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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Law

Advising Venture & Early-Stage Client: Issues Confronting Early-Stage Companies, Carroll D. Hurst Nov 2014

Advising Venture & Early-Stage Client: Issues Confronting Early-Stage Companies, Carroll D. Hurst

William & Mary Annual Tax Conference

No abstract provided.


Advising Venture & Early-Stage Clients: Current Ear-To-The-Ground Assessment, Gary D. Leclair Nov 2014

Advising Venture & Early-Stage Clients: Current Ear-To-The-Ground Assessment, Gary D. Leclair

William & Mary Annual Tax Conference

No abstract provided.


Net Investment Income Tax Planning, Jeanne M. Sullivan Nov 2014

Net Investment Income Tax Planning, Jeanne M. Sullivan

William & Mary Annual Tax Conference

No abstract provided.


What Went Wrong: Prudent Management Of Endowment Funds And Imprudent Endowment Investing Policies, James J. Fishman Jan 2014

What Went Wrong: Prudent Management Of Endowment Funds And Imprudent Endowment Investing Policies, James J. Fishman

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

Most colleges and universities of all sizes have an endowment, a fund that provides a stream of income and maintains the corpus of the fund in perpetuity. Organizations with large endowments, such as colleges, universities, and private foundations, all finance a significant part of their operations through the return received from the investment of this capital. This article examines the legal framework for endowment investing, endowment investing policies, their evolution to more sophisticated and riskier strategies, and the consequences evinced during the financial crisis of 2008 and beyond. It traces the approaches to endowment investing and chronicles the rise and, …


Differentiating Among International Investment Disputes, Julie A. Maupin Jan 2014

Differentiating Among International Investment Disputes, Julie A. Maupin

Faculty Scholarship

Can investor-state arbitration tribunals, which exercise jurisdiction over limited claims involving discrete parties, render awards that deliver individualized justice while also promoting systemic fairness, predictability and coherence? The answer, I argue, is a qualified yes – provided that the methods employed are tailored to the particular characteristics of each dispute. Using three well-known investment arbitrations as case studies, I illustrate that investor-state disputes vary widely in terms of their socio-legal, territorial, and political impacts. Significant variances along these three dimensions call for a differentiated approach to investor-state dispute resolution. I outline what such an approach might look like and analyze …