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1991

Jurisprudence

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Institution
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Articles 1 - 26 of 26

Full-Text Articles in Law

Liberalism, Community, And State Borders, Lea Brilmayer Sep 1991

Liberalism, Community, And State Borders, Lea Brilmayer

Duke Law Journal

No abstract provided.


What's Left?, Guyora Binder Jul 1991

What's Left?, Guyora Binder

Journal Articles

Addressing the future of radical politics at the end of the cold war, this article offers a reconstruction of radical theory around the goal of enabling collaborative self-realization through participatory democratic politics. It offers an interpretation of the radical tradition as defined by a view of human nature as a cultural artifact, and a conception of liberation as the self-conscious transformation of human nature. It proceeds to critique radical theory’s traditional focus on revolution as the means of radical transformation. Distinguishing instrumental and self-expressive conceptions of transformation it critiques revolutionary processes as tending to reproduce instrumental culture. It offers democratic …


The World In Our Courts, Stephen B. Burbank May 1991

The World In Our Courts, Stephen B. Burbank

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Carey Law

No abstract provided.


Approaching Aliens: A Plea For Jurisprudential Recovery As A Theoretical Introduction To (Ex)Socialist Legal Systems, Ivan L. Padjen May 1991

Approaching Aliens: A Plea For Jurisprudential Recovery As A Theoretical Introduction To (Ex)Socialist Legal Systems, Ivan L. Padjen

Dalhousie Law Journal

It might be wise to stop here. Even a reader who is sympathetic to jurisprudential imagination must regard the communicable part of my title with considerable misgiving. For he or she can hardly be unaware of the double jeopardy in which the general theorist of law places himself when dealing with socialist legal systems. The first has been aptly described by Alasdair MacIntyre in his parable of a man who aspired to be the author of the general theory of holes.' The moral of the story, that the concept of a hole is a poor foundation for a general theory …


Not So Cold An Eye: Richard Posner's Pragmatism, Jason S. Johnston Apr 1991

Not So Cold An Eye: Richard Posner's Pragmatism, Jason S. Johnston

Vanderbilt Law Review

Over the past twenty odd years, Judge Richard Posner has established himself as one of the most creative and influential thinkers in the history of American law. His work divides into two parts: the prejudicial corpus, which is devoted almost entirely to the comprehensive economic analysis of law,' and the postjudicial corpus, which treats issues involving what may be called the theory of judging and courts--that is, the normative theory of how judges should decide cases and how courts should be organized. This division is rough and wavering, for Posner's work prior to his appointment to the federal bench often …


Towards A Communitarian Theory Of Responsibility: Bearing The Burden For The Unintended, Rosa Eckstein Mar 1991

Towards A Communitarian Theory Of Responsibility: Bearing The Burden For The Unintended, Rosa Eckstein

University of Miami Law Review

No abstract provided.


Kibitzers, Fuzzies, And Apes Without Tails: Pragmatism And The Art Of Conversation In Legal Theory, Robert Justin Lipkin Jan 1991

Kibitzers, Fuzzies, And Apes Without Tails: Pragmatism And The Art Of Conversation In Legal Theory, Robert Justin Lipkin

Robert Justin Lipkin

No abstract provided.


Generosity: A Duty Without A Right, Richard Stith Jan 1991

Generosity: A Duty Without A Right, Richard Stith

Law Faculty Publications

The rhetoric of rights permeates and dominates the American legal thought today. Even ethics is often considered to involve fundamentally a mutual respect for "moral rights." Understanding human rights is taken to be a sufficient condition for knowing how we do and should order our life together.


"I Vote This Way Because I'M Wrong": The Supreme Court Justice As Epimenides, John M. Rogers Jan 1991

"I Vote This Way Because I'M Wrong": The Supreme Court Justice As Epimenides, John M. Rogers

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

Possibly the most unsettling phenomenon in the Supreme Court's 1988 term was Justice White's decision to vote contrary to his own exhaustively stated reasoning in Pennsylvania v. Union Gas Co. His unexplained decision to vote against the result of his own analysis lends support to those who argue that law, or at least constitutional law, is fundamentally indeterminate. Proponents of the indeterminacy argument sometimes base their position on the allegedly inescapable inconsistency of decisions made by a multi-member court. There is an answer to the inconsistency argument, but it founders if justices sometimes vote, without explanation, on the basis of …


The Concept Of Offensiveness In Establishment And Free Exercise Jurisprudence, William P. Marshall Jan 1991

The Concept Of Offensiveness In Establishment And Free Exercise Jurisprudence, William P. Marshall

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Reconsidering The Employment Contract Exclusion In Section 1 Of The Federal Arbitration Act: Correcting The Judiciary's Failure Of Statutory Vision, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 1991

Reconsidering The Employment Contract Exclusion In Section 1 Of The Federal Arbitration Act: Correcting The Judiciary's Failure Of Statutory Vision, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

The Federal Arbitration Act (the Act), seeks to eliminate centuries of perceived judicial hostility toward arbitration agreements. The Act made written arbitration agreements involving interstate commerce specifically enforceable. It also provided a procedural structure for enforcing awards, which were protected through deferential judicial review. The Act intended to have a wide reach, employing a broad definition of commerce that has presumably grown in breadth along with the expansion of judicial notions of commerce. Although courts applied the Act in tentative and cautious fashion until the 1960's, arbitration gained momentum during the 1970's and the 1980's. Despite growing judicial enthusiasm for …


Fourth, Fifth, And Sixth Amendments, William E. Hellerstein Jan 1991

Fourth, Fifth, And Sixth Amendments, William E. Hellerstein

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Foreword: Postmodernism And Law, Pierre Schlag Jan 1991

Foreword: Postmodernism And Law, Pierre Schlag

Publications

No abstract provided.


Normativity And The Politics Of Form, Pierre Schlag Jan 1991

Normativity And The Politics Of Form, Pierre Schlag

Publications

No abstract provided.


Stances, Pierre Schlag Jan 1991

Stances, Pierre Schlag

Publications

No abstract provided.


The Problem Of The Subject, Pierre Schlag Jan 1991

The Problem Of The Subject, Pierre Schlag

Publications

No abstract provided.


The Ideal Of Liberty: A Comment On Michael H. V. Gerald D., Robin West Jan 1991

The Ideal Of Liberty: A Comment On Michael H. V. Gerald D., Robin West

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

What is the meaning and content of the "liberty" protected by the due process clause of the fourteenth amendment? In Michael H. v. Gerald D. Justices Brennan and Scalia spelled out what at first blush appear to be sharply contrasting understandings of the meaning of liberty and of the substantive limits liberty imposes on state action. Justice Scalia argued that the "liberty" protected by a substantive interpretation of due process is only the liberty to engage in activities historically protected against state intervention by firmly entrenched societal traditions. I will sometimes call this the "traditionalist" interpretation of liberty. Justice Brennan, …


Jurimetrics: The Meaning And Measurement Of Legal Sovereignty And Domestic Jurisdiction, Bin Cheng Jan 1991

Jurimetrics: The Meaning And Measurement Of Legal Sovereignty And Domestic Jurisdiction, Bin Cheng

University of Miami International and Comparative Law Review

No abstract provided.


Rights, Communities, And Tradition, Brian Slattery Jan 1991

Rights, Communities, And Tradition, Brian Slattery

Articles & Book Chapters

This paper argues that there is a close connection between basic human rights and communal bonds. It criticizes the philosophical views of Alan Gewirth and Alasdair MacIntyre, which in differing ways deny this connection.


Suicide And Justice, Arthur J. Jacobson Jan 1991

Suicide And Justice, Arthur J. Jacobson

Articles

No abstract provided.


Derrida, Law, Violence And The Paradox Of Justice, Michel Rosenfeld Jan 1991

Derrida, Law, Violence And The Paradox Of Justice, Michel Rosenfeld

Articles

No abstract provided.


Foreword, David Rudenstine Jan 1991

Foreword, David Rudenstine

Articles

No abstract provided.


Sinaitic And Noahide Law: Legal Pluralism In Jewish Law, Suzanne Last Stone Jan 1991

Sinaitic And Noahide Law: Legal Pluralism In Jewish Law, Suzanne Last Stone

Articles

No abstract provided.


The New Metaphysics: The Interpretive Turn In Jurisprudence, Stephen M. Feldman Dec 1990

The New Metaphysics: The Interpretive Turn In Jurisprudence, Stephen M. Feldman

Stephen M. Feldman

A debate between realists and antirealists has characterized western metaphysics. While metaphysical realists ground existence on an objective world, antirealists ground existence on a thinking subject and human culture. The argument in jurisprudence, as elsewhere, is that either we are capable of objective knowledge or we are doomed to free-floating subjectivism. We demand the impossible -- absolute objectivity -- to avoid the catastrophic -- unconstrained subjectivity. The interpretive turn attempts to move beyond this insoluble dilemma, the either/or of objectivity and subjectivity. Thus, in jurisprudence, the interpretive turn is well worth taking if only because it offers the possibility of …


Rights, Communities, And Tradition, Brian Slattery Dec 1990

Rights, Communities, And Tradition, Brian Slattery

Brian Slattery

This paper argues that there is a close connection between basic human rights and communal bonds.  It criticizes the philosophical views of Alan Gewirth and Alasdair MacIntyre, which in differing ways deny this connection.


Mr. Justice Antonin Scalia: A Renaissance Of Positivism And Predictability In Constitutional Adjudication, Beau James Brock Dec 1990

Mr. Justice Antonin Scalia: A Renaissance Of Positivism And Predictability In Constitutional Adjudication, Beau James Brock

Beau James Brock

This article pinpoints Justice Scalia's judicial methodology and contrasts it with the pragmatism of Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.