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Series

Contracts

2013

Discipline
Institution
Publication

Articles 1 - 23 of 23

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Ambiguous Nature Of Copyright Users' Rights, Pascale Chapdelaine Dec 2013

The Ambiguous Nature Of Copyright Users' Rights, Pascale Chapdelaine

Law Publications

In this article, I investigate the nature of exceptions to copyright infringement or users' rights. Are exceptions to copyright infringement rights or privileges? Are they mandatory? While copyright users' rights and interests have triggered interest and debate amongst scholars, relatively less attention has been given to defining their precise nature, and on the consequences of the main characteristics of exceptions to copyright infringement on copyright law and policy. I examine the interplay between the users' rights set out in the Copyright Act and how they can be altered or overridden by non-negotiated standard end-user agreements and TPMs. To this end ...


Visual Clarity In Contract Drafting, Karin Mika Dec 2013

Visual Clarity In Contract Drafting, Karin Mika

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

No abstract provided.


Qu'ils Mangent Des Contrats: Rethinking Justice In Eu Contract Law, Daniela Caruso Jul 2013

Qu'ils Mangent Des Contrats: Rethinking Justice In Eu Contract Law, Daniela Caruso

Faculty Scholarship

The concern for justice in the context of EU contract law was central to a scholarly initiative that led, in 2004, to the publication of a Social Justice Manifesto. The Manifesto had the explicit goal of steering the Commission’s harmonization agenda away from purely neoliberal goals and towards a socially conscious law of private exchange. Contract law would be designed at the EU level so as to become (or remain, depending on the baseline of each member state) palatable to weaker parties. Today, in the many parts of Europe devastated by rising poverty, dire unemployment rates, and collapsing social ...


Vertical Boilerplate, James Gibson May 2013

Vertical Boilerplate, James Gibson

Law Faculty Publications

Despite what we learn in law school about the “meeting of the minds,” most contracts are merely boilerplate—take-it-or-leave-it propositions. Negotiation is nonexistent; we rely on our collective market power as consumers to regulate contracts’ content. But boilerplate imposes certain information costs because it often arrives late in the transaction and is hard to understand. If those costs get too high, then the market mechanism fails. So how high are boilerplate’s information costs? A few studies have attempted to measure them, but they all use a “horizontal” approach—i.e., they sample a single stratum of boilerplate and assume ...


Remedies: A Guide For The Perplexed, Doug Rendleman Apr 2013

Remedies: A Guide For The Perplexed, Doug Rendleman

Scholarly Articles

Remedies is one of a law student’s most practical courses. Remedies students and their professors learn to work with their eyes on the question at the end of litigation: what can the court do for the successful plaintiff? Remedies develops students’ professional identities and broadens their professional horizons by reorganizing their analysis of procedure, torts, contracts, and property around choosing and measuring relief - compensatory damages, punitive damages, an injunction, specific performance, disgorgement, and restitution. This article discusses the law-school course in Remedies - the content of the Remedies course, the Remedies classroom experience, and Remedies outside the classroom through research ...


Sex Matters: Considering Gender In Consumer Contracts, Amy J. Schmitz Apr 2013

Sex Matters: Considering Gender In Consumer Contracts, Amy J. Schmitz

Faculty Publications

We hear about the so-called “War on Women” and persisting salary gaps between men and women in the popular media, but contracts scholars and policymakers rarely discuss gender. Instead, dominant voices in the contracts field often reflect classical and economics-driven theories built on assumptions of gender neutral and economically rational actors. Furthermore, many mistakenly assume that market competition and antidiscrimination legislation address any improper biases in contracting. This Article therefore aims to shed light on gender’s importance by distilling data from my own e-survey of Colorado consumers along with others’ research regarding gender differences in contract outcomes, interests and ...


Index Theory: The Law, Promise, And Failure Of Financial Indices, Andrew Verstein Jan 2013

Index Theory: The Law, Promise, And Failure Of Financial Indices, Andrew Verstein

Lecturer and Other Affiliate Scholarship Series

Financial indices, like the S&P 500 or the Consumer Price Index, have become a ubiquitous feature of our financial markets. One index, the London InterBank Offered Rate ("Libor"), may be the world’s most important number, an interest rate benchmark upon which hundreds of trillions of dollars depend. Yet, almost every day new revelations emerge that Libor was tampered with during the height of the financial crisis by one or many of the world's most prominent banks, with billions of dollars potentially misappropriated. This index disruption has attracted tremendous interest from regulators, private litigants, and market observers. Despite ...


American Exceptionalism In Consumer Arbitration, Amy J. Schmitz Jan 2013

American Exceptionalism In Consumer Arbitration, Amy J. Schmitz

Faculty Publications

“American exceptionalism” has been used to reference the United States’ outlier policies in various contexts, including its love for litigation. Despite Americans’ reverence for their “day in court,” their zest for contractual freedom and efficiency has prevailed to result in U.S. courts’ strict enforcement of arbitration provisions in both business-to-business (“B2B”) and business-to-consumer (“B2C”) contracts. This is exceptional because although most of the world joins the United States in generally enforcing B2B arbitration under the New York Convention, many other countries refuse or strictly limit arbitration enforcement in B2C relationships due to concerns regarding power imbalances and public enforcement ...


From Lord Coke To Internet Privacy: The Past, Present, And Future Of Electronic Contracting, Juliet M. Moringiello, William L. Reynolds Jan 2013

From Lord Coke To Internet Privacy: The Past, Present, And Future Of Electronic Contracting, Juliet M. Moringiello, William L. Reynolds

Faculty Scholarship

Contract law is applied countless times every day, in every manner of transaction large or small. Rarely are those transactions reflected in an agreement produced by a lawyer; quite the contrary, almost all contracts are concluded by persons with no legal training and often by persons who do not have a great deal of education. In recent years, moreover, technological advances have provided novel methods of creating contracts. Those facts present practitioners of contract law with an interesting conundrum: The law must be sensible and stable if parties are to have confidence in the security of their arrangements; but contract ...


Love And Contracts In Don Quixote, Martha M. Ertman Jan 2013

Love And Contracts In Don Quixote, Martha M. Ertman

Faculty Scholarship

Viewing love as a contract seems, initially, like mistaking windmills for giants, or a peasant girl for a grand lady. This chapter seeks, like Don Quixote, to convince readers to suspend their practiced views of everyday relationships in order to see them in a new light. What seems crazy at first glance may come to look as good, and sometimes better, than the more conventional view. As a law professor, I usually write about love and contracts by focusing on legal opinions and statutes, and recently I have added real-life stories from books and newspapers, as well as my friends ...


Cisg As Basis Of A Comprehensive International Sales Law, Larry A. Dimatteo Jan 2013

Cisg As Basis Of A Comprehensive International Sales Law, Larry A. Dimatteo

UF Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


On The Conflation Of The State Secrets Privilege And The Totten Doctrine, D. A. Jeremy Telman Jan 2013

On The Conflation Of The State Secrets Privilege And The Totten Doctrine, D. A. Jeremy Telman

Law Faculty Publications

The state secrets privilege (SSP) has become a major hindrance to litigation that seeks to challenge abuses of executive power in the context of the War on Terror. The Supreme Court first embraced and gave shape to the SSP as an evidentiary privilege in a 1953 case, United States v. Reynolds. Increasingly, the government relies on the SSP to seek pre-discovery dismissal of suits alleging torts and constitutional violations by the government. Lower federal courts have permitted such pre-discovery dismissal because they have confused the SSP with a non-justiciability doctrine derived from an 1875 case, Totten v. United States. The ...


Ensuring Remedies To Cure Cramming, Amy J. Schmitz Jan 2013

Ensuring Remedies To Cure Cramming, Amy J. Schmitz

Faculty Publications

The unauthorized addition of third party charges to telecommunications bills ("cramming") is a growing problem that has caught the attention of federal regulators and state attorney generals. This Article therefore discusses the problems associated with cramming, and highlights consumers’ uphill battles in seeking remedies with respect to cramming claims. Indeed, it is imperative for policymakers, researchers, consumer advocates, and industry groups to collaborate in developing means for resolving these claims. Accordingly, this Article offers a proposal for resolving cramming disputes in order to advance this collaboration, and inspire development of a functioning online dispute resolution ("ODR") process to handle these ...


Contract Theory And The Failures Of Public-Private Contracting, Wendy Netter Epstein Jan 2013

Contract Theory And The Failures Of Public-Private Contracting, Wendy Netter Epstein

All Faculty Scholarship

The market for public-private contracting is huge and flawed. Public-private contracts for services such as prisons and welfare administration tend to result in cost savings at the sacrifice of quality service. For instance, to cut costs, private prisons skimp on security. Public law scholars have studied these problems for decades and have proposed various public law solutions. But the literature is incomplete because it does not approach the problem through a commercial lens. This Article fills that gap. It considers how economic analysis of contract law, in particular efficiency theory and agency theory, bear upon the unique problems of public-private ...


Beyond Notice And Choice: Privacy, Norms, And Consent, Richard Warner, Robert Sloan Jan 2013

Beyond Notice And Choice: Privacy, Norms, And Consent, Richard Warner, Robert Sloan

All Faculty Scholarship

Informational privacy is the ability to determine for yourself when and how others may collect and use your information. Adequate informational privacy requires a sufficiently broad ability to give or withhold free and informed consent to proposed uses.

Notice and Choice (sometimes also called “notice and consent”) is the current paradigm for consent online. The Notice is a presentation of terms, typically in a privacy policy or terms of use agreement. The Choice is an action signifying acceptance of the terms, typically clicking on an “I agree” button, or simply using the website. Recent reports by the Federal Trade Commission ...


Prostitution 3.0?, Scott R. Peppet Jan 2013

Prostitution 3.0?, Scott R. Peppet

Articles

This Article presents an entirely novel approach to prostitution reform focused on incremental market improvement facilitated by information law and policy. Empirical evidence from the economics and sociology of sex work shows that new, Internet-enabled, indoor forms of prostitution may be healthier, less violent, and more rewarding than traditional street prostitution. This Article argues that these existing "Prostitution 2.0" innovations have not yet improved sex markets sufficiently to warrant legalization. It suggests that creating a new "Prostitution 3.0" that solves the remaining problems of disease, violence, and coercion in prostitution markets is possible, but would require removing legal ...


The Riai Standard Form Of Contract 2012 Edition: A Review, Tony Cunningham Jan 2013

The Riai Standard Form Of Contract 2012 Edition: A Review, Tony Cunningham

Other Resources

The RIAI ‘yellow’ and ‘blue’ Forms of Contracts have been recently amended and published as the 2012 edition. The yellow form where quantities form part of the contract is identical to the 2011 edition and has been republished as the 2012 edition. The 2011 version superseded the 2002 version. This paper reviews and synopsises the provisions of the 2012 RIAI ‘yellow’ form of contract and identifies the principle changes to the 2002 edition.


Segmented Settlements Are Not The Answer: A Response To Professor Squire’S Article, How Collective Settlements Camouflage The Costs Of Shareholder Lawsuits, Christopher C. French Jan 2013

Segmented Settlements Are Not The Answer: A Response To Professor Squire’S Article, How Collective Settlements Camouflage The Costs Of Shareholder Lawsuits, Christopher C. French

Journal Articles

In his recent article, Professor Richard Squire offers a provocative theory in which he claims the underlying claimants in shareholder litigation against corporate policyholders are overcompensated due to what he describes as “cramdown” settlements, under which insurers are forced to settle due to the “duty to contribute” that arises under multi-layered directors and officers (“D&O”) insurance programs. He also offers a novel idea regarding how this problem could be fixed by what he refers to as “segmented” settlements in which each insurer and the policyholder would be allowed to settle separately and consider only its own interests in doing ...


Contract As Pattern Language, Erik F. Gerding Jan 2013

Contract As Pattern Language, Erik F. Gerding

Articles

Christopher Alexander’s architectural theory of a "pattern language" influenced the development of object-oriented computer programming. This pattern language framework also explains the design of legal contracts. Moreover, the pattern language rubric explains how legal agreements interlock to create complex transactions and how transactions interconnect to create markets. This pattern language framework helps account for evidence, including from the global financial crisis, of failures in modern contract design.

A pattern represents an encapsulated conceptual solution to a recurring design problem. Patterns save architects and designers from having to reinvent the wheel; they can use solutions that evolved over time to ...


Mandating Precontractual Disclosure, Eric H. Franklin Jan 2013

Mandating Precontractual Disclosure, Eric H. Franklin

Scholarly Works

Parties negotiating an arm's-length contract are generally not required to disclose facts to one another. Although this default rule is supported by both centuries of common law and freedom of contract principles, courts and legislatures treat certain transactions differently. This is particularly true in circumstances in which the default rule results in an unacceptable harm suffered by a broad group of persons. In such cases, lawmakers have acted to impose precontractual disclosure obligations. These decisions and statutes are largely reactive: A harm is identified in a certain transaction's precontractual period and disclosure is mandated to rectify the harm ...


Effective Contract Drafting: Indentifying The Building Blocks Of Contracts, Lori D. Johnson Jan 2013

Effective Contract Drafting: Indentifying The Building Blocks Of Contracts, Lori D. Johnson

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Review Essay, Learning Contracts Through Current Events: Lawrence Cunningham's Contracts In The Real World, Stories Of Popular Contracts And Why They Matter, Miriam A. Cherry Jan 2013

Review Essay, Learning Contracts Through Current Events: Lawrence Cunningham's Contracts In The Real World, Stories Of Popular Contracts And Why They Matter, Miriam A. Cherry

All Faculty Scholarship

This is a review essay of Professor Lawrence Professor Cunningham’s book Contracts in the Real World: Stories of Popular Contracts and Why They Matter (Cambridge 2012). As implied by the title, the book discusses contract law through the lens of well-known cases and celebrities. Along the way, readers will meet intellectuals such as poet Maya Angelou and the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., as well as celebrities known for controversy, like Paris Hilton, Donald Trump, and Charlie Sheen. Professor Cunningham also deftly analyzes some of the notable contract law issues arising from the global financial crisis and the ...


The Competitive Consequences Of Most-Favored-Nation Provisions, Jonathan Baker, Judith A. Chevalier Jan 2013

The Competitive Consequences Of Most-Favored-Nation Provisions, Jonathan Baker, Judith A. Chevalier

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

"Most Favored Nation" contractual provisions have come under scrutiny in recent years by antitrust authorities in both the US and EU. MFNs are a type of vertical agreement between suppliers and buyers. The literature has recognized that there may be efficiency rationales for these arrangements but the literature has also recognized that these arrangements have anticompetitive potential. In this paper, we distill the economics literature on MFNs to explore both possibilities.