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Full-Text Articles in Law

Reforming Legal Education To Prepare Law Students Optimally For Real-World Practice, John M. Lande Jan 2013

Reforming Legal Education To Prepare Law Students Optimally For Real-World Practice, John M. Lande

Faculty Publications

This article synthesizes major points in the October 2012 symposium of the University of Missouri School of Law Center for the Study of Dispute Resolution, entitled "Overcoming Barriers in Preparing Law Students for Real-World Practice." There is a growing consensus that American law schools need to do a better job of preparing students to practice law. Teaching students to think like a lawyer is still necessary but it is not sufficient for students to act like a lawyer soon after they graduate.


The Future Of Music: Reconfiguring Public Performance Rights, Gary Myers, George Howard Apr 2010

The Future Of Music: Reconfiguring Public Performance Rights, Gary Myers, George Howard

Faculty Publications

This article focuses on two concrete measures to improve the music industry prognosis. Public performance rights have long been an important piece of the economic pie that helps support the music business. This article suggests that the scope of public performance rights should be fundamentally reassessed and expanded. This expansion involves two specific and complementary reconfigurations.


The Law And Economics Of Identity, Rafael Gely Jan 2007

The Law And Economics Of Identity, Rafael Gely

Faculty Publications

A growing number of legal scholars have written about the demands that society and particular employers have placed on non-traditional employees to perform their identities, “or make themselves palatable” to their employers, by comporting with the criteria that the institution values. These authors have forcefully made the argument that some of these requirements are actually a form of class subordination; as a response, they argue for various forms of legal intervention.


The Law And Economics Of Employee Information Exchange In The Knowledge Economy, Rafael Gely, Leonard Bierman Apr 2004

The Law And Economics Of Employee Information Exchange In The Knowledge Economy, Rafael Gely, Leonard Bierman

Faculty Publications

Mr. Fowler's story illustrates nicely how, in the new economy, knowledge has become both the key production process component and an important object of exchange itself. While knowledge has always been a component of economic activity, it has become “the one factor of production” capable of increasing the productive capacity of both capital and labor. Mr. Fowler's story also reminds us that, as it was the case in years past, the interests of employers and employees do not necessarily coincide when it comes to allocating rights regarding the ownership and exchange of knowledge.Interestingly, this transition towards a ...


A Challenge To The Rationale For General Economic Crime Sentence Increases Following Sarbanes-Oxley, Frank O. Bowman Iii Apr 2003

A Challenge To The Rationale For General Economic Crime Sentence Increases Following Sarbanes-Oxley, Frank O. Bowman Iii

Faculty Publications

I am writing in response to the Commission's request for comment published in the Federal Register on January 17, 2003. I will address the question of whether the base offense level and/or the loss table of U.S.S.G. § 2B1.1 should be further modified to provide across-the-board sentence increases for economic crime offenders at virtually all loss levels. In my view, no case for doing so has yet been made.


Editor's Observations: The 2001 Economic Crime Package: A Legislative History, Frank O. Bowman Iii Jul 2000

Editor's Observations: The 2001 Economic Crime Package: A Legislative History, Frank O. Bowman Iii

Faculty Publications

On April 6, 2001, the U.S. Sentencing Commission approved a group of amendments to guidelines governing the sentencing of economic crimes. These measures, collectively known to as the “economic crime package,” are the culmination of some six years of deliberations by both the Conaboy and Murphy Sentencing Commissions working together with interested outside groups such as the defense bar, the Justice Department, probation officers, and the Criminal Law Committee of the U.S. Judicial Conference, The package contains three basic components. First, the now-separate theft and fraud guidelines, Sections 2B1.1 and 2F1.1, will be consolidated into a ...


A Judicious Solution: The Criminal Law Committee Draft Redefinition Of The Loss Concept In Economic Crime Sentencing, Frank O. Bowman Iii Jan 2000

A Judicious Solution: The Criminal Law Committee Draft Redefinition Of The Loss Concept In Economic Crime Sentencing, Frank O. Bowman Iii

Faculty Publications

In December 1999, the United States Sentencing Commission (Commission), an institution that had been in suspended animation for over a year with all seven voting seats vacant, fluttered its eyelids and came back to life. An agreement between the Senate and the White House produced seven new Commissioners: five sitting federal judges, the former General Counsel of the Commission, and a law professor. The new group began work immediately, making itself accessible in meetings with lawyers and judges around the country, exuding an air of intelligence and collegiality, and dispensing in short order with a backlog of amendments to the ...


Environmental Inequity: Economic Causes, Economic Solutions, Thom Lambert, Christopher Boerner Jan 1997

Environmental Inequity: Economic Causes, Economic Solutions, Thom Lambert, Christopher Boerner

Faculty Publications

The article examines one such shortcoming: namely, that existing research fails to account for the dynamic nature of the housing market. Analyzing data from the St. Louis metropolitan area, this study finds that economic factors--not siting discrimination--are behind many claims of environmental racism. This phenomenon suggests the need to develop public policies that fit the economic nature of the problem. In particular, a policy that compensates individuals living near industrial sites is the key to securing environmental justice.


Striker Replacements: A Law, Economics, And Negotiations Approach, Rafael Gely, Leonard Bierman Apr 1995

Striker Replacements: A Law, Economics, And Negotiations Approach, Rafael Gely, Leonard Bierman

Faculty Publications

In this article, we directly attack Professors Wachter and Cohen's assertion regarding the economic efficiency of the Mackay doctrine. Applying internal and external labor market analysis, we argue that the Mackay doctrine is economically inefficient because it allows employers to behave “opportunistically” with respect to employees that have made “firm-specific” investments in their employing firms. To remedy this problem we propose a new “negotiations approach,” the components of which are: (1) the statutory overruling of Mackay, and (2) the concomitant amendment of the NLRA to make the striker replacement issue a “mandatory” subject of collective bargaining.


Mortgage Prepayment Clauses: An Economic And Legal Analysis, Dale A. Whitman Jan 1993

Mortgage Prepayment Clauses: An Economic And Legal Analysis, Dale A. Whitman

Faculty Publications

Most mortgages on income-producing real estate (as distinct from owner-occupied housing) contain clauses restricting early payment of the loan. These clauses are highly controversial, and borrowers often resist their enforcement. While other writers have discussed prepayment clauses in the recent legal literature, my objectives in this article are to advance this discussion in three respects: first, to provide an economic perspective on mortgage prepayment as support for a set of legal recommendations; second, to consider whether the bankruptcy of the mortgagor should affect enforceability of a prepayment fee clause; and third, to analyze the cumulative effect of the presence in ...