan 1993

Participation And Litigation Rights Of Environmental Associations In Europe: Current Legal Situation And Practical Experience, David A. Wirth

Michigan Journal of International Law

Review of the book edited by Martin Führ and Gerhard Roller.


Books Received, Michigan Journal Of International Law Jan 1993

Books Received, Michigan Journal Of International Law

Michigan Journal of International Law

List of books received by the Journal.


Reporting The Truth And Setting The Record Straight: An Analysis Of U.S. And Japanese Libel Laws, Ellen M. Smith Jan 1993

Reporting The Truth And Setting The Record Straight: An Analysis Of U.S. And Japanese Libel Laws, Ellen M. Smith

Michigan Journal of International Law

This Note argues that U.S. courts and lawmakers should adopt some aspects of Japanese libel law. Part I compares the balances struck in U.S. and Japanese libel law between promoting press freedoms and protecting individual interests. Part II focuses on the extent to which each system succeeds in addressing the objectives of encouraging aggressive, accurate reporting, and compensating libel victims. Finally, Part III proposes a new U.S. libel standard that would adopt, with some modifications, key elements of Japanese libel law without running afoul of established U.S. constitutional requirements.


Cause For Cautious Celebration: Hungarian Post-Communist Environmental Reform, Karen S. Libertiny Jan 1993

Cause For Cautious Celebration: Hungarian Post-Communist Environmental Reform, Karen S. Libertiny

Michigan Journal of International Law

In October 1989, the Hungarian Communist regime collapsed and was replaced by a democratic government. This new government was confronted with a visible and grave concern: environmental degradation. In just three years, the new Hungarian government, sometimes of its own impetus, sometimes at the prodding of environmentalists and foreign governments, has taken tremendous steps toward establishing palpable environmental legislation. More importantly, it has created an administrative and information-gathering infrastructure capable of sustaining a cohesive system of environmental protection initiatives. Although the path to further progress is littered with obstacles, this East European country has proven itself a worthy warrior in …


South Korea: Implementation And Application Of Human Rights Covenants, Suk Tae Lee Jan 1993

South Korea: Implementation And Application Of Human Rights Covenants, Suk Tae Lee

Michigan Journal of International Law

Under article 40 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), the State Party undertakes to submit reports on the measures it has adopted which give effect to the rights recognized in the ICCPR and demonstrate the progress it has made in granting its citizens the enjoyment of those rights. The report was examined by the HRC in July 1992 and will be discussed in Part I of this article. The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) also requires State Parties to submit reports, but the initial report of the South Korean government has not …


Empowering The Russian Consumer In A Market Economy, James P. Nehf Jan 1993

Empowering The Russian Consumer In A Market Economy, James P. Nehf

Michigan Journal of International Law

One purpose of this article is to examine how the legislative product of a declining socialist state will benefit Russian consumers during the unusual circumstances characterizing the period of market transformation. A second purpose is to familiarize Western consumerists with the decidedly pro-consumer features of the Russian law. Part I analyzes the consumer law's provisions that elevate the legal status of consumers when they purchase goods and services. Part II examines the legislation from a different perspective - as a set of legal norms affecting the operation of consumer markets generally. Part III discusses the enforcement mechanisms established in the …