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Full-Text Articles in Law

In Times Of Chaos: Creating Blueprints For Law School Responses To Natural Disasters, Jeffrey R. Baker, Christine E. Cerniglia, Davida Finger, Luz E. Herrera, Jonel Newman Jan 2020

In Times Of Chaos: Creating Blueprints For Law School Responses To Natural Disasters, Jeffrey R. Baker, Christine E. Cerniglia, Davida Finger, Luz E. Herrera, Jonel Newman

Faculty Scholarship

A recent onslaught of domestic natural disasters created acute, critical needs for legal services for people displaced and harmed by storms and fires. In 2017, Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, Maria and Michael struck much of Texas, Florida, and Puerto Rico, displacing millions from their homes. Wildfires burned throughout California and tested the capacity of pro bono and legal aid systems across the state. In 2018, Hurricane Florence flooded North Carolina, and Hurricane Michael devastated the Florida Panhandle. California again suffered wildfires, the largest and most devastating in recorded history. Natural disasters are both more common and more destructive, the “new abnormal ...


Heat Waves: Legal Adaptation To The Most Lethal Climate Disaster (So Far), Michael B. Gerrard Jan 2018

Heat Waves: Legal Adaptation To The Most Lethal Climate Disaster (So Far), Michael B. Gerrard

Faculty Scholarship

The worst heatwave in modern history occurred in Russia in 2010; its rare combination of extreme temperatures and long duration killed an estimated 55,000 people. Under an RCP 8.5 scenario, comparable heat waves could occur every two years in the eastern United States by the end of the century, and by then in Europe, the legendary heat wave of 2003 “would be classed as an anomalously cold summer relative to the new climate.” These increased temperatures and heat waves are not just occurring randomly. The science is clear that human activities – mostly greenhouse gas emissions and deforestation – are ...


Law In The Time Of Cholera: Teaching Disaster Law As A Research Course, Neal R. Axton Jan 2011

Law In The Time Of Cholera: Teaching Disaster Law As A Research Course, Neal R. Axton

Faculty Scholarship

Disaster law is fun to teach but it has a serious purpose. Emergencies will inevitably arise but how society responds to them will determine whether or not they become full-blown disasters. Training law students to adapt to dynamic situations will give them the skills they need in a world facing global warming, resource depletion, and a burgeoning population. By creating a more robust legal system, we can create a more resilient society.

Originally published in the May 2011 issue of AALL Spectrum.


Participation And Disintermediation In A Risk Society, Robert J. Rhee Jan 2008

Participation And Disintermediation In A Risk Society, Robert J. Rhee

Faculty Scholarship

The chapter argues that financing extreme catastrophic loss will become more problematic as catastrophes become more frequent and severe. An effective strategy must increase the level of participation in the spreading of risk and loss. Currently, risk spreading is done largely through insurers and government as they are the default aggregators of private and public capital. An enlargement of participation may mean the disintermediation of the traditional insurance and public compensation functions, thus allowing more direct and efficient participation between those are exposed to risk and those who are willing to bear it. This chapter also argues that tax policy ...


Evaluating Katrina: A Snapshot Of Renters’ Rights Following Disasters, Olympia Duhart, Eloisa C. Rodriguez-Dod Jan 2007

Evaluating Katrina: A Snapshot Of Renters’ Rights Following Disasters, Olympia Duhart, Eloisa C. Rodriguez-Dod

Faculty Scholarship

Hurricane Katrina destroyed the homes of many people living in parts of the Gulf Region. The storm displaced as many as 800,000 victims and it is still difficult for them to return home. Consequently, many homeowners have turned to renting because of the slow recovery process. Renters face added difficulties; they are often the last in line for government benefits and other assistance. There is much hostility towards the rights of renters, creating even more difficulties for them. This article focuses on the difficulties facing evacuee renters in New Orleans following the disaster. These renters face such obstacles as ...