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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Appropriations Power And Sovereign Immunity,, Jay Tidmarsh, Paul F. Figley May 2009

The Appropriations Power And Sovereign Immunity,, Jay Tidmarsh, Paul F. Figley

Journal Articles

Discussions of sovereign immunity assume that the Constitution contains no explicit text regarding sovereign immunity. As a result, arguments about the existence-or nonexistence-of sovereign immunity begin with the English and American common-law doctrines. Exploring political, fiscal, and legal developments in England and the American colonies in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, this Article shows that focusing on common-law developments is misguided. The common-law approach to sovereign immunity ended in the early 1700s. The Bankers' Case (1690- 1700), which is often regarded as the first modern common-law treatment of sovereign immunity, is in fact the last in the line of English ...


Foreseeability And Copyright Incentives, Shyamkrishna Balganesh Apr 2009

Foreseeability And Copyright Incentives, Shyamkrishna Balganesh

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Copyright law’s principal justification today is the economic theory of creator incentives. Central to this theory is the recognition that while copyright’s exclusive rights framework provides creators with an economic incentive to create, it also entails large social costs, and that creators therefore need to be given just enough incentive to create in order to balance the system’s benefits against its costs. Yet, none of copyright’s current doctrines enable courts to circumscribe a creator’s entitlement by reference to limitations inherent in the very idea of incentives. While the common law too relies on providing actors ...


Debunking Blackstonian Copyright, Shyamkrishna Balganesh Apr 2009

Debunking Blackstonian Copyright, Shyamkrishna Balganesh

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

This is a review of Neil Weinstock Netanel’s Copyright’s Paradox (2008).


What Is Specific About Specific Restitution, Colleen P. Murphy Mar 2009

What Is Specific About Specific Restitution, Colleen P. Murphy

Law Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Kf Modified And The Classification Of Canadian Common Law, F. Tim Knight Mar 2009

Kf Modified And The Classification Of Canadian Common Law, F. Tim Knight

Librarian Publications & Presentations

This article was inspired by a previous article written by Vincent DeCaen in an earlier issue of CLLR. It explores classification, the different approaches taken by KF Modified and LC Class KE, and the role KF Modified has had in organizing collections in Canadian law libraries. It argues that there is no right or wrong way to classify legal resources and suggests that KF Modified can benefit cataloguing workflow and is well suited to both the Canadian and common law library environments.


The Federal Common Law Of Nations, Anthony J. Bellia, Bradford R. Clark Jan 2009

The Federal Common Law Of Nations, Anthony J. Bellia, Bradford R. Clark

Journal Articles

Courts and scholars have vigorously debated the proper role of customary international law in American courts: To what extent should it be considered federal common law, state law, or general law? The debate has reached something of an impasse, in part because various positions rely on, but also are in tension with, historical practice and constitutional structure. This Article describes the role that the law of nations actually has played throughout American history. In keeping with the original constitutional design, federal courts for much of that history enforced certain rules respecting other nations' perfect rights (or close analogues) under the ...


Three Stories And Their Morals, Robert B. Bennett Jan 2009

Three Stories And Their Morals, Robert B. Bennett

Scholarship and Professional Work - Business

Fundamentally, the common law tradition is a collection of stories. Stories also become the law professor's stock in trade. We tell students stories or have them read stories in the form of cases or hypothetical situations and help them discern the morals to the stories-i.e., what the stories mean in the context of business or in their business lives? In a sense, that is what the Socratic Method is all about: analyzing stories in the form of cases and discerning their greater meaning. In this paper I will relate three true stories within the context of just-in-time production ...


"Everybody Knows What A Picket Line Means": Picketing Before The British Columbia Court Of Appeal, Judy Fudge, Eric Tucker Jan 2009

"Everybody Knows What A Picket Line Means": Picketing Before The British Columbia Court Of Appeal, Judy Fudge, Eric Tucker

Articles & Book Chapters

The general hostility of courts towards workers’ collective action is well documented, but even against that standard the restrictive approach of the British Columbia Court of Appeal stands out. Although this trend first became apparent in a series of cases before World War II in which the court treated peaceful picketing as unlawful and narrowly interpreted British Columbia’s Trade Union Act (1902), which limited trade unions’ common law liability, this study will focus on the court’s post-War jurisprudence. The legal environment for trade union activity was radically altered during World War II by PC 1003, which provided unions ...


Case For A Constitutional Definition Of Hearsay: Requiring Confrontation Of Testimonial, Nonassertive Conduct And Statements Admitted To Explain An Unchallenged Investigation, The, James L. Kainen, Carrie A. Tendler Jan 2009

Case For A Constitutional Definition Of Hearsay: Requiring Confrontation Of Testimonial, Nonassertive Conduct And Statements Admitted To Explain An Unchallenged Investigation, The, James L. Kainen, Carrie A. Tendler

Faculty Scholarship

Crawford v. Washington’s historical approach to the confrontation clause establishes that testimonial hearsay inadmissible without confrontation at the founding is similarly inadmissible today, despite whether it fits a subsequently developed hearsay exception. Consequently, the requirement of confrontation depends upon whether an out-of-court statement is hearsay, testimonial, and, if so, whether it was nonetheless admissible without confrontation at the founding. A substantial literature has developed about whether hearsay statements are testimonial or were, like dying declarations, otherwise admissible at the founding. In contrast, this article focuses on the first question – whether statements are hearsay – which scholars have thus far overlooked ...


Giles V. California: Sixth Amendment Confrontation Right, Forfeiture By Wrongdoing, And A Misguided Departure From The Common Law And The Constitution, 40 U. Tol. L. Rev. 577 (2009), Ralph Ruebner, Eugene Goryunov Jan 2009

Giles V. California: Sixth Amendment Confrontation Right, Forfeiture By Wrongdoing, And A Misguided Departure From The Common Law And The Constitution, 40 U. Tol. L. Rev. 577 (2009), Ralph Ruebner, Eugene Goryunov

UIC Law Open Access Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Geier V. American Honda Motor Co.: A Story Of Statutes, Regulation And The Common Law, Peter L. Strauss Jan 2009

Geier V. American Honda Motor Co.: A Story Of Statutes, Regulation And The Common Law, Peter L. Strauss

Faculty Scholarship

This essay was written as a contribution to one of Foundation's "Story" series. In Geier, a lawsuit had been brought on behalf of a teenager whose injuries from an accident might have been lessened if her car had contained an airbag. Plaintiffs sued on the straightforward basis that the design choice to omit a safety device of proven merit made the car unreasonably hazardous. Federal safety regulations had required the maker of her car to install some such device as an airbag in at least 10% of the cars it made the year it made her car – but her ...