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Series

Race

2005

Faculty Scholarship

Civil Rights and Discrimination

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Controlling Identity: Plessy, Privacy, And Racial Defamation, Jonathan Kahn Jan 2005

Controlling Identity: Plessy, Privacy, And Racial Defamation, Jonathan Kahn

Faculty Scholarship

This Article explores the origins of privacy law in early twentieth century America in relation to the legal solidification of Jim Crow in the aftermath of Plessy v. Ferguson. It considers some distinctively southern aspects of the origins of the right to privacy and argues that by viewing privacy, racial defamation, and Jim Crow in relation to each other, we can gain new insights into each-coming to understand that Plessy was not just about controlling space, or property, or even equality but also about controlling identity itself, and coming to see that in its origins, the right to privacy had ...


Tragedy & Remedy: Reparations For Disparities In Black Health, Kevin Outterson Jan 2005

Tragedy & Remedy: Reparations For Disparities In Black Health, Kevin Outterson

Faculty Scholarship

The Tragedy of American health care is the stubborn persistence of disparities in Black health, one hundred and forty years after Emancipation, and more than four decades after the passage of Title VI. Formal legal equality has not translated into actual health equality. This Tragedy is deeper and older than mere legal forms; it has been supported by powerful social institutions, including some governments, charities, market participants, religions, ideologies, and cultures. Black health disparities interact with other vestiges of slavery such as disparities in wealth, education, employment and housing. They have permeated the American health experience. Efforts to eliminate Black ...


Against Prediction: Sentencing, Policing, And Punishing In An Actuarial Age, Bernard E. Harcourt Jan 2005

Against Prediction: Sentencing, Policing, And Punishing In An Actuarial Age, Bernard E. Harcourt

Faculty Scholarship

Actuarial methods – i.e., the use of statistical rather than clinical methods on large datasets of criminal offending rates to determine different levels of offending associated with one or more group traits, in order to (1) predict past, present or future criminal behavior and (2) administer a criminal justice outcome – now permeates the criminal law and its enforcement. With the single exception of racial profiling against African-Americans and Hispanics, most people view the turn to the actuarial as efficient, rational, and wealth-maximizing. The fact is, law enforcement agencies can detect more crime with the same resources if they investigate citizens ...