Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 23 of 23

Full-Text Articles in Law

Book Reviews, Noel T. Dowling (Reviewer), Hugo L. Black, Jr. (Reviewer), George H. Cate, Sr. (Reviewer), Henry N. Williams (Reviewer) Dec 1950

Book Reviews, Noel T. Dowling (Reviewer), Hugo L. Black, Jr. (Reviewer), George H. Cate, Sr. (Reviewer), Henry N. Williams (Reviewer)

Vanderbilt Law Review

On Understanding the Supreme Court

By Paul A. Freund

Boston: Little, Brown & Company, 1949. Pp. 130. $3.00

reviewer: Noel T. Dowling

==================================

Courts on Trial

By Jerome N. Frank

Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1949. Pp. vii, 441. $5.00

reviewer: Hugo L. Black, Jr.

==================================

Hugo L. Black: A Study in the Judicial Process

By Charlotte Williams

Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press, 1950. Pp. vii, 208. $3.50.

reviewer: George H. Cate, Sr.

====================================

Hatch Act Decisions (Political Activity Cases) of the United States Civil Service Commission

By James W. Irwin

Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1949. Pp. 304. $1.50 …


Books Received, Law Review Staff Dec 1950

Books Received, Law Review Staff

Vanderbilt Law Review

Books Received

Availability for Work

By Ralph Altman

Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1950. Pp. 350. $4.50

================================

Comparative Law, Cases and Materials

Rudolf B. Schlesinger

Brooklyn:The Foundation Press, Inc., 1950. Pp. 552. $7.50

=================================

Federal Jurisdiction and Procedure, Cases

By Ray Forrester

St. Paul:West Publishing Company, 1950. Pp. 990. $8.50.

===================================

Financial History of Tennessee Since 1870

By James E. Thorogood

State of Tennessee: Department of Finance and Taxation, 1950. Pp. 245.

====================================

International Law, Cases and Materials

By Edwin D. Dickinson

Brooklyn: The Foundation Press, Inc., 1950. Pp. 740. $8.00

======================================

Primer of Procedure

By Delmar Karlen Madison:

Campus …


Habeas Corpus--Federal Courts--Certiorari To United States Supreme Court As A State Remedy, S. F. B. Dec 1950

Habeas Corpus--Federal Courts--Certiorari To United States Supreme Court As A State Remedy, S. F. B.

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Appeal And Error-Significance Of Denial Of Certiorari As Precedent By United States Supreme Court, Edward W. Rothe S.Ed. Nov 1950

Appeal And Error-Significance Of Denial Of Certiorari As Precedent By United States Supreme Court, Edward W. Rothe S.Ed.

Michigan Law Review

Respondents were found guilty of contempt of court for broadcasting dispatches concerning a person about to be tried on a charge of murder. The convictions were reversed on constitutional grounds by the Court of Appeals of Maryland, relying upon certain decisions of the United States Supreme Court. The state sought a writ of certiorari on the ground that the Maryland court had misconceived the rulings of the Supreme Court. Although the application for certiorari was denied, Justice Frankfurter took occasion to write an opinion stating that the denial of the writ meant only that fewer than four members of the …


De Toledano And Lasky: Seeds Of Treason, Michigan Law Review Jun 1950

De Toledano And Lasky: Seeds Of Treason, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

A Review of SEEDS OF TREASON. By Ralph de Toledano and Victor Lasky.


Administrative Law-Federal Administrative Procedure Act-The Supreme Court Gives The Act Its First Interpretation, Fred W. Freeman S.Ed. Jun 1950

Administrative Law-Federal Administrative Procedure Act-The Supreme Court Gives The Act Its First Interpretation, Fred W. Freeman S.Ed.

Michigan Law Review

The Federal Administrative Procedure Act received its first thorough consideration by the Supreme Court in the recent case of Wong Yang Sung v. McGrath. The Court held that deportation proceedings must conform to section 5, which provides for notice, opportunity for a hearing, separation of prosecution and quasi-judicial functions, and the issuance of declaratory orders by the agency, and to section 11, which prescribes an independent status for presiding officers. The scope of section 5 is limited to administrative adjudications "required by statute to be determined on the record after opportunity for an agency hearing." There is no specific requirement …


Freund: On Understanding The Supreme Court., Michigan Law Review Jun 1950

Freund: On Understanding The Supreme Court., Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

A Review of ON UNDERSTANDING THE SUPREME COURT. By Paul A. Freund.


Constitutional Law-Exports-Immunity From State Taxation, Paul E. Anderson S.Ed. May 1950

Constitutional Law-Exports-Immunity From State Taxation, Paul E. Anderson S.Ed.

Michigan Law Review

Article 1, section 10 of the Constitution provides, "No State shall, without the consent of Congress, lay any imposts or duties on imports or exports . . . . " This clause places a limitation on state taxing power. The basic problem is to determine at what point goods in the process of being manufactured and prepared for foreign shipment become exports. If the goods are found to be exports, they are immune to state taxation. Two recent Supreme Court decisions have dealt with this question in an attempt to lay down a general rule applicable to future situations. Because …


State Taxation Of Interstate Commerce--What Now?, Robert C. Brown May 1950

State Taxation Of Interstate Commerce--What Now?, Robert C. Brown

Michigan Law Review

Perennial indeed have been the problems of state taxation affecting interstate commerce and the problems of intergovernmental taxation as between state and federal governments. The two problems are quite similar except that the intergovernmental problem is mutual while the interstate problem affects only state taxing power. But both are alike in that the restrictions on the taxing power are entirely judicial, and that while some restrictions are desirable they must themselves be limited lest we have not regulation but destruction of taxing power.

The intergovernmental problem is virtually settled with the allowance of non-discriminatory taxation on both sides, except as …


Mr. Justice Murphy, Fred M. Vinson Apr 1950

Mr. Justice Murphy, Fred M. Vinson

Michigan Law Review

I count it a rare privilege to have known Frank Murphy. Gentle, kindly, and amiable of temperament, yet he had a strength of character and tenacity of purpose that enabled him to uphold the right, as God gave him to see the right, no matter what the pressures and constraints. His untimely death deeply touched the hearts of all who knew him, while the poor, the underprivileged, the accused, and minorities of many different shades of belief mourned the passing of one who had been their protagonist.


Mr. Justice Murphy, Hugo L. Black Apr 1950

Mr. Justice Murphy, Hugo L. Black

Michigan Law Review

Frank Murphy's extensive public service is discussed by others in this issue. I write of him as an associate, and as a friend. Our friendship began when we first met in 1936, and grew stronger with the years. No one associated with him could fail to be attracted by his human warmth and his passion for justice.


Mr. Justice Murphy, Ira W. Jayne Apr 1950

Mr. Justice Murphy, Ira W. Jayne

Michigan Law Review

When Justice Frank Murphy took his seat on the bench of the Supreme Court of the United States, I was asked to make a public statement about the appointment.


Mr. Justice Murphy -A Note Of Appreciation, John H. Pickering, Eugene Gressman, T. L. Tolan Jr. Apr 1950

Mr. Justice Murphy -A Note Of Appreciation, John H. Pickering, Eugene Gressman, T. L. Tolan Jr.

Michigan Law Review

Justice Murphy would have observed his tenth anniversary on the Supreme Court on February 5, 1950. Just as some of us who were privileged to serve as his law clerks were beginning to think of plans to honor him on that occasion, the news of his death came to stun us. So instead we pay homage to his memory by relating some of the manifold aspects of the character of this most noble man.


The Rule Of Clear And Present Danger: Scope Of Its Applicability, Chester James Antieau Apr 1950

The Rule Of Clear And Present Danger: Scope Of Its Applicability, Chester James Antieau

Michigan Law Review

The rule of clear and present danger originated in 1919 in an attempt by Mr. Justice Holmes to formulate a principle for the limitation of liberty with a conscious, intelligent weighing of the opposed societal interests. In the Schenck case, the societal and individual interest in freedom of expression clashed with the societal interest in defense of the state. In conflicts of this kind the criterion has had its most frequent application. The societal interest in preservation of the state was adequately protected by application of the test in prosecutions arising under the Espionage Act of 1917, although Mr. Justice …


Wendell: Relations Between The Federal And State Courts, Glenn R. Winters Apr 1950

Wendell: Relations Between The Federal And State Courts, Glenn R. Winters

Michigan Law Review

A Review of RELATIONS BETWEEN THE FEDERAL AND STATE COURTS. By Mitchell Wendell.


Origin And Development Of The Directed Verdict, William Wirt Blume Mar 1950

Origin And Development Of The Directed Verdict, William Wirt Blume

Michigan Law Review

Recent decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States have aroused a new interest in the familiar motion for a directed verdict. In this discussion the writer will undertake a brief examination of the antecedents of the motion, and then will trace its short but significant history.


Book Notes And Books Received, Law Review Staff Feb 1950

Book Notes And Books Received, Law Review Staff

Vanderbilt Law Review

Book Notes

Labor Relations and Federal Law

By Donald H. Wollett

Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1949. Pp. xxv, 148, 30. $3.00

===============================

Tennessee Personal Injury Fact Digest

Compiled by Eugene McSweeney

Nashville: The Fact Digest Co., 1949. Pp. 124. $5.50

==============================

BOOKS RECEIVED

Cases on Federal Taxation

By Roswell Magill

Brooklyn: The Foundation Press, Inc., 1950. Pp. i, 546. $7.00

===============================

Cases on Trusts

By George Gleason Bogert

Brooklyn: The Foundation Press, Inc., 1950. Pp. i, 1041. $7.50

===============================

Differences in Income for Accounting and Federal Income Tax

By Clarence F. Reimer

Chicago: Commerce Clearing House, 1949. Pp. iii,184. …


Freedom From Uncertainty In Income Tax Exemptions, Maurice Finkelstein Feb 1950

Freedom From Uncertainty In Income Tax Exemptions, Maurice Finkelstein

Michigan Law Review

Exemptions from obligations to government are as old as Scripture. It is not strange, therefore, that the public interest in humane government should dictate numerous exemptions from the income tax levy, particularly when one considers that the income tax has long ceased to be simply a revenue producing vehicle. The regulation of inflation or deflation, the control of corporate financial structures, the distribution of wealth, all these and many other concern of government have entered into the formula of our income tax laws. The selection of those who are to be benefited by the tax exemption is, of course, made …


Regulation Of Business-Antitrust Law As Affected By Standard Oil Company Of California V. United States, William R. Worth S. Ed. Feb 1950

Regulation Of Business-Antitrust Law As Affected By Standard Oil Company Of California V. United States, William R. Worth S. Ed.

Michigan Law Review

In Standard Oil Company of California v. United States, the Supreme Court of the United States has given what appears to be a final and definitive answer to this question, although differing from what had formerly been thought to be the "final and definite answer." This comment will be centered on that case and its implications.


Constitutional Law--Freedom Of Speech--Permissible Extent Of Limitation, Clinton R. Ashford S. Ed. Jan 1950

Constitutional Law--Freedom Of Speech--Permissible Extent Of Limitation, Clinton R. Ashford S. Ed.

Michigan Law Review

At the present time this nation is greatly concerned over the state of its political health. Advocates of foreign ideologies are asserting their creeds with ever-increasing vigor. The doctrines they propound are generally conceded to be inconsistent with American ideals, and their activity has induced a feeling of alarm, sometimes attended by hostile reaction. There have been instances where this reaction has taken the form of demands that the proponents of these ideas be silenced. In these circumstances, it becomes important to examine the power of state and federal governments to restrict their activities, particularly with respect to the freedom …


Federal Procedure-Change Of Venue-Applicability Of §1404(A) Of The Judicial Code Of 1948 To Cases Arising Under The Federal Employers' Liability Act And The Sherman Anti-Trust Act, Thomas L. Waterbury S. Ed. Jan 1950

Federal Procedure-Change Of Venue-Applicability Of §1404(A) Of The Judicial Code Of 1948 To Cases Arising Under The Federal Employers' Liability Act And The Sherman Anti-Trust Act, Thomas L. Waterbury S. Ed.

Michigan Law Review

Two recent decisions of the United States Supreme Court have resolved this problem. In the first case, plaintiff employee sued defendant employer for damages under the FELA. Taking advantage of the broad choice of venue given him, plaintiff sued in the Chicago district court which was some 400 miles from Irvine, Kentucky, the place of injury and residence of all the witnesses. Defendant moved for transfer to a Kentucky district court, ''For the convenience of parties and witnesses, in the interest of justice. . . . " The motion was granted and plaintiff sought a writ of mandamus in the …


Habeas Corpus-Inadequacy Of State Remedy, Joseph Gricar Jan 1950

Habeas Corpus-Inadequacy Of State Remedy, Joseph Gricar

Michigan Law Review

Petitioner had pleaded guilty to a criminal indictment and was sentenced to prison by an Illinois circuit court. His petition for a writ of habeas corpus, based upon an alleged denial of due process at trial, was denied without hearing. The Illinois Supreme Court in People v. Loftus, decided in 1949, seems squarely to have held that habeas corpus is a proper post-trial proceeding for hearing charges of denial of due process. Since the Illinois Supreme Court does not review habeas corpus proceedings in the circuit court, the United States Supreme Court granted certiorari. Held, remanded to the …


Reel: The Case Of General Yamashita, Michigan Law Review Jan 1950

Reel: The Case Of General Yamashita, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

A Review of THE CASE OF GENERAL YAMASHITA By A. Frank Reel.