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2010

Torts

Institution
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Articles 1 - 30 of 75

Full-Text Articles in Law

Summary Of Fanders V. Riverside Resort & Casino, 126 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 50, Bracken Longhurst Dec 2010

Summary Of Fanders V. Riverside Resort & Casino, 126 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 50, Bracken Longhurst

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

An appeal of an Eighth Judicial District Court’s summary judgment in a tort action against a former employer and co-employees based on the exclusivity provisions of the workers’ compensation statutes that arose around the time of employment termination.


Mainstreaming Privacy Torts, Danielle K. Citron Dec 2010

Mainstreaming Privacy Torts, Danielle K. Citron

Faculty Scholarship

In 1890, Samuel Warren and Louis Brandeis proposed a privacy tort and seventy years later, William Prosser conceived it as four wrongs. In both eras, privacy invasions primarily caused psychic and reputational wounds of a particular sort. Courts insisted upon significant proof due to those injuries’ alleged ethereal nature. Digital networks alter this calculus by exacerbating the injuries inflicted. Because humiliating personal information posted online has no expiration date, neither does individual suffering. Leaking databases of personal information and postings that encourage assaults invade privacy in ways that exact significant financial and physical harm. This dispels concerns that plaintiffs might ...


Privacy Torts: Unreliable Remedies For Lgbt Plaintiffs, Anita L. Allen Oct 2010

Privacy Torts: Unreliable Remedies For Lgbt Plaintiffs, Anita L. Allen

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

In the United States, both constitutional law and tort law recognize the right to privacy, understood as legal entitlement to an intimate life of one’s own free from undue interference by others and the state. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (“LGBT”) persons have defended their interests in dignity, equality, autonomy, and intimate relationships in the courts by appealing to that right. In the constitutional arena, LGBT Americans have claimed the protection of state and federal privacy rights with a modicum of well-known success. Holding that homosexuals have the same right to sexual privacy as heterosexuals, Lawrence v. Texas symbolizes ...


Summary Of San Juan V. Psc Industrial Outsourcing, 126 Nev. Adv. Op. 35, Jonathan Winn Oct 2010

Summary Of San Juan V. Psc Industrial Outsourcing, 126 Nev. Adv. Op. 35, Jonathan Winn

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Supreme Court affirmed the district court’s summary judgment ruling in favor of PSC as to third party vicarious liability for the torts of an independent contractor. Specifically, the court held PSC, as hirer of independent contractor DTI, was not liable under the peculiar risk doctrine regardless of whether the independent contractor was incompetent or insolvent.


Harry Potter And The Trouble With Tort Theory, Scott Hershovitz Oct 2010

Harry Potter And The Trouble With Tort Theory, Scott Hershovitz

Law & Economics Working Papers

Economists argue that tort law promotes an efficient allocation of resources to safety, while philosophers contend that it dispenses corrective justice. Despite the divide, the leading tort theories share something in common: They are grounded in an unduly narrow view of tort. Both economists and philosophers confuse the institution of tort law with the rules that are distinctive of it. They offer theories of tort’s substantive rules, but for the most part ignore the procedures by which those rules are implemented. As a consequence, both miss and misconstrue much about tort law.

The problem is particularly acute for economists ...


Epstein's Razor, David G. Owen Oct 2010

Epstein's Razor, David G. Owen

Faculty Publications

Richard Epstein, over a long and distinguished career, has offered inspired insights into how a legal system should be framed to serve the goals of those it governs. In that pursuit, he has relentlessly applied a sharp logic - call it Epstein's Razor - to shave away the detritus of complexity and confusion that surround perplexing problems, leaving standing only truths unscathed by competition among ideas. Over decades of diverse writings on law and political theory, highlighted by his elegant Simple Rules for a Complex World, Professor Epstein offers a vision of law constructed on the view that simplicity in law ...


Reaching Equilibrium In Tobacco Litigation, James A. Henderson Jr., Aaron Twerski Oct 2010

Reaching Equilibrium In Tobacco Litigation, James A. Henderson Jr., Aaron Twerski

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Recent pro-plaintiff developments in tobacco litigation may lead to the conclusion that such litigation will go on endlessly and threaten the financial viability of the tobacco industry. This article takes the opposite position. Although the industry may take some near-term losses, it is far more likely that tobacco companies will survive short-term losses and that tobacco litigation will reach a stable equilibrium within the next fifteen to twenty years. The threat of third-party payer claims is no longer viable. Courts have unanimously rejected them. With the exception of cases pending in Florida and West Virginia, there are few individual personal ...


Taxing Punitive Damages, Gregg D. Polsky, Dan Markel Sep 2010

Taxing Punitive Damages, Gregg D. Polsky, Dan Markel

Scholarly Works

There is a curious anomaly in the law of punitive damages. Jurors assess punitive damages in the amount that they believe will best “punish” the defendant. But, in fact, defendants are not always punished to the degree that the jury intends. Under the Internal Revenue Code, punitive damages paid by business defendants are tax deductible and, as a result, these defendants often pay (in real dollars) far less than the jury believes they deserve to pay.

To solve this problem of under-punishment, many scholars and policymakers, including President Obama, have proposed making punitive damages nondeductible in all cases. In our ...


Summary Of Boorman V. Nevada Memorial Cremation Society And Clark County Coroner’S Office, 126 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 29, David Krawczyk Jul 2010

Summary Of Boorman V. Nevada Memorial Cremation Society And Clark County Coroner’S Office, 126 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 29, David Krawczyk

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

No abstract provided.


Re-Examining Acts Of God, Jill M. Fraley Jul 2010

Re-Examining Acts Of God, Jill M. Fraley

Scholarly Articles

For more than three centuries, tort law has included the notion of an act of God as something caused naturally, beyond both man's anticipation and control. Historically, the doctrine applied to extraordinary manifestations of the forces of nature, including floods, earthquakes, blizzards, and hurricanes. Despite the significance of the doctrine, particularly in large-scale disasters, scholars rarely engage the act of God defense critically. However, recently, the doctrine has received more substantial criticism. Denis Binder argued that the doctrine should be repudiated as merely a restatement of existing negligence principles Joel Eagle criticized the doctrine, suggesting that it should not ...


Bending Nature, Bending Law, David Owen Jul 2010

Bending Nature, Bending Law, David Owen

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Story Of Us: Resolving The Face-Off Between Autobiographical Speech And Information Privacy, Sonja R. West Jul 2010

The Story Of Us: Resolving The Face-Off Between Autobiographical Speech And Information Privacy, Sonja R. West

Scholarly Works

Increasingly more “ordinary” Americans are choosing to share their life experiences with a public audience. In doing so, however, they are revealing more than their own personal stories, they are exposing private information about others as well. The face-off between autobiographical speech and information privacy is coming to a head, and our legal system is not prepared to handle it.

In a prior article, I established that autobiographical speech is a unique and important category of speech that is at risk of being undervalued under current law. This article builds on my earlier work by addressing the emerging conflict between ...


Responsibility In Negligence: Why The Duty Of Care Is Not A Duty “To Try”, Ori J. Herstein Jul 2010

Responsibility In Negligence: Why The Duty Of Care Is Not A Duty “To Try”, Ori J. Herstein

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Even though it offers a compelling account of the responsibility-component in the negligence standard—arguably the Holy Grail of negligence theory—it is a mistake to conceive of the duty of care in negligence as a duty to try to avert harm. My goal here is to explain why and to point to an alternative account of the responsibility-component in negligence.

The flaws in conceiving of the duty of care as a duty to try are: failing to comport with the legal doctrine of negligence and failing as a revisionary account for the law; overly burdening autonomy and restricting the ...


Summary Of Renown Health, Inc. V. Vanderford, 126 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 24, Kristopher Milicevic Jul 2010

Summary Of Renown Health, Inc. V. Vanderford, 126 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 24, Kristopher Milicevic

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

Appeal from a district court’s interlocutory order granting partial summary judgment to Vanderford based on the imposition of a nondelegable duty on Renown Health, Inc. The question on appeal was whether a hospital owes an absolute nondelegable duty to provide competent medical care to emergency room patients through independent contractor doctors.


Summary Of Strickland V. Waymire, 126 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 25, Keith Pickard Jul 2010

Summary Of Strickland V. Waymire, 126 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 25, Keith Pickard

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

Appeal from a district court summary judgment ordering appellants’ recall elections to proceed based upon a reading of Article 2, Section 9 of the Nevada Constitution whereby any registered voter may sign the recall petition to reach the 25% numerical threshold. The Supreme Court unanimously held that only those voters who actually voted in the election which seated the officials may count toward the 25% threshold.


Summary Of Betsinger V. D.R. Horton, Inc., Et Al., 126 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 17, Mark Hesiak May 2010

Summary Of Betsinger V. D.R. Horton, Inc., Et Al., 126 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 17, Mark Hesiak

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

An appeal and cross appeal from a jury verdict in favor of prospective home buyer who prevailed in a deceptive trade practice action against a home builder and its financing division.


Insurance In Sociolegal Research, Tom Baker May 2010

Insurance In Sociolegal Research, Tom Baker

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Insurance has a long history in sociolegal research, most prominently as a window on accident compensation and related tort law in action. Recent work has extended that research, with the result that tort law in action may be the best mapped of any legal field outside criminal law. Sociological research has begun to explore insurance as a form of governance, with effects in many legal fields and across the economy. This essay reviews developments in both bodies of work. Part one examines the relationship between liability insurance and tort law in action using the metaphors of window and frame. Part ...


Aggregation, Community, And The Line Between, Elizabeth Chamblee Burch May 2010

Aggregation, Community, And The Line Between, Elizabeth Chamblee Burch

Scholarly Works

As class-action theorists, we sometimes focus so heavily on the class certification threshold that we neglect to reassess the line itself. The current line asks whether procedurally aggregated individuals form a sufficiently cohesive group before the decision to sue. Given this symposium’s topic - the state of aggregate litigation and the boundaries of class actions in the decade after Amchem Products, Inc. v. Windsor and Ortiz v. Fibreboard Corp. - the time is ripe to challenge our assumptions about this line in non-class aggregation. Accordingly, this Article examines group cohesion and asks whether the current line is the only dividing line ...


Summary Of Posas V. Horton, 126 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 12, Amy C. Ma Apr 2010

Summary Of Posas V. Horton, 126 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 12, Amy C. Ma

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

Appeal from a district court judgment entering a jury verdict in favor of the defendant, where the district court gave the jury sudden-emergency instruction for an automobile collision case.


Summary Of Saylor V. Arcotta, 126 Nev. Adv. Op. 9, Karlee Phelps Mar 2010

Summary Of Saylor V. Arcotta, 126 Nev. Adv. Op. 9, Karlee Phelps

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court held that the district court erred in granting summary judgment and dismissing appellant’s equitable indemnity and contribution claims. Equitable indemnity and contribution claims are governed by statutes of limitation, separate from the statute applicable to the underlying tort. Accordingly, the Court reversed the grant of summary judgment and remanded to the district court for further proceedings.


Bond Limited Liability, Robert J. Rhee Mar 2010

Bond Limited Liability, Robert J. Rhee

UF Law Faculty Publications

Limited liability is considered a “birthright” of corporations. The concept is entrenched in legal theory, and it is a fixed reality of the political economy. But it remains controversial. Scholarly debate has been engaged in absolute terms of defending the rule or advocating its abrogation. Though compelling, these polar positions, often expressed in abstract arguments, are associated with disquieting effects. Without limited liability, efficiency may be severely compromised. With it, involuntary tort creditors bear some of the cost of an enterprise. Most other proposals for reforming limited liability have been incremental, such as modifying veil piercing. However, neither absolutism nor ...


The Need For A National Civil Justice Survey Of Incidence And Claiming Behavior, Theodore Eisenberg Feb 2010

The Need For A National Civil Justice Survey Of Incidence And Claiming Behavior, Theodore Eisenberg

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Civil justice issues play a prominent role in society. Family law issues such as divorce and child custody, consumer victimization issues raised by questionable trade practices, and tort issues raised by surprisingly high estimated rates of medical malpractice, questionable prescription drug practices, and other behaviors are part of the fabric of daily life. Policymakers and interest groups regularly debate and assess whether civil problems are best resolved by legislative action, agency action, litigation, alternative dispute resolution, other methods, or some combination of actions. Yet we lack systematic quantitative knowledge about the primary events in daily life that generate civil justice ...


"Controlling" Securities Fraud: Proposed Liability Standards For Controlling Persons Under The 1933 And 1934 Securities Acts, Nancy Staudt Jan 2010

"Controlling" Securities Fraud: Proposed Liability Standards For Controlling Persons Under The 1933 And 1934 Securities Acts, Nancy Staudt

Faculty Working Papers

This Student Note investigates the history and intent underlying the controlling person liability provisions of the 1933 and 1934 Securities Act. It notes that courts have adopted a ranges of standards for holding controlling persons liability, but whichever standard is chosen--that standard is applied to both Acts. This note argues that courts should impose unique liability standards for each statute in order to fully realize Congress' purpose in adopting the laws.


The "Bad Samaritan" Paradigm, Anthony D'Amato Jan 2010

The "Bad Samaritan" Paradigm, Anthony D'Amato

Faculty Working Papers

This essay will attempt to show that the disparity between the rule of law and the dictates of morality is itself a product of the paradigmatic way in which the "Bad Samaritan" cases are analyzed. If we examine the cases in an entirely different way, many of the standard problems will dissolve and new alternatives will become apparent. The essay will also show that the "Bad Samaritan" paradigm is part of a larger paradigm linking the law of torts with the criminal law, which also needs to be reexamined. Finally a recommendation for dealing with the "Bad Samaritan" problem legislatively ...


Three Obstacles To The Promotion Of Corporate Social Responsibility By Means Of The Alien Tort Claims Act: The Sosa Court's Incoherent Conception Of The Law Of Nations, The "Purposive" Action Requirement For Aiding And Abetting, And The State Action Requirement For Primary Liability, David A. Dana, Michael Barsa Jan 2010

Three Obstacles To The Promotion Of Corporate Social Responsibility By Means Of The Alien Tort Claims Act: The Sosa Court's Incoherent Conception Of The Law Of Nations, The "Purposive" Action Requirement For Aiding And Abetting, And The State Action Requirement For Primary Liability, David A. Dana, Michael Barsa

Faculty Working Papers

The ATCA could be a powerful tool to promote corporate CSR, especially in developing countries where local legal restraints are weak. But despite the good normative reasons why the ATCA should be used in this way, serious obstacles remain. The Supreme Court's ahistorical and incoherent formulation of the "law of nations" fails to promote the development of the ATCA in ways that would cover even serious environmental harm. Also, the federal courts' confused jurisprudence concerning aiding and abetting and state action creates too many loopholes through which egregious corporate behavior may slip unpunished. In order to overcome these obstacles ...


Wyeth V. Levine: What Does It Mean And Where Do Pharmaceutical Companies Go From Here, Clay Landa Jan 2010

Wyeth V. Levine: What Does It Mean And Where Do Pharmaceutical Companies Go From Here, Clay Landa

Law Student Publications

Part II of this paper analyzes the history and background of federal preemption to give context to the current environment after Wyeth. Part III analyzes the Supreme Court‘s decision in Wyeth, holding that the FDCA and corresponding regulations do not preempt state tort claims. Finally, Part IV discusses and analyzes what drug makers may do now to continue to produce and market pharmaceuticals profitably while limiting their liability for state tort claims.


The Heterogeneity Of The Value Of Statistical Life: Introduction And Overview, W. Kip Viscusi Jan 2010

The Heterogeneity Of The Value Of Statistical Life: Introduction And Overview, W. Kip Viscusi

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

The refinement in worker fatality risk data used in hedonic wage studies and evidence from new stated preference studies have facilitated the exploration of the heterogeneity of the value of statistical life (VSL). Although the median VSL estimate for workers is $7-$8 million, the VSL varies considerably within the worker population. New estimates of the income elasticity of VSL are 1.0 or above, which are consistent with theoretical models linking VSL to the coefficient of relative risk aversion. The specific relationship between VSL and risk aversion is, however, more complex than previously understood. Age differences in VSL are ...


Response, The Still-Elusive Quest To Make Sense Of Veil-Piercing, David K. Millon Jan 2010

Response, The Still-Elusive Quest To Make Sense Of Veil-Piercing, David K. Millon

Scholarly Articles

This paper is an invited comment on Peter Oh's article "Veil-Piercing" published in the Texas Law Review. I make two points. First, I suggest that Oh's exhaustive analysis of the factors cited by courts to justify veil-piercing, like Robert Thompson's before it, does not actually tell us much about what is going on in the cases. For reasons that I explain, the asserted rationales cannot determine the results. Instead, vaguely articulated and poorly understand notions of policy and fairness drive decision making in this area. The law will continue to be obscure and results unpredictable until courts ...


Mainstreaming Privacy Torts, Danielle Keats Citron Jan 2010

Mainstreaming Privacy Torts, Danielle Keats Citron

Faculty Scholarship

In 1890, Samuel Warren and Louis Brandeis proposed a privacy tort and seventy years later, William Prosser conceived it as four wrongs. In both eras, privacy invasions primarily caused psychic and reputational wounds of a particular sort. Courts insisted upon significant proof due to those injuries’ alleged ethereal nature. Digital networks alter this calculus by exacerbating the injuries inflicted. Because humiliating personal information posted online has no expiration date, neither does individual suffering. Leaking databases of personal information and postings that encourage assaults invade privacy in ways that exact significant financial and physical harm. This dispels concerns that plaintiffs might ...


Privacy As Product Safety, James Grimmelmann Jan 2010

Privacy As Product Safety, James Grimmelmann

Faculty Scholarship

Online social media confound many of our familiar expectaitons about privacy. Contrary to popular myth, users of social software like Facebook do care about privacy, deserve it, and have trouble securing it for themselves. Moreover, traditional database-focused privacy regulations on the Fair Information Practices model, while often worthwhile, fail to engage with the distinctively social aspects of these online services.

Instead, online privacy law should take inspiration from a perhaps surprising quarter: product-safety law. A web site that directs users' personal information in ways they don't expect is a defectively designed product, and many concepts from products liability law ...