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Full-Text Articles in Law

Legal Methods As A Point Of Reference For Comparative Studies Of Procedural Law, James Maxeiner Sep 2007

Legal Methods As A Point Of Reference For Comparative Studies Of Procedural Law, James Maxeiner

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This paper addresses the importance of comparative legal methods for study of comparative procedure.


Legal Certainty And Legal Methods: A European Alternative To American Legal Indeterminacy?, James Maxeiner Apr 2007

Legal Certainty And Legal Methods: A European Alternative To American Legal Indeterminacy?, James Maxeiner

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Americans are resigned to a high level of legal indeterminacy. This Article shows that Europeans do not accept legal indeterminacy and instead have made legal certainty a general principle of their law. This Article uses the example of the German legal system to show how German legal methods strive to realize this general European principle. It suggests that these methods are opportunities for Americans to develop their own system to reduce legal indeterminacy and to increase legal certainty.


Docketology, District Courts And Doctrine, David A. Hoffman, Alan J. Izenman, Jeffrey Lidicker Jan 2007

Docketology, District Courts And Doctrine, David A. Hoffman, Alan J. Izenman, Jeffrey Lidicker

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Empirical legal scholars have traditionally modeled trial court judicial opinion writing by assuming that judges act rationally, seeking to maximize their influence by writing opinions in politically important cases. Support for this hypothesis has reviewed published trial court opinions, finding that civil rights and other "hot" topics are more likely to be explained than purportedly ordinary legal problems involved in resolving social security and commercial law cases. This orthodoxy comforts consumers of legal opinions, because it suggests that they are largely representative of judicial work. To test such views, we collected data from a thousand cases in four different jurisdictions. …