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Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Consumer Interest In Corporate Law, David Yosifon Nov 2009

Consumer Interest In Corporate Law, David Yosifon

Faculty Publications

This Article provides a comprehensive assessment of the consumer interest in dominant theories of the corporation and in the fundamental doctrines of corporate law. In so doing, the Article fills a void in contemporary corporate law scholarship, which has failed to give sustained attention to consumers in favor of exploring the interests of other corporate stakeholders, especially shareholders, creditors, and workers. Utilizing insights derived from the law and behavioralism movement, this Article examines, in particular, the limitations of the shareholder primacy norm at the heart of prevailing "nexus of contracts" and "team production" theories of the firm. The Article concludes ...


A Voice-Based Framework For Evaluating Claims Of Minority Shareholder Oppression In The Close Corporation, Benjamin Means Jan 2009

A Voice-Based Framework For Evaluating Claims Of Minority Shareholder Oppression In The Close Corporation, Benjamin Means

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Unconscious Bias And The Limits Of Director Independence, Antony Page Jan 2009

Unconscious Bias And The Limits Of Director Independence, Antony Page

Faculty Publications

Corporate directors make difficult decisions: How much should we pay our CEO? Should we permit a lawsuit against a fellow director? Should we sell the company? Directors are legally obligated to decide in good faith based on the business merits of the issue rather than extraneous considerations and influences. Naturally, some directors may have preferences, or even biases: Our CEO, my colleague and friend, deserves a lot; The company should not sue my fellow board member; We should not sell, because after all, I would like to remain a board member. But the courts presume that independent directors either do ...