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Series

Litigation

2015

Discipline
Institution
Publication

Articles 1 - 30 of 32

Full-Text Articles in Law

Case Watch: Royston, Rayzor, Vickery & Williams Llp V. Lopez, Ramona L. Lampley Dec 2015

Case Watch: Royston, Rayzor, Vickery & Williams Llp V. Lopez, Ramona L. Lampley

Faculty Articles

The Texas Supreme Court effectively gave a “thumbs-up” to attorney-client arbitration agreements in Royston, Rayzor, Vickery, & Williams, LLP v. Lopez, 467 S.W.3d 494 (Tex. 2015), reh’g denied (Sept. 11, 2015). The plaintiff, Frank Lopez, hired Royston, Rayzor to represent him in a divorce. As part of the representation agreement, Lopez agreed to arbitrate any disputes arising out of the attorney-client relationship, but the law firm excluded from the arbitration agreement any claims it might have against Lopez for expenses or fees. Lopez later sued Royston, Rayzor and the firm moved to compel arbitration.

Lopez contended that the ...


Invalidated Patents And Associated Patent Examiners, Shine Tu Oct 2015

Invalidated Patents And Associated Patent Examiners, Shine Tu

Law Faculty Scholarship

This study attempts to determine whether there are common

characteristics between examiners who issue invalidated patents. This

study uses two new patent databases that code for nearly 1.7 million

patents and approximately one thousand patents that were litigated to

a 'final" judgment between 2010 and 2011. This study finds that

approximately one-third of patents that are litigated to final judgment

are found invalid. Most invalidated patents are found in technology

centers 1600, 2600, and 2700, which correspond to biotechnology and

organic chemistry, communications, and computer science, respectively.

Most patents are invalidated on prior art-type novelty and obviousness

grounds. This ...


Medicare Secondary Payer And Settlement Delay, Eric Helland, Jonathan Klick Jul 2015

Medicare Secondary Payer And Settlement Delay, Eric Helland, Jonathan Klick

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The Medicare Secondary Payer Act of 1980 and its subsequent amendments require that insurers and self-insured companies report settlements, awards, and judgments that involve a Medicare beneficiary to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The parties then may be required to compensate CMS for its conditional payments. In a simple settlement model, this makes settlement less likely. Also, the reporting delays and uncertainty regarding the size of these conditional payments are likely to further frustrate the settlement process. We provide results, using data from a large insurer, showing that, on average, implementation of the MSP reporting amendments led to ...


Newsroom: Logan On Bp Settlement, Roger Williams University School Of Law Jul 2015

Newsroom: Logan On Bp Settlement, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Slides: The Colorado River: Innovation In The Face Of Scarcity, Anne J. Castle Jun 2015

Slides: The Colorado River: Innovation In The Face Of Scarcity, Anne J. Castle

Innovations in Managing Western Water: New Approaches for Balancing Environmental, Social and Economic Outcomes (Martz Summer Conference, June 11-12)

Presenter: Anne J. Castle, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

40 slides


Slides: Restoring The Acequias: Fixing What Wasn't Broken, Will Davidson Jun 2015

Slides: Restoring The Acequias: Fixing What Wasn't Broken, Will Davidson

Innovations in Managing Western Water: New Approaches for Balancing Environmental, Social and Economic Outcomes (Martz Summer Conference, June 11-12)

Presenter: Will Davidson, Acequia Assistance Project

26 slides


Summary Of Logan V. Abe, 131 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 31 (Jun. 4, 2015), Michael S. Valiente Jun 2015

Summary Of Logan V. Abe, 131 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 31 (Jun. 4, 2015), Michael S. Valiente

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

A party incurs an expense even if a third party pays the expense on the party’s behalf, as long as the party would otherwise be legally obligated to pay the expense. Thus, costs and reasonable attorney fees that a third party paid on behalf of a litigant can be recovered under NRS 17.115(4) and NRCP 68(f)(2). In addition, a party can recover expert witness fees even if the expert did not testify at trial and was not deposed.


The Litigation Budget, Jay Tidmarsh May 2015

The Litigation Budget, Jay Tidmarsh

Journal Articles

Because of fears that litigation is too costly, reduction of litigation expenses has been the touchstone of procedural reform for the past thirty years. In certain circumstances, however, the parties have incentives—both rational and irrational—to spend more on a lawsuit than the social benefits that the case provides. Present and proposed reform efforts do not adequately address these incentives, and, in some instances, exacerbate the parties’ incentives to overspend. The best way to ensure that the cost of a lawsuit does not exceed the benefits that it provides to the parties and society is to control spending directly ...


Emotional Reaction Facilitates The Brain And Behavioral Impact Of Graphic Cigarette Warning Labels In Smokers, An-Li Wang, Steven B. Lowen, Daniel Romer, Mario Giorno, Daniel D. Langleben May 2015

Emotional Reaction Facilitates The Brain And Behavioral Impact Of Graphic Cigarette Warning Labels In Smokers, An-Li Wang, Steven B. Lowen, Daniel Romer, Mario Giorno, Daniel D. Langleben

Neuroethics Publications

Background—Warning labels on cigarette packages are an important venue for information about the hazards of smoking. The 2009 US Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act mandated replacing the current text-only labels with graphic warning labels. However, labels proposed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were challenged in court by the tobacco companies, who argued successfully that the proposed labels needlessly encroached on their right to free speech, in part because they included images of high emotional salience that indiscriminately frightened rather than informed consumers.

Methods—We used functional MRI to examine the effects of graphic warning labels ...


Video: Deposition Despots: Managing Difficult Attorneys And Witnesses, Michael Flynn, Natalie Giachos, Jeremy Singer Apr 2015

Video: Deposition Despots: Managing Difficult Attorneys And Witnesses, Michael Flynn, Natalie Giachos, Jeremy Singer

NSU Law Seminar Series

Welcome & Introduction:

7:55 to 8:00 am

Elena Rose Minicucci, JD Director, Alumni Relations, NSU Shepard Broad Law Center

  • Welcome 
  • Introduce Law Professor Michael Flynn, and attorneys Natalie Giachos, Esq. and Jeremy Singer, Esq.

Seminar Presentation

8:00 am to 8:30 am

Professor Michael Flynn, JD

Natalie Giachos, Esq. (NSU JD 2006)

Jeremy Singer, Esq. (NSU JD 2011)

Role Play: A brief role-play demonstration (10 minutes) will involve Professor Flynn as Pete, the lawyer for deponent who seeks to prevent his opposing counsel, played by Jeremy Singer, from getting answers during the deposition of Pete’s VIP client ...


The High Costs Of Incivility, David A. Grenardo Apr 2015

The High Costs Of Incivility, David A. Grenardo

Faculty Articles

Many law students come to law school after being indoctrinated by television and movies, believing that an effective lawyer must be obstreperous, obnoxious, and rude to be successful. Lawyers, they believe, must fight their opponents on every point at every corner if they want to represent their clients zealously and adequately.

Law students must recognize that incivility by lawyers can lead to significant negative consequences for the client, the attorney herself, and the legal system. Law students must also understand that lawyers can treat opposing counsel with civility while still providing robust, vigorous, and adversarial representation for their clients. This ...


Newsroom: Meet 'Tenth Justice': Solicitor General Verrilli, Roger Williams University School Of Law Feb 2015

Newsroom: Meet 'Tenth Justice': Solicitor General Verrilli, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Trending@Rwu Law: Professor Jared Goldstein's Post: A Fireside Chat With Solicitor General Donald Verrilli, Jr., Jared Goldstein Jan 2015

Trending@Rwu Law: Professor Jared Goldstein's Post: A Fireside Chat With Solicitor General Donald Verrilli, Jr., Jared Goldstein

Law School Blogs

No abstract provided.


A Jurisprudential Divide In U.S. V. Wong & U.S. V. June, Richard J. Peltz-Steele Jan 2015

A Jurisprudential Divide In U.S. V. Wong & U.S. V. June, Richard J. Peltz-Steele

Faculty Publications

In spring 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court decided two consolidated cases construing the Federal Tort Claims Act, U.S. v. Kwai Fun Wong and U.S. v June, Conservator. The Court majority, 5-4, per Justice Kagan, ruled in favor of the claimants and against the Government in both cases. On the face of the majority opinions, Wong and June come off as straightforward matters of statutory construction. But under the surface, the cases gave the Court a chance to wrestle with fundamental questions of statutory interpretation. The divide in Wong and June concerns the role of the courts vis-à-vis ...


The Future Direction Of Delaware Law (Including A Brief Exegesis On Fee Shifting Bylaws), J. Robert Brown Jr. Jan 2015

The Future Direction Of Delaware Law (Including A Brief Exegesis On Fee Shifting Bylaws), J. Robert Brown Jr.

Sturm College of Law: Faculty Scholarship

Delaware sets the governance standards for most public companies. The ability to attract corporations could not be explained solely by the existence of a favorable statutory regime. Delaware was not invariably the first or the only state to implement management friendly provisions. Given the interpretive gaps in the statute and the critical importance of the common law in the governance process, courts played an outsized role in setting legal standards. The management friendly nature of the Delaware courts contributed significantly to the state’s attraction to public corporations.

A current example of a management friendly trend in the case law ...


Rationalizing Cost Allocation In Civil Discovery, A. Benjamin Spencer Jan 2015

Rationalizing Cost Allocation In Civil Discovery, A. Benjamin Spencer

Faculty Publications

A movement is afoot to revise the longstanding presumption that in civil litigation the producing party bears the cost of production in response to discovery requests. An amendment to Rule 26( c )-which took effect in December 2015-makes explicit courts' authority to issue protective orders that shift discovery costs away from producing parties. But this authority is not new; what is new is what may be coming next-an undoing of the producer-pays presumption itself. Thus far, the sentiment to move in this direction has been slightly below the radar, advocated by probusiness interest groups and advocates before the Advisory Committee ...


Coitus And Consequences In The Legal System: An Experimental Study, Joni Hersch, Beverly Moran Jan 2015

Coitus And Consequences In The Legal System: An Experimental Study, Joni Hersch, Beverly Moran

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

Scholars have found that men who physically harm their intimate partners receive less punishment than men who harm strangers. In other words, in the criminal setting, coitus has consequences. In particular, for female victims, the consequence is often a legal system that offers little or no protection. Until the experimental study presented here, no one has asked whether the same is true in civil actions. This original experimental survey, fielded on eight hundred participants, provides the first-ever evidence on whether legal decision makers hold sexual activity against females in civil settings. Participants received four scenarios- a homicide, a workplace sexual ...


Chinese Companies And U.S. Class Actions: Securities Litigation And Product Liability, Geoffrey Sant, Charles M. Yablon, Stephen A. Radin, Kayvan Sadeghi, Christopher Seeger, Richard H. Silberberg Jan 2015

Chinese Companies And U.S. Class Actions: Securities Litigation And Product Liability, Geoffrey Sant, Charles M. Yablon, Stephen A. Radin, Kayvan Sadeghi, Christopher Seeger, Richard H. Silberberg

Articles

No abstract provided.


There Is No Such Thing As Litigation: Access To Justice And The Realities Of Adjudication, Robert Rubinson Jan 2015

There Is No Such Thing As Litigation: Access To Justice And The Realities Of Adjudication, Robert Rubinson

All Faculty Scholarship

Does a "contest by judicial process" describe litigation's "means and applications"? Overwhelmingly, no. Litigation is not about judges: it is about default judgments, settlements, plea bargains. It sometimes does not even involve judges at all. Litigation is not about trials: the amount of litigation that goes to trial is infinitesimal. It is not about "process": the process is so minimal that to dignify it with that term stretches the word beyond recognition. It is not a "contest": it is an exercise where one side has no plausible chance of winning, especially since that side either has no lawyers or ...


Class Counsel As Litigation Funders, Morris A. Ratner Jan 2015

Class Counsel As Litigation Funders, Morris A. Ratner

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Dtsa: The Litigator’S Full-Employments Act, Sharon Sandeen Jan 2015

The Dtsa: The Litigator’S Full-Employments Act, Sharon Sandeen

Faculty Scholarship

Civil litigation is expensive, both for the party bringing suit and the party that must defend against such claims. For a variety of reasons, not the least of which are the usual requests for preliminary relief and protective orders, trade secret litigation is particularly expensive. These costs can have a crippling effect on small businesses and start-up companies that are accused of trade secret misappropriation, often resulting in litigation expenses that exceed the alleged harm to the plaintiff. Such litigation is particularly costly and unjust in cases where the plaintiff asserts rights that, due to common misunderstandings about the limited ...


Can We Learn Anything About Pleading Changes From Existing Data?, Jonah B. Gelbach Jan 2015

Can We Learn Anything About Pleading Changes From Existing Data?, Jonah B. Gelbach

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

In light of the gateway role that the pleading standard can play in our civil litigation system, measuring the empirical effects of pleading policy changes embodied in the Supreme Court's controversial Twombly and Iqbal cases is important. In my earlier paper, Locking the Doors to Discovery, I argued that in doing so, special care is required in formulating the object of empirical study. Taking party behavior seriously, as Locking the Doors does, leads to empirical results suggesting that Twombly and Iqbal have had substantial effects among cases that face Rule 12(b)(6) motions post-Iqbal. This paper responds ...


A Pragmatic Approach To Interpreting The Federal Rules, Suzette M. Malveaux Jan 2015

A Pragmatic Approach To Interpreting The Federal Rules, Suzette M. Malveaux

Articles

No abstract provided.


Contracting Away Your Right To Sue: What You Need To Know About Arbitration, Ramona L. Lampley Jan 2015

Contracting Away Your Right To Sue: What You Need To Know About Arbitration, Ramona L. Lampley

Faculty Articles

Arbitration agreements that typically accompany credit card agreements and other services can work well—or work disastrously. What many consumers do not realize is that in numerous everyday interactions with banks, employers and retailers, they are waiving their right to sue in court if a dispute does arise. Given the lack of consumer familiarity with arbitration, there is an inherent fear and distrust of the system often referred to either as alternative dispute resolution or private dispute resolution. Some of that public fear and distrust is well-founded. We know that private dispute resolution poses the opportunity for businesses to potentially ...


Disarming Employees: How American Employers Are Using Mandatory Arbitration To Deprive Workers Of Legal Protection, Jean R. Sternlight Jan 2015

Disarming Employees: How American Employers Are Using Mandatory Arbitration To Deprive Workers Of Legal Protection, Jean R. Sternlight

Scholarly Works

Employers’ imposition of mandatory arbitration constricts employees’ access to justice. The twenty percent of the American workforce covered by mandatory arbitration clauses file just 2,000 arbitration claims annually, a minuscule number even compared to the small number of employees who litigate claims individually or as part of a class action. Exploring how mandatory arbitration prevents employees from enforcing their rights the Article shows employees covered by mandatory arbitration clauses (1) win far less frequently and far less money than employees who litigate; (2) have a harder time obtaining legal representation; (3) are often precluded from participating in class, collective ...


Trademark Extortion Revisited: A Response To Vogel And Schachter, Kenneth L. Port Jan 2015

Trademark Extortion Revisited: A Response To Vogel And Schachter, Kenneth L. Port

Faculty Scholarship

Trademark bullying (a.k.a. trademark extortion) is a very controversial notion in trademark litigation in the United States. There, for sure, is a lot of illegitimate trademark infringement happening. Anecdotally, we also know that trademark holders often overstep in the assertion of their otherwise legitimate rights. For the first time, this article documents how large a problem trademark bullying is and how often it happens. Trademark bullying occurs when there is evidence that a trademark holder asserts a non-famous mark against a non-competing entity on or in connection with goods or services into which the plaintiff has no reasonable ...


Advancing National Intellectual Property Policies In A Transnational Context, Marketa Trimble Jan 2015

Advancing National Intellectual Property Policies In A Transnational Context, Marketa Trimble

Scholarly Works

The increasing frequency with which activities involving intellectual property (“IP”) cross national borders now warrants a clear definition of the territorial reach of national IP laws so that parties engaging in the activities can operate with sufficient notice of the laws applicable to their activities. Legislators, however, have not devoted adequate attention to the territorial delineation of IP law; in fact, legislators rarely draft IP statutes with any consideration of cross-border scenarios, and with few exceptions IP laws are designed with only single-country scenarios in mind. Delineating the reach of national IP laws is actually a complex matter because the ...


All Together Now: Using Principles Of Group Dynamics To Train Better Jurors, Sara Gordon Jan 2015

All Together Now: Using Principles Of Group Dynamics To Train Better Jurors, Sara Gordon

Scholarly Works

We ask juries to make important decisions that have a profound impact on people’s lives. We leave these decisions in the hands of groups of laypeople because we hope that the diverse range of experiences and knowledge in the group will lead to more thoughtful and informed decisionmaking. Studies suggest that diverse groups of jurors have different perspectives on evidence, engage in more thorough debate, and more closely evaluate facts. At the same time, there are a variety of problems associated with group decisionmaking, from the loss of individual motivation in group settings, to the vulnerability of groups to ...


Litigation Isolationism, Pamela K. Bookman Jan 2015

Litigation Isolationism, Pamela K. Bookman

Faculty Scholarship

Over the past two decades, U.S. courts have pursued a studied avoidance of transnational litigation. The resulting litigation isolationism appears to be driven by courts’ desire to promote separation of powers, international comity, and the interests of defendants. This Article demonstrates, however, that this new kind of “avoidance” in fact frequently undermines not only these values but also other significant U.S. interests by continuing to interfere with foreign relations and driving plaintiffs to sue in foreign courts.

This Article offers four contributions: First, it focuses the conversation about transnational litigation on those doctrines designed to avoid it—that ...


Does The Quality Of The Plaintiffs' Law Firm Matter In Deal Litigation?, David Webber, Adam B. Badawi Jan 2015

Does The Quality Of The Plaintiffs' Law Firm Matter In Deal Litigation?, David Webber, Adam B. Badawi

Faculty Scholarship

This Article examines how the stock market reacts to the filing of lawsuits against mergers and acquisitions targets as the quality of the plaintiffs’ law firm varies. Our primary dataset includes all cases of this type filed in the Delaware Chancery Court from November 2003–September 2008. We group the law firms that file these suits into higher and lower quality categories using several quantitative and qualitative measures. We hypothesize that target firm share value should reflect the likelihood that litigation will result in an increase in merger consideration. This effect is likely to depend, at least in part, on ...