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Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Law

Foreword: Behind The Classroom: An Examination Of Law Schools In The 21st Century, Brandon Stump Jan 2019

Foreword: Behind The Classroom: An Examination Of Law Schools In The 21st Century, Brandon Stump

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

No abstract provided.


Tenure Redux, Jacqueline D. Lipton Jan 2018

Tenure Redux, Jacqueline D. Lipton

Articles

This essay is a reflection on some of the questions that arose during the author's tenure process that are likely pertinent to others on the tenure track today particularly with respect to questions about writing style in tenure pieces, and on whether early scholars should focus on general law reviews or specialty journals--depending on their areas of expertise--or a combination of both. It also reflects on choice of subject matter for tenure work, and whether some of that work may or may not stand the test of time, as well as on differences between the U.S. legal scholarship ...


Afterword: What's Next? Into A Third Decade Of Latcrit Theory, Community, And Praxis, Steven W. Bender, Francisco Valdes, Jorge R. Roig, Jasmine Gonzalez Rose, Saru Matambanadzo, Roberto Corrada, Shelley Cavalieri, Tayyab Mahmud, Zsea Bowmani, Anthony E. Varona Jan 2018

Afterword: What's Next? Into A Third Decade Of Latcrit Theory, Community, And Praxis, Steven W. Bender, Francisco Valdes, Jorge R. Roig, Jasmine Gonzalez Rose, Saru Matambanadzo, Roberto Corrada, Shelley Cavalieri, Tayyab Mahmud, Zsea Bowmani, Anthony E. Varona

Scholarly Works

In this multi-vocal Afterword, we reflect-personally and collectively to help chart renewed agendas toward and through a third decade of LatCrit theory, community, and praxis. This personal collective exercise illustrates and reconsiders the functions, guideposts, values, and postulates for our shared programmatic work a framework for our daily work as individuals and teams through our portfolio of projects, which in turn emerged as a "reflection and projection of LatCrit theory, community and praxis." These early anchors expressly encompassed (1) a call to recognize and accept the inevitable political nature of U.S. legal scholarship; (2) a concomitant call toward anti-subordination ...


The Market Myth And Pay Disparity In Legal Academia, Paula A. Monopoli Jan 2016

The Market Myth And Pay Disparity In Legal Academia, Paula A. Monopoli

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Lawyers And Spoiled Identity, Paul Campos Jan 2015

Lawyers And Spoiled Identity, Paul Campos

Articles

No abstract provided.


Legal Academia And The Blindness Of The Elites, Paul Campos Jan 2014

Legal Academia And The Blindness Of The Elites, Paul Campos

Articles

No abstract provided.


Self-Congratulation And Scholarship, Paul Campos Jan 2013

Self-Congratulation And Scholarship, Paul Campos

Articles

Professor Jay Silver’s criticism of the reform proposals put forward in Brian Tamanaha’s book Failing Law Schools displays some characteristic weaknesses of American legal academic culture. These weaknesses include a tendency to make bold assertions about the value of legal scholarship and the effectiveness of law school pedagogy, while at the same time providing no support for these assertions beyond a willingness to repeat self-congratulatory platitudes about who professors are and what we do. The high costs for our students of the current scholarly expectations at American law schools are clear. What is not clear is whether those ...


Teaching Law In The University: Shaping Future Generations, Jack Tsen-Ta Lee Nov 2011

Teaching Law In The University: Shaping Future Generations, Jack Tsen-Ta Lee

Research Collection School Of Law

This paper, which was written for the book The Practice of Law (Singapore: LexisNexis, 2011), gives an insight into what teaching law in a Singapore university is like from the perspective of a young law academic. It considers various aspects of an academic’s job – research and writing, teaching, and administration, for instance – and provides pointers on how one might best position oneself for an academic career.


A Derivatives Market In Legal Academia, Paul H. Edelman Jan 2009

A Derivatives Market In Legal Academia, Paul H. Edelman

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

Building on the success of derivatives markets in the financial arena, I show how similar markets can be used to hedge risk in legal academia. Prudent use of these markets will generate cash, mitigate errors in hiring, and increase the academic prestige of law schools. In short, they can do for legal academia what they have already done to the financial world.


Professionalism’S Triple E Query: Is Legal Academia Enhancing, Eluding, Or Evading Professionalism?, Nicola A. Boothe-Perry Jan 2009

Professionalism’S Triple E Query: Is Legal Academia Enhancing, Eluding, Or Evading Professionalism?, Nicola A. Boothe-Perry

Journal Publications

The focus of this Article will be law schools' specific role and responsibility in the propaedeutic instruction of professionalism in the legal community. This article is composed of five sections. Part II of this paper discusses the ubiquitous yet illusory definition of professionalism. Part III addresses the practicing bar's approach to the issue of professionalism, reflecting in Subsection A on the public's perception of lawyers, and discussing in Subsection B the response of the governing bodies to such perception. Part IV highlights the role of legal education in fostering professionalism, discussing in Subsection A the fertile ground for ...


Dunya, Marianne Wesson Jan 2008

Dunya, Marianne Wesson

Articles

No abstract provided.


“Kulturkampf[S]” Or “Fit[S] Of Spite”?: Taking The Academic Culture Wars Seriously, Sylvia R. Lazos Jan 2005

“Kulturkampf[S]” Or “Fit[S] Of Spite”?: Taking The Academic Culture Wars Seriously, Sylvia R. Lazos

Scholarly Works

Polarization and heated debate within legal academia are nothing new. Some might argue that vigorous contentiousness, even if not always civil, is essential to a healthy intellectual culture. Others would note that lawyers, legal academics especially, are a highly contentious bunch with a reputation for aggressive behavior.

Fundamentally, this Article asks whether strife and disagreement are a necessary part of academic discourse. The Article describes the academic Kulturkampfs aimed at Critical Race Theory that have taken place in the last ten years both outside of and within the Critical Race Theory (CRT) movement. The Article particularly examines what it is ...