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Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in Law

Tribe's Judicious Feminism, Anita L. Allen Nov 1991

Tribe's Judicious Feminism, Anita L. Allen

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Canadian Tort Law: A Review For The Nineties, B T. Hill Oct 1991

Canadian Tort Law: A Review For The Nineties, B T. Hill

Dalhousie Law Journal

My purpose in writing this review follows from a tradition initiated by feminist scholars. My analysis of Canadian Tort Law. Cases, Notes and Materials begins with a survey of the casebook with commentary concerning its historical development as a casebook, focussing on instances where gender issues are raised. I then offer a critique concerning the lack of consideration and misappropriation of gender issues in the recently released 1990 edition of the casebook, using illustrative examples from the casebook and a selection of two feminists' critique of tort law. Some modest suggestions for improvement are made throughout the review, and the ...


Gender Justice Without Foundations, Marion Smiley May 1991

Gender Justice Without Foundations, Marion Smiley

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Feminism/Postmodernism edited by Linda J. Nicholson and Justice and the Politics of Difference by Iris Marion Young


The Challenges Of Multiplicity, Jennifer Nedelsky May 1991

The Challenges Of Multiplicity, Jennifer Nedelsky

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Inessential Woman: Problems of Exclusion in Feminist Thought by Elizabeth V. Spelman


Feminizing Unions: Challenging The Gendered Structure Of Wage Labor, Marion Crain Mar 1991

Feminizing Unions: Challenging The Gendered Structure Of Wage Labor, Marion Crain

Michigan Law Review

In this article, I argue that labor unions can be an effective, central tool in a feminist agenda targeting the gendered structure of wage labor. Collective action is the most powerful and expedient route to female empowerment; further, it is the only feasible means of transforming our deeply gendered market and family structure. Others have laid the groundwork by showing how existing individual-model challenges have been unable to accomplish such broad-based reform. I begin where they leave off.


Law's Patriarchy, Lynne Henderson Jan 1991

Law's Patriarchy, Lynne Henderson

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Book Review. Law's Patriarchy, Lynne N. Henderson Jan 1991

Book Review. Law's Patriarchy, Lynne N. Henderson

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Feminist Jurisprudence: Why Law Must Consider Women's Perspectives, Ann Juergens Jan 1991

Feminist Jurisprudence: Why Law Must Consider Women's Perspectives, Ann Juergens

Faculty Scholarship

A growing number of scholars are asking how the law would be different if it took women's points of view and experiences into account. Feminist Jurisprudence argues that we must look at the norms embedded in our legal system and rethink the law. It is about being inclusive of women, and of all people who differ from the norms of the law as it is today. The endeavor will necessarily shake up established relations between family, the workplace and the state. Lawyers, judges, and legislators should get ready for the changes.


The Power Of Language Beyond Words: Law As Invitation, Emily A. Hartigan Jan 1991

The Power Of Language Beyond Words: Law As Invitation, Emily A. Hartigan

Faculty Articles

Law is an invitation to fuller life, more than a mere instrument of force, coercion, and death, which is imprinted within each person and which animates the ideas of our constitutions and statutes. Our laws should seek to reflect and be unified with God’s Law, and the process towards that end requires disclosure and trust, which, in turn, requires clarity of one’s whole person, which is achieved through prayerfulness.

Much of academia and society only recognizes the evil present in our law and society; however, where there is evil or negativity, goodness and that which is positive must ...


“Make The Ring In Your Mind” (Book Review), Emily A. Hartigan Jan 1991

“Make The Ring In Your Mind” (Book Review), Emily A. Hartigan

Faculty Articles

aking All the Difference, by Martha Minow, promised to render the multiple differences of race, gender, disability, and orientation, part of a whole discourse on difference. In this, the book is a success. Yet, the contradiction which Minow’s ideas play with her genre is bothersome. It is not that her way of writing is not valuable. Minow is remarkably lucid. But what she names at the outset—a relational approach, with a sensitivity to boundaries—she does not deliver. That conundrum, and why it seems to be—but is not—the unavoidable dilemma of the gifted female scholar in ...