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Legal history

Legal History

University of Richmond

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Reports Of Cases In The Court Of Chancery From 1683 To 1688, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 2024

Reports Of Cases In The Court Of Chancery From 1683 To 1688, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

This collection of law reports brings together in one place the reports of cases in the Court of Chancery from the short tenure of Sir Francis North, lord Guilford, and that of Sir George Jeffreys, Lord Jeffreys, who was the Lord Chancellor during the reign of King James II. These reports have been scattered heretofore, but it is hoped that, by reprinting them in one place, they can be more easily comprehended individually and the jurisprudence of this court can be better understood. They come from the reigns of King Charles II and King James II, and date from 1683 …


Federal Rules Of Private Enforcement, Luke Norris, David L. Noll Jan 2023

Federal Rules Of Private Enforcement, Luke Norris, David L. Noll

Law Faculty Publications

The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure were made for a different world. Fast approaching their hundredth anniversary, the Rules reflect the state of litigation in the first few decades of the twentieth century and the then-prevailing distinction between "substantive" rights and the "procedure" used to adjudicate them. The role of procedure, the rulemakers believed, was to resolve private disputes fairly and efficiently. Today, a substantial portion of litigation in federal court is brought under regulatory statutes that deploy private lawsuits to enforce public regulatory policy. This type of litigation, which scholars refer to as "private enforcement," is the engine for …


Edward Barradall's Reports Of Cases In The General Court Of Virginia (1733-1741), William Hamilton Bryson Jan 2023

Edward Barradall's Reports Of Cases In The General Court Of Virginia (1733-1741), William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

Edward Barradall was born in London, the son of Henry Barradall and Catherine Blumfield Barradall. He was baptized on 17 October 1703 in the parish church of St. Paul's, Covent Garden. Both of his brothers and two of his sisters came to Virginia in the 1730s. Edward Barradall was in Virginia by February 1731. From at least then until about 1733, he practiced law in the county courts of Caroline County and the Northern Neck. His law reports begin in 1733, and so it is to be presumed that that is the year he moved his practice from the county …


Alexander Forrester's Chancery Reports, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 2023

Alexander Forrester's Chancery Reports, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

This is a new edition of Alexander Forrester's Chancery reports. It is based upon the best manuscript copy that has survived, Lincoln's Inn MSS. Misc. 52 and Misc. 54, and the first printed edition. The edition that was first published in 1741 included only the cases from 1732 to 1739. Compared to the copy in Lincoln's Inn, they are not much different in quality from each other. The cases in the 1741 edition are the basis for this edition as far as they go. The learned apparatus of the third edition by John Griffith Williams (d. 1799) has not been …


Reports Of Cases By Lord Hardwicke, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 2021

Reports Of Cases By Lord Hardwicke, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

Philip Yorke, earl of Hardwicke (1690-1764) was the Lord Chancellor of Great Britain from 1737 to 1756. He had a brilliant legal mind, and his memory is still celebrated today.

These reports are taken from Lord Hardwicke's opinions in other cases. Thus, being statements by Lord Hardwicke of these cases, in that sense, they are his reports of these cases. The text published here has been massaged into the standard format for law reports. However, originally, it was Lord Hardwicke's treatment of these reports as legal precedents for other cases that were before him for decision, which precedents he followed …


Mcculloch V. Madison: John Marshall's Effort To Bury Madisonian Federalism, Kurt T. Lash Jan 2020

Mcculloch V. Madison: John Marshall's Effort To Bury Madisonian Federalism, Kurt T. Lash

Law Faculty Publications

"In his engaging and provocative new book, The Spirit of the Constitution: John Marshall and the 200-Year Odyssey of McCulloch v. Maryland, David S. Schwartz challenges McCulloch’s canonical status as a foundation stone in the building of American constitutional law. According to Schwartz, the fortunes of McCulloch ebbed and flowed depending on the politics of the day and the ideological commitments of Supreme Court justices. Judicial reliance on the case might disappear for a generation only to suddenly reappear in the next. If McCulloch v. Maryland enjoys pride of place in contemporary courses on constitutional law, Schwartz argues, then this …


English Statutes In Virginia, 1660-1714, John R. Pagan Jan 2017

English Statutes In Virginia, 1660-1714, John R. Pagan

Law Faculty Publications

Virginia had a government of dual legislative authorities in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Under the transatlantic const itution- an evolving framework of legal relations within England's empire- both the Crown and the General Assembly had jurisdiction to prescribe laws for the colony. The Crown occasionally required Virginians to enforce acts of Parliament, but for the most part the imperial government allowed colonists to deviate from the metropolitan model and enact legislation tailored to their own needs, provided they refrained from passing statutes contrary or repugnant to English law. Instead of delineating separate spheres of imperial and provincial legislative …


Law Books In The Libraries Of Colonial Virginians, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 2017

Law Books In The Libraries Of Colonial Virginians, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

Of all professionals, lawyers are the most dependent on books. All of their resource material is in written form. To know the quality of the practicing bar, the bench, legal studies, and legal scholarship in general, one must know the books on which they are founded. A census of law books present in the libraries of colonial Virginians can shed some light on the law and the lawyers who shaped the colony and the nation.


Sir Robert Raymond's Common Law Reports (1694-1696), William Hamilton Bryson Jan 2016

Sir Robert Raymond's Common Law Reports (1694-1696), William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

Robert Raymond was born on 20 December 1673 in London. He was the only son of Sir Thomas Raymond (1627-1683), a judge and law reporter. He was formally admitted to Gray's Inn, his father's inn, at the age of nine in 1682. He was a student at Eton College and Christ's College, Cambridge. Raymond was called to the bar of Gray's Inn in November 1697, and he joined ad eundem Lincoln's Inn in 1710. He was the Solicitor General from 1710 until 1714 and Attorney General from 1720 to 1724. He was a member of Parliament from 1710 to 1724. …


John Merefield's Common Pleas Reports, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 2015

John Merefield's Common Pleas Reports, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

John Merefield of Crewkerne, Somerset, was admitted to the Inner Temple on 14 February 1612, and he was called to the bar on 15 October 1620. He gave readings in 1621 and 1641; on 4 November 1638, he was called to the bench. Merefield was created a serjeant in October 1660, and he died in October 1666.


Fourteen Cases From Herbert Jacob's Queen's Bench Reports, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 2015

Fourteen Cases From Herbert Jacob's Queen's Bench Reports, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

Herbert Jacob was admitted to the Inner Temple on 3 June 1692, called to the bar on 28 June 1699, and called to the bench of the Inner Temple on 22 November 1721. He died in 1725.

Harvard Law School MS. 4081 [formerly MS. 2136] is a collection of Queen's Bench reports dating from 1702 to 1706. This manuscript consists of two books, which are attributed to Herbert Jacob, a barrister of the Inner Temple. The cases in volume one and volume two, ff. 1-71v, are the same reports as 2 Lord Raymond 755-1252, 92 E.R. 4-325. Volume two, ff. …


Thomas Bold's Chancery Reports, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 2015

Thomas Bold's Chancery Reports, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

Thomas Bold was born in 1695, the son of William Bold of St. Bride's Parish, London. He entered Westminster School in 1708 and Christ Church, Oxford, on 23 June 1713. Bold received his B.A. in 1718 and an M.A. in 1721. He was admitted as a law student at the Middle Temple on 15 June 1711 and called to the bar on 31 May 1717. He was admitted ad eundem at Lincoln's Inn on 23 November 1717.


Book Review: The Cambridge History Of Law In America Vol. 1: Early American (1580-1815), William Hamilton Bryson Jan 2009

Book Review: The Cambridge History Of Law In America Vol. 1: Early American (1580-1815), William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

The book under review is a survey of the influence of law on mainland British North America up to about 1815.


On Federalism, Freedom, And The Founders' View Of Retained Rights - A Reply To Randy Barnett, Kurt T. Lash Jan 2008

On Federalism, Freedom, And The Founders' View Of Retained Rights - A Reply To Randy Barnett, Kurt T. Lash

Law Faculty Publications

In A Textual-Historical Theory of the Ninth Amendment, 60 Stanford Law Review, I explain how some of the most common theories of the Ninth Amendment either have nothing to do with the actual text of the Amendment or place the text in conflict with similar terms in the Tenth Amendment. Focusing on the actual words of the Amendment, I argue that the text of the Ninth point towards a federalist rule of construction in which the people's retained rights are necessarily left to the control of the collective people in the several states. I also explain how this reading fits …


Review On Commentaries On The Laws Of England: A Facsimile Of The First Edition Of 1765-1769, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 1981

Review On Commentaries On The Laws Of England: A Facsimile Of The First Edition Of 1765-1769, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

A book review on, Commentaries on the Laws of England: A Facsimile of the First Edition of 1765-1769, by W. Blackstone.


Intellectual Life In The Colonial South, 1585-1763, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 1978

Intellectual Life In The Colonial South, 1585-1763, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

A book review on, Intellectual Life in the Colonial South, 1585-1763, by Richard Beale Davis.


William Senior (1862-1937), Legal Historian, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 1972

William Senior (1862-1937), Legal Historian, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

Upon receiving from Clare College, Cambridge, a William Senior scholarship to continue my studies in legal history, I enquired about the man whose generosity was being extended to me. No one knew anything about him. Therefore, I collected the information for this short piece as much out of curiosity as piety. Having done so, I discovered a legal historian and scholar of moderate proportions who does not deserve such complete neglect. Had he been a teacher or a politician, my efforts might have been rewarded by the discovery of more personal information about the man himself. As it is, very …