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References To Classic American Novels In Advocacy And Judicial Opinions, Douglas E. Abrams Jan 2023

References To Classic American Novels In Advocacy And Judicial Opinions, Douglas E. Abrams

Faculty Publications

With this Journal of the Missouri Bar article, the survey of courts’ cultural markers returns to literature – particularly American literature. Besides “To Kill a Mockingbird,” federal and state courts in their written opinions have cited and quoted from other classic novels written by American authors, including "Catch-22", "Moby-Dick", and "The Grapes of Wrath".


The Intersections Among Science, Technology, Policy And Law: In Between Truth And Justice, Paolo Davide Farah, Justo Corti Varela Jan 2023

The Intersections Among Science, Technology, Policy And Law: In Between Truth And Justice, Paolo Davide Farah, Justo Corti Varela

Book Chapters

Different visions on the interaction between science, technology, policy and law have been presented. As common axe, we can detect the continuous search for truth and justice. Science and Law as social constructs, the distinction between truths and opinions through procedural method based on evidence and rationality, or how natural science “things” became facts, and consequently “truth”, are examples of this search. The evidence-gathering process that integrates scientific evidence into trial (sometimes by procedure and other times by a more substantive approach) is another possible approach. Of course, that the game of mutual influence among the four elements creates contradictions …


Law Library Blog (April 2022): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Apr 2022

Law Library Blog (April 2022): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Law Library Blog (November 2021): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Oflaw Nov 2021

Law Library Blog (November 2021): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Oflaw

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


References To Children's Stories And Fairy Tales In Judicial Opinions And Written Advocacy, Douglas E. Abrams Sep 2020

References To Children's Stories And Fairy Tales In Judicial Opinions And Written Advocacy, Douglas E. Abrams

Faculty Publications

Jones v. State is typical of recent state and federal court decisions that have spiced substantive or procedural points with references to classic children’s stories or classic fairy tales. These literary resources have won places in American popular culture and are likely generally familiar to readers, especially when (as in Jones) the court provides any necessary context explaining the resource’s relevance to the decision.

In previous Journal of The Missouri Bar articles, I have written about judges’ invocation of an array of influential cultural markers that are generally familiar to Americans. These articles explored written opinions that accompanied substantive or …


What Probate Courts Cite: Lessons From The New York County Surrogate’S Court 2017-2018, Bridget J. Crawford Jun 2020

What Probate Courts Cite: Lessons From The New York County Surrogate’S Court 2017-2018, Bridget J. Crawford

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

By knowing what a judge cites, one may better understand what the judge believes is important, how the judge understands her work will be used, and how the judge conceives of the judicial role. Empirical scholars have devoted serious attention to the citation practices and patterns of the Supreme Court of the United States, the United States Courts of Appeals, and multiple state supreme courts. Remarkably little is known about what probate courts cite. This Article makes three principal claims — one empirical, one interpretative, and one normative. This Article demonstrates through data, derived from a study of all decrees …


Law School News: The Honorable Margaret H. Marshall: Doctor Of Laws, Honoris Causa 05-10-2020, Roger Williams University School Of Law May 2020

Law School News: The Honorable Margaret H. Marshall: Doctor Of Laws, Honoris Causa 05-10-2020, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Law Library Blog (April 2019): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Apr 2019

Law Library Blog (April 2019): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Rwu First Amendment Blog: David A. Logan's Blog: Infowars Goes To War With The First Amendment 08-15-2018, David A. Logan Aug 2018

Rwu First Amendment Blog: David A. Logan's Blog: Infowars Goes To War With The First Amendment 08-15-2018, David A. Logan

Law School Blogs

No abstract provided.


Law Library Blog (March 2018): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Mar 2018

Law Library Blog (March 2018): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Newsroom: 'You Can't Help Being In Awe' 1-30-2018, Michael M. Bowden, Edward Fitzpatrick Jan 2018

Newsroom: 'You Can't Help Being In Awe' 1-30-2018, Michael M. Bowden, Edward Fitzpatrick

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Neil Gorsuch And The Ginsburg Rules, Lori A. Ringhand, Paul M. Collings Jr. Jan 2018

Neil Gorsuch And The Ginsburg Rules, Lori A. Ringhand, Paul M. Collings Jr.

Scholarly Works

Supreme Court nominees testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee frequently invoke the so-called “Ginsburg Rule” to justify not answering questions posed to them. According to this “rule,” nominees during their testimony must avoid signaling their preferences about previously decided Supreme Court cases or constitutional issues. Using empirical data on every question asked and answered at every hearing from 1939–2017, we explore this “rule,” and its attribution to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. We demonstrate three things. First, the Ginsburg Rule is poorly named, given that the practice of claiming a privilege to not respond to certain types of questions predates the …


The Pro Bono Collaborative Project Spotlight: Rwu Law Street Law: Teaching Teens About The Law And Inspiring Future Lawyers 11-16-2017, Roger Williams University School Of Law Nov 2017

The Pro Bono Collaborative Project Spotlight: Rwu Law Street Law: Teaching Teens About The Law And Inspiring Future Lawyers 11-16-2017, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Pro Bono Collaborative Staff Publications

No abstract provided.


Law Library Blog (November 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Nov 2017

Law Library Blog (November 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Law Library Blog (October 2016): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Oct 2016

Law Library Blog (October 2016): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


17th Annual Open Government Summit: Access To Public Records Act & Open Meetings Act, 2015, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island Jul 2015

17th Annual Open Government Summit: Access To Public Records Act & Open Meetings Act, 2015, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island

School of Law Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


16th Annual Open Government Summit: Access To Public Records Act & Open Meetings Act, 2014, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island Aug 2014

16th Annual Open Government Summit: Access To Public Records Act & Open Meetings Act, 2014, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island

School of Law Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


Keeping Up With New Legal Titles, Tina M. Brooks Jan 2014

Keeping Up With New Legal Titles, Tina M. Brooks

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

In this book review, Tina M. Brooks discusses The Puzzle of Unanimity: Consensus on the United States Supreme Court by Pamela C. Corley, Amy Steigerwalt, and Artemus Ward.


15th Annual Open Government Summit: Access To Public Records Act & Open Meetings Act, 2013, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island Aug 2013

15th Annual Open Government Summit: Access To Public Records Act & Open Meetings Act, 2013, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island

School of Law Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


14th Annual Open Government Summit: Access To Public Records Act & Open Meetings Act, 2012, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island Jul 2012

14th Annual Open Government Summit: Access To Public Records Act & Open Meetings Act, 2012, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island

School of Law Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


Hollow Hopes And Exaggerated Fears: The Canon/Anticanon In Context, Mark A. Graber Dec 2011

Hollow Hopes And Exaggerated Fears: The Canon/Anticanon In Context, Mark A. Graber

Faculty Scholarship

Students of American constitutionalism should add constitutional decisions made by elected officials to the constitutional canon and the constitutional anticanon. Neither the canonical nor the anticanonical constitutional decisions by the Supreme Court have produced the wonderful results or horrible evils sometimes attributed to them. In many cases, elected officials made contemporaneous constitutional decisions that had as much influence as the celebrated or condemned judicial rulings. More often than not, judicial rulings matter more as a result of changing the political dynamics than by directly changing public policy. Law students and others interested in constitutional change, for these reasons, need to …


13th Annual Open Government Summit: Access To Public Records Act & Open Meetings Act, 2011, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island Aug 2011

13th Annual Open Government Summit: Access To Public Records Act & Open Meetings Act, 2011, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island

School of Law Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


12th Annual Open Government Summit: Access To Public Records Act & Open Meetings Act, 2010, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island Jan 2010

12th Annual Open Government Summit: Access To Public Records Act & Open Meetings Act, 2010, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island

School of Law Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


F08rs Sgb No. 13 (Statistician), Upton, Gammon, Prestridge Oct 2008

F08rs Sgb No. 13 (Statistician), Upton, Gammon, Prestridge

Student Senate Enrolled Legislation

No abstract provided.


10th Annual Open Government Summit: The Access To Public Records Act & The Open Meetings Act, 2008, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island Aug 2008

10th Annual Open Government Summit: The Access To Public Records Act & The Open Meetings Act, 2008, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island

School of Law Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


9th Annual Open Government Summit: The Access To Public Records Act & The Open Meetings Act, 2007, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island Aug 2007

9th Annual Open Government Summit: The Access To Public Records Act & The Open Meetings Act, 2007, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island

School of Law Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


Political Advocacy And Taxable Entities: Are They The Next "Loophole"?, Donald B. Tobin Jan 2007

Political Advocacy And Taxable Entities: Are They The Next "Loophole"?, Donald B. Tobin

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Docketology, District Courts And Doctrine, David A. Hoffman, Alan J. Izenman, Jeffrey Lidicker Jan 2007

Docketology, District Courts And Doctrine, David A. Hoffman, Alan J. Izenman, Jeffrey Lidicker

All Faculty Scholarship

Empirical legal scholars have traditionally modeled trial court judicial opinion writing by assuming that judges act rationally, seeking to maximize their influence by writing opinions in politically important cases. Support for this hypothesis has reviewed published trial court opinions, finding that civil rights and other "hot" topics are more likely to be explained than purportedly ordinary legal problems involved in resolving social security and commercial law cases. This orthodoxy comforts consumers of legal opinions, because it suggests that they are largely representative of judicial work. To test such views, we collected data from a thousand cases in four different jurisdictions. …


8th Annual Open Government Summit: Access To Public Records Act & Open Meetings Act, 2006, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island Aug 2006

8th Annual Open Government Summit: Access To Public Records Act & Open Meetings Act, 2006, Department Of Attorney General, State Of Rhode Island

School of Law Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


The Law Of Mediation In Texas, L. Wayne Scott Jan 2006

The Law Of Mediation In Texas, L. Wayne Scott

Faculty Articles

State law concerning mediation is continuing to develop in Texas. The Texas Alternative Dispute Resolution Act (“the Act”), passed in 1987 and codified in the Texas Civil Practice and Remedies Code, attempted to resolve Texas judicial opinions on mediation. Since the passage of the Act, a number of judicial opinions have sought to interpret and apply the Act. As such, it became public policy to encourage the peaceable resolution of disputes. Mediation is a method to accomplish that public policy. Both published and unpublished judicial opinions serve to illustrate the application of the Act and provide the only guidance that …