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Introductory Note To Prosecutor V. Ratko Mladić (U.N. Int’L Residual Mechanism Crim. Tribunals App. Chamber), Steven Arrigg Koh Apr 2022

Introductory Note To Prosecutor V. Ratko Mladić (U.N. Int’L Residual Mechanism Crim. Tribunals App. Chamber), Steven Arrigg Koh

Faculty Scholarship

On June 8, 2021, the UN International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals (Mechanism) Appeals Chamber delivered its appeals judgment in Prosecutor v. Ratko Mladić. The judgment affirmed the 2017 trial judgment of Trial Chamber I of the UN International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), which convicted Mladić, the Bosnian Serb commander, of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes during the war in Bosnia between 1992 and 1995, as well as affirming his sentence of life imprisonment. This constituted Mladić’s final appeal, opening the door for his assignment to a prison somewhere in Europe.


Toward An Interest Group Theory Of Foreign Anti-Corruption Laws, Sean J. Griffith, Thomas H. Lee Jan 2019

Toward An Interest Group Theory Of Foreign Anti-Corruption Laws, Sean J. Griffith, Thomas H. Lee

Faculty Scholarship

Foreign anti-corruption laws—laws that prohibit businesses from paying bribes abroad— present a puzzle. Why would the government of one country care to prevent corruption in other countries, especially when such laws harm domestic businesses? Unregulated foreign competitors can continue to pay bribes and win contracts while domestic companies suffer. Yet foreign anti-corruption laws now span the globe. We offer an interest-group account of the spread of foreign anti-corruption laws. Our account is bottom-up and focused on private interest groups, rather than top-down and focused on state institutions. We look at domestic political interests in the United States and abroad to …


The Human Rights Of Sea Pirates: Will The European Court Of Human Rights Decisions Get More Killed?, Barry Hart Dubner, Brian Othero Jan 2016

The Human Rights Of Sea Pirates: Will The European Court Of Human Rights Decisions Get More Killed?, Barry Hart Dubner, Brian Othero

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


On The Effectiveness Of Private Security Guards On Board Merchant Ships Off The Coast Of Somalia -- Where Is The Piracy? What Are The Legal Ramifications?, Barry H. Dubner, Claudia Pastorius Jul 2014

On The Effectiveness Of Private Security Guards On Board Merchant Ships Off The Coast Of Somalia -- Where Is The Piracy? What Are The Legal Ramifications?, Barry H. Dubner, Claudia Pastorius

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Anticipatory Self-Defense And The Israeli-Iranian Crisis: Some Remarks, Charles J. Dunlap Jr. Jan 2013

Anticipatory Self-Defense And The Israeli-Iranian Crisis: Some Remarks, Charles J. Dunlap Jr.

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Criminalized State: The International Criminal Court, The Responsibility To Protect, And Darfur, Republic Of Sudan, Matthew H. Charity Jan 2011

Criminalized State: The International Criminal Court, The Responsibility To Protect, And Darfur, Republic Of Sudan, Matthew H. Charity

Faculty Scholarship

The international community continues to struggle with the question of what to do when a nation fails to protect its own people from systemic neglect, mistreatment, or even genocide. For many years, this debate pitted proponents of humanitarian intervention by a third-party against those who believe that all others must defer to the sovereign right of the state to control its own affairs and the affairs of its people. In the midst of this debate, the international community has adopted a middle road: insisting that states must acknowledge their responsibility to protect their populations and if the state manifestly fails …


Continental Shelf Delimitation Beyond 200 Nautical Miles: Approaches Taken By Coastal States Before The Commission On The Limits Of The Continental Shelf, Coalter G. Lathrop Jan 2011

Continental Shelf Delimitation Beyond 200 Nautical Miles: Approaches Taken By Coastal States Before The Commission On The Limits Of The Continental Shelf, Coalter G. Lathrop

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Cyber-Attacks And The Use Of Force: Back To The Future Of Article 2(4), Matthew C. Waxman Jan 2011

Cyber-Attacks And The Use Of Force: Back To The Future Of Article 2(4), Matthew C. Waxman

Faculty Scholarship

This Article makes two overarching arguments. First, strategy is a major driver of legal evolution. Most scholarship and commentary on cyber-attacks capture only one dimension of this point, focusing on how international law might be interpreted or amended to take account of new technologies and threats. The focus here, however, is on the dynamic interplay of law and strategy – strategy generates reappraisal and revision of law, while law itself shapes strategy – and the moves and countermoves among actors with varying interests, capabilities, and vulnerabilities. The purpose is not to come down in favor of one legal interpretation or …


Child, Family, State, And Gender Equality In Religious Stances And Human Rights Instruments: A Preliminary Comparison, Linda C. Mcclain Sep 2010

Child, Family, State, And Gender Equality In Religious Stances And Human Rights Instruments: A Preliminary Comparison, Linda C. Mcclain

Faculty Scholarship

The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) recently began its third decade. Why has the United States still not ratified the CRC, celebrated as the most widely ratified international human rights treaty in history? Once again, this question is on the table: Congressional resolutions that President Obama should not transmit the CRC to the Senate for advice and consent rapidly followed intimations that the Obama Administration had some qualms about the U.S. keeping company only with Somalia in not ratifying it. Some scholars contend that enlisting the unique resources of religions would help to ground a culture …


Introduction: The New Collective Security, Peter G. Danchin, Horst Fischer Jan 2010

Introduction: The New Collective Security, Peter G. Danchin, Horst Fischer

Faculty Scholarship

Whether viewed as a socio-legal project gently civilizing states away from an older politics of diplomacy, deterrence, self-help and legitimate warfare, or as an institutional project establishing a collective security system premised on the rule of law, the primary purpose of the United Nations today remains the maintenance of international peace and security and the abolition of the “scourge of war.” In March 2003, the U.S. and its allies invaded Iraq, a member State of the United Nations, in order to disarm it and change the regime of Saddam Hussein. The war shook the United Nations and leading capitals around …


Things Fall Apart: The Concept Of Collective Security In International Law, Peter G. Danchin Jan 2010

Things Fall Apart: The Concept Of Collective Security In International Law, Peter G. Danchin

Faculty Scholarship

This chapter provides an introduction to the analytical and historical aspects of the concept of collective security in international law. Taking the examples of Italy’s invasion of Ethiopia in 1935 during the League of Nations and the complaint brought by Hyderabad against India at the very inception of the United Nations in 1948, the chapter traces the complex dialectics of normativity and concreteness in debates concerning collective security. Mirroring the normative and institutional dilemmas underlying the two cases of Ethiopia and Hyderabad, it is observed that the questions of “external threats” (the threat or use of force between States) and …


Assessing The High-Level Panel Report: Rethinking The Causes And Consequences Of Threats To Collective Security, Maxwell O. Chibundu Jan 2010

Assessing The High-Level Panel Report: Rethinking The Causes And Consequences Of Threats To Collective Security, Maxwell O. Chibundu

Faculty Scholarship

This is a contribution to a volume of essays anchored in the evaluations of proposed reforms of the United Nations system extant in the middle half of the last decade. The essay’s focus is primarily on the role of the Security Council as the provider of collective security within the system. It contends that the term “collective security” has become far too amorphous and too all-embracing to be useful, and that it runs the risk of distorting the proper allocation of power within the international system. It argues for a more circumscribed view of collective security, and for a less …


Cultural And Economic Self-Determination For Tribal Peoples In The United States Supported By The Un Declaration On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples, Angelique Eaglewoman Jan 2010

Cultural And Economic Self-Determination For Tribal Peoples In The United States Supported By The Un Declaration On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples, Angelique Eaglewoman

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Protecting A Hidden Treasure: The U.N. International Law Commission And The International Law Of Transboundary Ground Water Resources, Gabriel E. Eckstein Jan 2005

Protecting A Hidden Treasure: The U.N. International Law Commission And The International Law Of Transboundary Ground Water Resources, Gabriel E. Eckstein

Faculty Scholarship

Ground water is the most extracted natural resource in the world. It provides more than half of humanity's freshwater for everyday uses such as drinking, cooking, and hygiene, as well as twenty percent of irrigated agriculture. Given the world's considerable reliance on this precious resource, it is reasonable to assume that international attention to, and especially legal consideration of, ground water would be substantial. Nothing is further from the truth. Despite the growing dependence, legal and regulatory attention to ground water resources have long been secondary to surface water, especially among legislatures and policymakers and above all in the international …


Agreeing To Disagree: Security Council Resolution 1441 And Intentional Ambiguity, Michael Byers Jun 2004

Agreeing To Disagree: Security Council Resolution 1441 And Intentional Ambiguity, Michael Byers

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Oscar Schachter (1915-2003), Lori Fisler Damrosch Jan 2004

Oscar Schachter (1915-2003), Lori Fisler Damrosch

Faculty Scholarship

Among ''jurisconsults of recognized competence in international law" and "most highly qualified publicists of the various nations, " no one in the second half of the twentieth century did more than Oscar Schachter to influence both the theory and the practice of international law, especially the law of the United Nations Charter. When the centennial of the American Society of International Law arrives in two years, we will have occasion to reflect on his contributions to this Journal and many other endeavors of the Society, across a long and vigorous life.


Lessons From The World Conference Against Racism, Peggy Maisel Jan 2002

Lessons From The World Conference Against Racism, Peggy Maisel

Faculty Scholarship

It is difficult to get people to remember, let alone focus on the accomplishments and ongoing challenges that emerged during the United Nations sponsored World Conference Against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia, and Related Intolerance (the WCAR) held just over a year ago in Durban, South Africa. The reason is simple: that conference ended on September 8, 2001, and what we remember about that period is now permanently obscured by what happened just three short days later. But the events of September 11 make it more imperative than ever that we address the evils of racism, racial discrimination, and xenophobia. It …


The Legality Of The Nato Bombing Operation In The Federal Republic Of Yugoslavia, Aaron Schwabach Oct 1999

The Legality Of The Nato Bombing Operation In The Federal Republic Of Yugoslavia, Aaron Schwabach

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Defining And Punishing Abroad: Constitutional Limits On The Extraterritorial Reach Of The Offenses Clause Note, Zephyr Teachout Jan 1998

Defining And Punishing Abroad: Constitutional Limits On The Extraterritorial Reach Of The Offenses Clause Note, Zephyr Teachout

Faculty Scholarship

The Offenses Clause of the United States Constitution gives Congress the authority to "define and punish... Offences against the Law of Nations." This Note considers whether Congress must conform to the jurisdictional rules of customary international law when legislating pursuant to the Offenses Clause.


Dispute Over The United States’ Denial Of A Visa To Yasir Arafat, Sadiq Reza Jan 1989

Dispute Over The United States’ Denial Of A Visa To Yasir Arafat, Sadiq Reza

Faculty Scholarship

On November 26, 1988, the United States denied a visa to Yasir Arafat, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), when he sought to enter the United States to attend the forty-third session of the United Nations (UN) in New York. The denial rekindled a forty-year-old dispute between the United States and the UN over the extent to which the United States may, under the terms of the Agreement Between the United Nations and the United States of America Regarding the Headquarters of the United Nations (Headquarters Agreement), restrict entry to persons seeking to enter the …