Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Series

Terrorist

Discipline
Institution
Publication Year
Publication

Articles 1 - 30 of 32

Full-Text Articles in Law

Newsroom: Interrogation Expert Warns Against Use Of Torture 2-2-2018, Roger Williams University School Of Law Feb 2018

Newsroom: Interrogation Expert Warns Against Use Of Torture 2-2-2018, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Newsroom: Representing Private Manning 09-18-2017, Edward Fitzpatrick, Roger Williams University School Of Law Sep 2017

Newsroom: Representing Private Manning 09-18-2017, Edward Fitzpatrick, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Newsroom: Golocalprov: Vargas '20 On Trump And The Future Of The Ri Gop 08-17-2017, Golocalprov Political Team, Roger Williams University School Of Law Aug 2017

Newsroom: Golocalprov: Vargas '20 On Trump And The Future Of The Ri Gop 08-17-2017, Golocalprov Political Team, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


With Chelsea Manning's Release, Lead Trial Attorney Coombs Recalls Case: Rwu Law Professor David E. Coombs Revisits Issues In The Case, Looks Forward To Teaching Again Next Year 05-17-2017, Edward Fitzpatrick May 2017

With Chelsea Manning's Release, Lead Trial Attorney Coombs Recalls Case: Rwu Law Professor David E. Coombs Revisits Issues In The Case, Looks Forward To Teaching Again Next Year 05-17-2017, Edward Fitzpatrick

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Trending @ Rwu Law: Dean Yelnosky's Post: What The Tragedy In Orlando Means For Rwu Law 6/17/2016, Michael Yelnosky Jun 2016

Trending @ Rwu Law: Dean Yelnosky's Post: What The Tragedy In Orlando Means For Rwu Law 6/17/2016, Michael Yelnosky

Law School Blogs

No abstract provided.


Was Governor Lachlan Macquarie A Terrorist?, Ian C. Willis Jan 2016

Was Governor Lachlan Macquarie A Terrorist?, Ian C. Willis

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers (Archive)

In The Guardian Australia online this week there has appeared an article that asks the question: 'Was Governor Lachlan Macquarie a terrorist?' Paul Daley writes: 'The colonial frontier was a violent location and many people suffered and died. Colonialism wreaked havoc on many cultures around the globe'. Was Governor Macquarie any better or worse than any other colonial administrator? Over next 150 years it is estimated that over 20,000 Aboriginal Australians were massacred in frontier wars. Is it fair to pick on Macquarie?


Justice At War: Military Tribunals And Article Iii, Peter Margulies Nov 2015

Justice At War: Military Tribunals And Article Iii, Peter Margulies

Law Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Mirandizing Terrorism Suspects? The Public Safety Exception, The Rescue Doctrine, And Implicit Analogies To Self-Defense, Defense Of Others, And Battered Woman Syndrome, Bruce Ching Jan 2015

Mirandizing Terrorism Suspects? The Public Safety Exception, The Rescue Doctrine, And Implicit Analogies To Self-Defense, Defense Of Others, And Battered Woman Syndrome, Bruce Ching

Journal Articles

This article argues that in creating the public safety exception to the Miranda requirements, the Supreme Court implicitly analogized to the criminal law doctrines of self-defense and defense of others. Thus, examining the justifications of self-defense and defense of others can be useful in determining the contours of the public safety exception and the related "rescue doctrine" exception. In particular, the battered woman syndrome -- which is recognized in a majority of the states and has been successfully invoked by defendants in some self-defense cases -- could provide a conceptual analogue for arguments about whether law enforcement officers were faced with an ...


Post-9/11 Illegal Immigrant Detention And Deportation: Terrorism And The Criminalization Of Immigration, Stefany N. Laun Oct 2014

Post-9/11 Illegal Immigrant Detention And Deportation: Terrorism And The Criminalization Of Immigration, Stefany N. Laun

Student Publications

This paper analyzes the changes in immigration policy since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 in terms of how immigrants are viewed in the United States. The goal is to address the recent criminalization of immigration in that the perceptions of terrorists and immigrants have become relatively synonymous since 2001. Although deportations have decreased, immigrant detention has increased significantly. Detention centers pose threats to the basic human rights of the immigrants residing in them, as well as perpetuate the culture of fear enveloping recent immigrants, whether they are legally or illegally in the country, and native United States citizens ...


Unsatisfying Wars: Degrees Of Risk And The Jus Ex Bello, Gabriella Blum, David Luban Jan 2014

Unsatisfying Wars: Degrees Of Risk And The Jus Ex Bello, Gabriella Blum, David Luban

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Self-defensive war uses violence to transfer risks from one’s own people to others. We argue that central questions in just war theory may fruitfully be analyzed as issues about the morality of risk transfer. That includes the jus ex bello question of when states are required to accept a ceasefire in an otherwise-just war. In particular, a “war on terror” that ups the risks to outsiders cannot continue until the risk of terrorism has been reduced to zero or near zero. Some degree of security risk is inevitable when coexisting with others in the international community, just as citizens ...


Legal Affairs: Dreyfus, Guantánamo, And The Foundation Of The Rule Of Law, David Cole May 2013

Legal Affairs: Dreyfus, Guantánamo, And The Foundation Of The Rule Of Law, David Cole

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The Dreyfus affair reminds us that the rule of law and basic human rights are not self-executing. In a democracy, individual rights and the rule of law are designed to check popular power and protect the individual from the majority. Yet paradoxically, they cannot do so without substantial popular support. Alfred Dreyfus received two trialsor at least the trappings thereofand was twice wrongly convicted. The rule of law was initially unable to stand between an innocent man and the powerful men who sought to frame him. But the issue of Dreyfus's guilt or innocence was not concluded ...


Where Could The 9/11 Terrorist Trials Go Next?, Gregory L. Rose, Anthony Bergin Jan 2012

Where Could The 9/11 Terrorist Trials Go Next?, Gregory L. Rose, Anthony Bergin

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers (Archive)

The criminal trials of the 9/11 terrorists may finally be coming to the punch line. Last Friday, the criminal trial of the architect of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Khalid Sheik Mohammed, together with four others commenced in the Military Commission at Guantánamo Bay.

Yet this might be another variation on previous suspended prosecutions. In February 2008, criminal charges were first pressed against Khalid Sheik and his alleged co-conspirators in the Military Commission under the administration of president George W Bush. The trial began in June 2008. Five months later the accused indicated that they would plead guilty.

In ...


Terrorism And The Law: Cases And Materials, Gregory E. Maggs Jan 2010

Terrorism And The Law: Cases And Materials, Gregory E. Maggs

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

Terrorism and the Law: Cases and Materials (2d ed. 2010) is a textbook written by Professor Gregory E. Maggs (of the George Washington University Law School) and published by West (ISBN-13: 9780314908582).

The textbook considers legal aspects of a broad range of methods that governments have for fighting terrorism, including criminal penalties, economic sanctions, immigration restrictions, military force, and civil liability. It addresses not just the steps taken in reaction to the 9/11 attacks, but also many other counterterrorism measures by the United States and other nations in recent years. To offer a global and comparative perspective, the materials ...


Terrorism And The Law: Cases And Materials, Gregory E. Maggs Jan 2010

Terrorism And The Law: Cases And Materials, Gregory E. Maggs

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

Terrorism and the Law: Cases and Materials (2d ed. 2010) is a textbook written by Professor Gregory E. Maggs (of the George Washington University Law School) and published by West (ISBN-13: 9780314908582).

The textbook considers legal aspects of a broad range of methods that governments have for fighting terrorism, including criminal penalties, economic sanctions, immigration restrictions, military force, and civil liability. It addresses not just the steps taken in reaction to the 9/11 attacks, but also many other counterterrorism measures by the United States and other nations in recent years. To offer a global and comparative perspective, the materials ...


Exceptional Engagement: Protocol I And A World United Against Terrorism, Michael A. Newton Jan 2009

Exceptional Engagement: Protocol I And A World United Against Terrorism, Michael A. Newton

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

This article challenges the prevailing view that U.S. "exceptionalism" provides the strongest narrative for the U.S. rejection of Additional Protocol I to the 1949 Geneva Conventions. The United States chose not to adopt the Protocol in the face of intensive international criticism because of its policy conclusions that the text contained overly expansive provisions resulting from politicized pressure to accord protection to terrorists who elected to conduct hostile military operations outside the established legal framework. The United States concluded that the commingling of the regime criminalizing terrorist acts with the jus in bello rules of humanitarian law would ...


Some Observations On The Future Of U.S. Military Commissions, Michael A. Newton Jan 2009

Some Observations On The Future Of U.S. Military Commissions, Michael A. Newton

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

The Obama Administration confronts many of the same practical and legal complexities that interagency experts debated in the fall of 2001. Military commissions remain a valid, if unwieldy, tool to be used at the discretion of a Commander-in-Chief. Refinement of the commission procedures has consumed thousands of legal hours within the Department of Defense, as well as a significant share of the Supreme Court docket. In practice, the military commissions have not been the charade of justice created by an overpowerful and unaccountable chief executive that critics predicted. In light of the permissive structure of U.S. statutes and the ...


In The Sweat Box: A Historical Perspective On The Detention Of Material Witnesses, Carolyn B. Ramsey Jan 2009

In The Sweat Box: A Historical Perspective On The Detention Of Material Witnesses, Carolyn B. Ramsey

Articles

After the September 11 terrorist attacks, the Justice Department detained scores of allegedly suspicious persons under a federal material witness statute--a tactic that provoked a great deal of controversy. Most critics assume that the abuse of material witness laws is a new development. Yet, rather than being transformed by the War on Terror, the detention of material witnesses is a coercive strategy that police officers across the nation have used since the nineteenth century to build cases against suspects. Fears of extraordinary violence or social breakdown played at most an indirect role in its advent and growth. Rather, it has ...


Responses To The Ten Questions [On National Security Posed By The Journal Of National Security Forum Board Of Editors], Gregory E. Maggs Jan 2009

Responses To The Ten Questions [On National Security Posed By The Journal Of National Security Forum Board Of Editors], Gregory E. Maggs

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

In 2009, the Journal of the National Security Forum Board of Editors posed ten questions on national security to a group of national-security law experts. Contributors were free to answer as many of the ten questions as they wished. All responses were published in a special issue of the William Mitchell Law Review. I answered the following three questions: 3. What are the lessons from detaining non-U.S. citizens, labeled enemy combatants, at Gitmo? 4. What is left for the Supreme Court to decide after the Boumediene decision? 10. What is the most important issue for American national security?

The ...


Human Dignity, Humiliation, And Torture, David Luban Jan 2009

Human Dignity, Humiliation, And Torture, David Luban

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Modern human rights instruments ground human rights in the concept of human dignity, without providing an underlying theory of human dignity. This paper examines the central importance of human dignity, understood as not humiliating people, in traditional Jewish ethics. It employs this conception of human dignity to examine and criticize U.S. use of humiliation tactics and torture in the interrogation of terrorism suspects.


A Hartman Hotz Symposium: Intelligence, Law, And Democracy, Lord Robin Butler, William Howard Taft Iv, Alberto Mora, Stephen M. Sheppard Jan 2008

A Hartman Hotz Symposium: Intelligence, Law, And Democracy, Lord Robin Butler, William Howard Taft Iv, Alberto Mora, Stephen M. Sheppard

Faculty Articles

Following the attacks of 2001, the United States has been confronted with great challenges in its efforts to protect its soil, its people, and its interests. Perhaps none have been as challenging as the extent to which the President and other officials may act without oversight in their acquisition of intelligence and use of that information. Many novel practices have had repercussions across the globe as well as in Arkansas: the long-term detention of both foreign nationals and American citizens without judicial review; the use of brutal enhanced interrogation procedures on those detained; the trial of prisoners by military commissions ...


Assessing The Terrorist Threat To Singapore's Land Transportation Infrastructure, Adam Dolnik Jan 2007

Assessing The Terrorist Threat To Singapore's Land Transportation Infrastructure, Adam Dolnik

Faculty of Law - Papers (Archive)

The highly lethal attacks against land transportation targets in Madrid and London have sparked considerable amount of debate in Singapore about the terrorist threat to the local land transportation infrastructure. How real is this threat and what can be done to counter it? This is the central question addressed in this paper. While transportation targets in general have always been a terrorist favorite, in recent years there has been an increased emphasis on attacking soft transportation targets such as mass transit. There are several distinct reasons for this development, including the increasing difficulty of successfully striking other targets, the ease ...


Congress Has The Power To Enforce The Bill Of Rights Against The Federal Government: Therefore Fisa Is Constitutional And The President's Terrorist Surveillance Program Is Illegal, Wilson R. Huhn Jan 2007

Congress Has The Power To Enforce The Bill Of Rights Against The Federal Government: Therefore Fisa Is Constitutional And The President's Terrorist Surveillance Program Is Illegal, Wilson R. Huhn

Akron Law Publications

The principal point of this Article is that Congress has plenary authority to enforce the Bill of Rights against the federal government. Although this precept is a fundamental one, neither the Supreme Court nor legal scholars have articulated this point in clear, simple, and direct terms. The Supreme Court does not have a monopoly on the Bill of Rights. Congress, too, has constitutional authority to interpret our rights and to enforce or enlarge them as against the actions of the federal government.

Congress exercised its power to protect the constitutional rights of American citizens when it enacted the Foreign Intelligence ...


Israel's Example, Sadiq Reza Jan 2004

Israel's Example, Sadiq Reza

Other Publications

No abstract provided.


A Double Due Process Denial: The Crime Of Providing Material Support Or Resources To Designated Foreign Terrorist Organizations, Randolph N. Jonakait Jan 2004

A Double Due Process Denial: The Crime Of Providing Material Support Or Resources To Designated Foreign Terrorist Organizations, Randolph N. Jonakait

Articles & Chapters

No abstract provided.


Their Liberties, Our Security: Democracy And Double Standards, David Cole Jan 2003

Their Liberties, Our Security: Democracy And Double Standards, David Cole

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Some maintain that a "double standard" for citizens and noncitizens is perfectly justified. The attacks of September 11 were perpetrated by nineteen Arab noncitizens, and we have reason to believe that other Arab noncitizens are associated with the attackers and will seek to attack again. Citizens, it is said, are presumptively loyal; noncitizens are not. Thus, it is not irrational to focus on Arab noncitizens. Moreover, on a normative level, if citizens and noncitizens were treated identically, citizenship itself might be rendered meaningless. The very essence of war involves the drawing of lines in the sand between citizens of our ...


Losses Of Equal Value, Michael I. Meyerson Mar 2002

Losses Of Equal Value, Michael I. Meyerson

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Youngstown Revisited, A. Christopher Bryant, Carl Tobias Jan 2002

Youngstown Revisited, A. Christopher Bryant, Carl Tobias

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

In 1952, President Harry S. Truman promulgated an Executive Order that authorized federal government seizure of the nation's steel mills to support United States participation in the Korean conflict, but the Supreme Court held that Truman lacked any power to seize the property in Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co. v. Sawyer. In 2001, President George W. Bush promulgated an Executive Order that authorized trial by military commissions of non-U.S. citizens whom the American government suspects of terrorism in domestic cases and concomitantly denied these persons access to the federal courts. This article undertakes an analysis of the Bush Executive ...


The War On Terrorism And The End Of Human Rights, David Luban Jan 2002

The War On Terrorism And The End Of Human Rights, David Luban

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

In the immediate aftermath of September 11, President Bush stated that the perpetrators of the deed would be brought to justice. Soon afterwards, the President announced that the United States would engage in a war on terrorism. The first of these statements adopts the familiar language of criminal law and criminal justice. It treats the September 11 attacks as horrific crimes—mass murders—and the government’s mission as apprehending and punishing the surviving planners and conspirators for their roles in the crimes. The War on Terrorism is a different proposition, however, and a different model of governmental action—not ...


Damage Control? A Comment On Professor Neuman’S Reading Of Reno V. Aadc, David Cole Jan 2000

Damage Control? A Comment On Professor Neuman’S Reading Of Reno V. Aadc, David Cole

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This comment responds to an article by Professor Gerald Neuman on the Supreme Court's recent decision in Reno v. American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee (AADC). The Court in AADC rejected a selective prosecution claim by immigrants targeted for deportation based on First Amendment-protected activities, finding that Congress had stripped the federal courts of jurisdiction over such claims, and that in any event the Constitution does not recognize a selective prosecution objection to a deportation proceeding. Professor Neuman argues that the decision should not be read as implying that aliens have less First Amendment protection than citizens, and that the decision can ...


Introduction, Malvina Halberstam Jan 1989

Introduction, Malvina Halberstam

Articles

No abstract provided.