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Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Langugage And Culture (Not To Say Race) Of Peremptory Challenges, Sheri Lynn Johnson Oct 1993

The Langugage And Culture (Not To Say Race) Of Peremptory Challenges, Sheri Lynn Johnson

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Morgan V. Illinois: An Attempt To Provide Equality In The Selection Of Capital Sentencing Jurors, Tracy A. Peterson Jan 1993

Morgan V. Illinois: An Attempt To Provide Equality In The Selection Of Capital Sentencing Jurors, Tracy A. Peterson

Villanova Law Review

No abstract provided.


Some Steps Between Attitudes And Verdicts, Phoebe C. Ellsworth Jan 1993

Some Steps Between Attitudes And Verdicts, Phoebe C. Ellsworth

Book Chapters

Most research that has attempted to predict verdict preferences on the basis of stable juror characteristics, such as attitudes and personality traits, has found that individual differences among jurors are not very useful predictors, accounting for only a small proportion of the variance in verdict choices. Some commentators have therefore concluded that verdicts are overwhelmingly accounted for by "the weight of the evidence," and that differences among jurors have negligible effects. But there is a paradox here: In most cases the weight of the evidence is insufficient to produce firstballot unanimity in the jury (Hans & Vidmar, 1986; Hastie, Penrod, …


Peremptory Challenges: Free Strikes No More, H. Patrick Furman Jan 1993

Peremptory Challenges: Free Strikes No More, H. Patrick Furman

Publications

No abstract provided.


Some Worries About Sentencing Guidelines, William T. Pizzi Jan 1993

Some Worries About Sentencing Guidelines, William T. Pizzi

Publications

No abstract provided.


Rights Held Hostage: Race, Ideology And The Peremptory Challenge, Kenneth B. Nunn Jan 1993

Rights Held Hostage: Race, Ideology And The Peremptory Challenge, Kenneth B. Nunn

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Article addresses the Supreme Court's application of the Equal Protection Clause to the selection of juries in criminal trials. Focusing on Black-white relations, it takes the position that efforts to eliminate racial discrimination in jury selection are successful only to the extent that they also eliminate the result of the discrimination- racial subjugation of Blacks through the criminal justice process. By this measure, the Supreme Court's recent jury selection cases are an abject failure.