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Warranty

Discipline
Institution
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Articles 1 - 19 of 19

Full-Text Articles in Law

Fit For Its Ordinary Purpose: Implied Warranties And Common Law Duties For Consumer Finance Contracts, Susan Block-Lieb, Edward J. Janger Jan 2022

Fit For Its Ordinary Purpose: Implied Warranties And Common Law Duties For Consumer Finance Contracts, Susan Block-Lieb, Edward J. Janger

Faculty Scholarship

The history of consumer goods and consumer credit markets pre-sents an anomaly: market transactions for consumer goods and credit transactions evolved in tandem from face to face and bespoke to standardized and widely distributed; the law governing these “product” markets has not. With consumer goods, the Uniform Commercial Code codifies implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose, and the common law of tort provides strict liability for defective products. With consumer fi-nance contracts, borrowers enjoy scant common law protection. And yet both consumer goods and consumer contracts may be danger-ously defective “products.”

This Article reconsiders the traditional, …


Comparative Warranty Law: Case Of Planned Obsolescence, Stefan Wrbka, Larry A. Dimatteo Jan 2019

Comparative Warranty Law: Case Of Planned Obsolescence, Stefan Wrbka, Larry A. Dimatteo

UF Law Faculty Publications

The cause of our present stagnation is that the supply line or arteries furnishing the needs of the country are clogged with obsolete, outworn and outmoded machinery, buildings and commodities of all kinds. These are obstructing the avenues of commerce and industry and are preventing new products from coming through. There is little demand for new goods when people make their old and worn-out things do, by keeping them longer than they should.


The Macpherson-Henningsen Puzzle, Victor P. Goldberg Jan 2018

The Macpherson-Henningsen Puzzle, Victor P. Goldberg

Faculty Scholarship

In the landmark case of MacPherson v. Buick, an automobile company was held liable for negligence notwithstanding a lack of privity with the injured driver. Four decades later, in Henningsen v. Bloomfield Motors, the court held unconscionable the standard automobile company warranty which limited its responsibility to repair and replacement, even in a case involving physical injury. This suggests a puzzle: if it were so easy for firms to contract out of liability, did MacPherson accomplish anything?


Wearables And Warranties, Rachel Landy, Jennifer M. Halbleib Oct 2017

Wearables And Warranties, Rachel Landy, Jennifer M. Halbleib

Online Publications

The last few years have seen an explosion of wearable digital health products. Where a doctor’s visit used to be required for a basic check-up, now a patient’s health status is increasingly at his or her fingertips. We have the ability to track fitness levels, monitor lung and heart capacity, check skin temperature, and observe blood pressure with a simple wearable device.


Strict Products Liability At 50: Four Histories, Kyle Graham Jan 2014

Strict Products Liability At 50: Four Histories, Kyle Graham

Faculty Publications

This article offers four different perspectives on the strict products-liability "revolution" that climaxed a half-century ago. One of these narratives relates the prevailing assessment of how this innovation coalesced and spread across the states. The three alternative histories introduced by this article both challenge and complement the standard account by viewing the shift toward strict products liability through "populist," "practical," and "contingent" lenses, respectively. The first of these narratives considers the contributions that plaintiffs and their counsel made toward this change in the law. The second focuses upon how certain types of once-common products cases forged a practical argument for …


Unrevised Section 2-207--Different Terms Revisited, Sidney Kwestel May 2009

Unrevised Section 2-207--Different Terms Revisited, Sidney Kwestel

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


The Best Puffery Article Ever, David A. Hoffman Jan 2006

The Best Puffery Article Ever, David A. Hoffman

All Faculty Scholarship

This Article provides the first extensive legal treatment of an important defense in the law of fraud and contracts: puffery. Legal authorities commonly say they make decisions about whether defendants should be able to utter exaggerated, optimistic, lies based on assumptions about buyer behavior, concluding that consumers do not rely on such speech. However, as the Article shows, such analyses are proxies for a deeper analytical question: does the speech encourage or discourage a type of consumption activity that the court deems welfare maximizing? The Article presents a novel constitutional analysis of puffery doctrine that focuses on the meaning of …


Manufacturing Defects, David G. Owen Jul 2002

Manufacturing Defects, David G. Owen

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


W(H)Ither Warranty: The B(L)Oom Of Products Liability Theory In Cases Of Deficient Software Design, Peter A. Alces Jan 1999

W(H)Ither Warranty: The B(L)Oom Of Products Liability Theory In Cases Of Deficient Software Design, Peter A. Alces

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Replacing Strict Liability With A Contract-Based Products Liability Regime, Richard C. Ausness Jul 1998

Replacing Strict Liability With A Contract-Based Products Liability Regime, Richard C. Ausness

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

When strict products liability first appeared on the scene some thirty-five years ago, it was heralded as a boon to consumers whose claims to compensation had hitherto been frustrated by the law of sales. Warranty law, it was said, worked fairly well in purely "commercial" transactions, but tort law did a better job in cases where ordinary consumers suffered personal injuries or property damage from defective products. To be sure, defenders of warranty law pointed out that the newly-drafted Uniform Commercial Code (the "Code" or "U.C.C.") was much more consumer friendly than the old Uniform Sales Act. Nevertheless, the proponents …


A New Image Of The Slave Auction: An Empirical Look At The Role Of Law In Slave Sales And A Conceptual Reevaluation Of Slave Property, Thomas D. Russell Jan 1996

A New Image Of The Slave Auction: An Empirical Look At The Role Of Law In Slave Sales And A Conceptual Reevaluation Of Slave Property, Thomas D. Russell

Sturm College of Law: Faculty Scholarship

This legal history article presents a new understanding of the nature of slave property. Slave property was divided and fragmented into many different interests including those with application to real property such life estates, remainders, shifting and spring interests, and leasehold interests. With regard to these interests, the article overlays the first-year, law-school property course onto slaves as property. Property interests in slaves were also divided by credit mechanisms including mortgages and secured credit transactions. Warranties are another example of divided property interests in slaves.

The fragmented, Hohfeldian nature of slave property distributed the stake that southerners had in the …


The Warranty Of Quality In Sale Of Goods Under The Perspective Of The American And French Law, Renaud Baguenault De Puchesse Jan 1989

The Warranty Of Quality In Sale Of Goods Under The Perspective Of The American And French Law, Renaud Baguenault De Puchesse

LLM Theses and Essays

While the United States’ common law system is characterized by diversity due to each state having its own set of rules, in certain areas there are nationwide legislative attempts of unification and standardization. One such attempt is the adoption of the Uniform Commercial Code which governs the sale of goods law in the United States. The French civil law system generally differs greatly from the American system in that it is primarily based upon statutes and codes. However, the American Uniform Commercial Code and the French Civil Code provide tangible, comparable bases to assess similarities and differences between American and …


Efficient Remedies For Breach Of Warranty, Kenneth Chapman, Michael J. Meurer Jan 1989

Efficient Remedies For Breach Of Warranty, Kenneth Chapman, Michael J. Meurer

Faculty Scholarship

This article attempts to suggest valuable refinements and extensions of the economic theory of warranty by explicitly considering the choice of remedies for breach of warranty in conjunction with the choice of warranty protection itself. In particular, it offers explanations for the prevalence of replacement terms rather than refund terms in warranties. Economists studying the general issue of breach of contract have noted that the choice of remedy has important implications for risk sharing, renegotiation, transaction-specific investment, and the incentive to breach.5 This article derives much of its insight from the recognition that work on the economics of contract breach …


Article Two Warranties In Commercial Transactions: An Update, Kathryn L. Moore, Debra L. Goetz, Douglas E. Perry, David S. Rabb Sep 1987

Article Two Warranties In Commercial Transactions: An Update, Kathryn L. Moore, Debra L. Goetz, Douglas E. Perry, David S. Rabb

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

In 1978 the Cornell Law Review published a Special Project devoted to Article Two commercial warranties. Nine years have since elapsed, and we have decided to update and reassess this important area of the law. We have discovered that although judicial treatment of many aspects of Article Two warranty law has remained stable, in some instances the courts' treatment has progressed and in other instances it has become unclear. This Special Project is our attempt to assemble these changes, interpret the progress, and suggest new lines of analysis to clarify areas of conflict.


The Merchant Of Section 2-314: Who Needs Him?, Ingrid Michelsen Hillinger Mar 1983

The Merchant Of Section 2-314: Who Needs Him?, Ingrid Michelsen Hillinger

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Contractual Disclaimer And Limitation Of Liability Under The Law Of New York, James Brook Jan 1983

Contractual Disclaimer And Limitation Of Liability Under The Law Of New York, James Brook

Articles & Chapters

No abstract provided.


The Anatomy Of Products Liability In Minnesota: Principles Of Loss Allocation, Michael K. Steenson Jan 1980

The Anatomy Of Products Liability In Minnesota: Principles Of Loss Allocation, Michael K. Steenson

Faculty Scholarship

In this article, Professor Steenson continues the discussion that began in The Anatomy of Products Liability in Minnesota: The Theories of Recovery, appearing in the last Issue of the William Mitchell Law Review, by shifting the analytical focus to the problems involved in allocating awards among the parties in Minnesota products liability cases. Professor Steenson analyzes defenses, contribution and indemnity, and the impact of Minnesota's comparative fault act on products liability law.


Innovation In The Law Of Warranty: The Burden Of Reform, Timothy J. Sullivan Jan 1980

Innovation In The Law Of Warranty: The Burden Of Reform, Timothy J. Sullivan

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


From Caveat Emptor To Strict Liability: A Review Of Products Liability In Florida, Richard C. Ausness Apr 1972

From Caveat Emptor To Strict Liability: A Review Of Products Liability In Florida, Richard C. Ausness

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

Since the doctrine of caveat emptor gave way to a more enlightened response, the courts have struggled to place the law of products liability on a proper doctrinal foundation. Negligence, implied warranty, and strict liability have been used, but as yet no universally accepted theory has emerged. In light of this problem this article will trace the development of seller's liability in Florida. Special emphasis will be placed upon implied warranty; in addition, the relationship between existing Florida case law, strict liability under the Restatement of Torts and the warranty provisions of the Uniform Commercial Code will be examined.