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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Macpherson-Henningsen Puzzle, Victor P. Goldberg Jan 2018

The Macpherson-Henningsen Puzzle, Victor P. Goldberg

Faculty Scholarship

In the landmark case of MacPherson v. Buick, an automobile company was held liable for negligence notwithstanding a lack of privity with the injured driver. Four decades later, in Henningsen v. Bloomfield Motors, the court held unconscionable the standard automobile company warranty which limited its responsibility to repair and replacement, even in a case involving physical injury. This suggests a puzzle: if it were so easy for firms to contract out of liability, did MacPherson accomplish anything?


Manufacturing Defects, David G. Owen Jul 2002

Manufacturing Defects, David G. Owen

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


W(H)Ither Warranty: The B(L)Oom Of Products Liability Theory In Cases Of Deficient Software Design, Peter A. Alces Jan 1999

W(H)Ither Warranty: The B(L)Oom Of Products Liability Theory In Cases Of Deficient Software Design, Peter A. Alces

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Replacing Strict Liability With A Contract-Based Products Liability Regime, Richard C. Ausness Jul 1998

Replacing Strict Liability With A Contract-Based Products Liability Regime, Richard C. Ausness

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

When strict products liability first appeared on the scene some thirty-five years ago, it was heralded as a boon to consumers whose claims to compensation had hitherto been frustrated by the law of sales. Warranty law, it was said, worked fairly well in purely "commercial" transactions, but tort law did a better job in cases where ordinary consumers suffered personal injuries or property damage from defective products. To be sure, defenders of warranty law pointed out that the newly-drafted Uniform Commercial Code (the "Code" or "U.C.C.") was much more consumer friendly than the old Uniform Sales Act. Nevertheless, the proponents …


The Warranty Of Quality In Sale Of Goods Under The Perspective Of The American And French Law, Renaud Baguenault De Puchesse Jan 1989

The Warranty Of Quality In Sale Of Goods Under The Perspective Of The American And French Law, Renaud Baguenault De Puchesse

LLM Theses and Essays

While the United States’ common law system is characterized by diversity due to each state having its own set of rules, in certain areas there are nationwide legislative attempts of unification and standardization. One such attempt is the adoption of the Uniform Commercial Code which governs the sale of goods law in the United States. The French civil law system generally differs greatly from the American system in that it is primarily based upon statutes and codes. However, the American Uniform Commercial Code and the French Civil Code provide tangible, comparable bases to assess similarities and differences between American and …


The Anatomy Of Products Liability In Minnesota: Principles Of Loss Allocation, Michael K. Steenson Jan 1980

The Anatomy Of Products Liability In Minnesota: Principles Of Loss Allocation, Michael K. Steenson

Faculty Scholarship

In this article, Professor Steenson continues the discussion that began in The Anatomy of Products Liability in Minnesota: The Theories of Recovery, appearing in the last Issue of the William Mitchell Law Review, by shifting the analytical focus to the problems involved in allocating awards among the parties in Minnesota products liability cases. Professor Steenson analyzes defenses, contribution and indemnity, and the impact of Minnesota's comparative fault act on products liability law.


Innovation In The Law Of Warranty: The Burden Of Reform, Timothy J. Sullivan Jan 1980

Innovation In The Law Of Warranty: The Burden Of Reform, Timothy J. Sullivan

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


From Caveat Emptor To Strict Liability: A Review Of Products Liability In Florida, Richard C. Ausness Apr 1972

From Caveat Emptor To Strict Liability: A Review Of Products Liability In Florida, Richard C. Ausness

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

Since the doctrine of caveat emptor gave way to a more enlightened response, the courts have struggled to place the law of products liability on a proper doctrinal foundation. Negligence, implied warranty, and strict liability have been used, but as yet no universally accepted theory has emerged. In light of this problem this article will trace the development of seller's liability in Florida. Special emphasis will be placed upon implied warranty; in addition, the relationship between existing Florida case law, strict liability under the Restatement of Torts and the warranty provisions of the Uniform Commercial Code will be examined.