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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Unmerry Widow: Spousal Disinheritance And Life Insurance In North Carolina, Jeffrey S. Kinsler Jan 2009

The Unmerry Widow: Spousal Disinheritance And Life Insurance In North Carolina, Jeffrey S. Kinsler

Law Faculty Scholarship

In spite of our nation’s long-held public policy of protecting surviving spouses, some people purposely disinherit their spouses. For centuries, North Carolina more or less tolerated intentional spousal disinheritance. In 1959, in an effort to protect surviving spouses from deliberate disinheritance, North Carolina adopted a “right of dissent” statute that authorized a surviving spouse to renounce the decedent spouse’s will and receive a statutorily prescribed share (ranging from one-sixth to one-half) of the decedent spouse’s probate estate. Because the dissent statute was limited to the decedent spouse’s probate estate, it was easily circumvented through the use ...


Lost In The Maze Of Appeals: The Eleventh Circuit's Review Of Decisions By The Board Of Immigration Appeals, Amy L. Moore Jan 2009

Lost In The Maze Of Appeals: The Eleventh Circuit's Review Of Decisions By The Board Of Immigration Appeals, Amy L. Moore

Law Faculty Scholarship

The Eleventh Circuit reviews decisions made by the Board of Immigration Appeals with a very lenient substantial evidence test that incorporates the idea of compulsion. In other words, the record must compel an opposite conclusion for a decision to be overturned as opposed to merely being unsupported by substantial evidence. This article details the job of the Board of Immigration Appeals, the types of claims it hears, and the types of review applied to it by the Eleventh Circuit. A study of 251 cases from 1990 through 2008 suggests that the Eleventh Circuit hardly ever overturns the Board of Immigration ...


A Decade Later: Adarand And Croson And The Status Of Minority Preferences In Government Contracting, Lynn Ridgeway Zehrt Jan 2009

A Decade Later: Adarand And Croson And The Status Of Minority Preferences In Government Contracting, Lynn Ridgeway Zehrt

Law Faculty Scholarship

This Article analyzes sixteen decisions in an effort to assist governmental entities in achieving the noble goal of “confront[ing] the effects of racial discrimination”8 in government contracting. Part I summarizes the Supreme Court’s decisions in Adarand and Croson, focusing primarily on the Court’s definition of strict scrutiny in those decisions. It also includes a brief description of the historical development of affirmative action in government contracting. Part II explores the impact of the Adarand decision on federal programs and considers not only the statutory revisions prompted by that decision but also the subsequent appellate decisions that ...


The Game Is Afoot: Constitutionalizing The Right To Hunt And Fish In The Tennessee Constitution, Jeffrey Omar Usman Jan 2009

The Game Is Afoot: Constitutionalizing The Right To Hunt And Fish In The Tennessee Constitution, Jeffrey Omar Usman

Law Faculty Scholarship

The normative role of state constitutions, which are simultaneously paramount state law and inferior to the whims of even the most minor federal regulation, is a matter of some uncertainty. In recent years, state constitutions have been significantly affected by another wave of popular constitutionalism. As part of this movement, since 1996, seven states have adopted constitutional provisions guaranteeing a right to hunt and fish. This article explores the constitutionalization of hunting and fishing rights under state constitutions. It begins by tracing hunting and fishing rights through western legal history with a special emphasis on Ancient Rome, England, and the ...