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2005

Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility

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Articles 1 - 30 of 69

Full-Text Articles in Law

Heights Of Justice (Introduction And Front Matter), Lawrence A. Cunningham Dec 2005

Heights Of Justice (Introduction And Front Matter), Lawrence A. Cunningham

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In this pioneering book, Boston College Law School’s Academic Dean, Lawrence Cunningham, arranges selected contributions of his faculty’s scholarship into a meditation upon justice. The book weaves a combination of theory and practice to articulate moral and ethical values that facilitate rational application of law. It envisions legal arrangements imbued with commitments of the Jesuit tradition, including the dignity of persons, the common good and compassion for the poor. This reflective collection of inquiry evokes a signature motif of the BC Law faculty in dozens of different legal subjects. Materials downloadable from this abstract consist of: Table of ...


Familiar Battles For Bioethics: Facing Off Over Transplantation, Paul A. Lombardo Dec 2005

Familiar Battles For Bioethics: Facing Off Over Transplantation, Paul A. Lombardo

Faculty Publications By Year

No abstract provided.


Legal Ethics And The Separation Of Law And Morals, W. Bradley Wendel Nov 2005

Legal Ethics And The Separation Of Law And Morals, W. Bradley Wendel

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

This paper explores the jurisprudential question of the relationship between moral values and legal norms in legal advising and counseling in the context of an analysis of the so-called torture memos prepared by lawyers in the Office of Legal Counsel in 2002. The principal claim of the paper is that the torture memos are morally bankrupt because they are legally bankrupt. The lawyers' actions were wrong from a moral point of view because the lawyers failed with respect to their obligation to treat the law with respect, not simply as an inconvenient obstacle to be planned around. The morality of ...


The Professionalism Crisis: How Bar Examiners Can Make A Difference, Clark D. Cunningham Nov 2005

The Professionalism Crisis: How Bar Examiners Can Make A Difference, Clark D. Cunningham

Faculty Publications By Year

No abstract provided.


Respondeat Superior: Never Send To Know For Whom The Bell Tolls: It Tolls For Thee, Paul R. Tremblay, J. Charles Mokriski Nov 2005

Respondeat Superior: Never Send To Know For Whom The Bell Tolls: It Tolls For Thee, Paul R. Tremblay, J. Charles Mokriski

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

No abstract provided.


Unpublished Opinions And No Citation Rules In The Trial Courts, J. Thomas Sullivan Oct 2005

Unpublished Opinions And No Citation Rules In The Trial Courts, J. Thomas Sullivan

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


School Desegregation 50 Years After Brown: Misconceptions, Lessons Learned, And Hopes For The Future, Gary Orfield Oct 2005

School Desegregation 50 Years After Brown: Misconceptions, Lessons Learned, And Hopes For The Future, Gary Orfield

Center for the Study of Ethics in Society Papers

Papers presented for the Center of the Study of Ethics in Society Western Michigan University.


Imputed Conflicts Of Interest In International Law Practice, Geoffrey C. Hazard Jr. Oct 2005

Imputed Conflicts Of Interest In International Law Practice, Geoffrey C. Hazard Jr.

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Migrating Lawyers And The Ethics Of Conflict Checking, Paul R. Tremblay Sep 2005

Migrating Lawyers And The Ethics Of Conflict Checking, Paul R. Tremblay

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Lawyers often leave a practice setting and move to a new practice as their career paths advance or change. The incidence of lawyer migration has increased dramatically in the past decade, as law firms recruit more lateral hires and offer fewer partnership opportunities to their associates. As a lawyer prepares to change employment settings, her prospective new law firm asks her about the clients she has represented in the past. The new law firm must insist on this information, for without it the firm could not screen for possible conflicts of interest. Were the firm to hire a lawyer without ...


Law And Accounting: Cases And Materials (Front Matter), Lawrence A. Cunningham Sep 2005

Law And Accounting: Cases And Materials (Front Matter), Lawrence A. Cunningham

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Accounting textbooks for law or business schools invariably provide secondary narrative presentations of materials in the authors’ own words. A better approach to learning this subject is to present thematically arranged original accounting pronouncements. In so designing this innovative book, readers appreciate how accounting is a tool that provides conceptual organization to economic exchange. The tool facilitates analyzing legal, business and public policy aspects of the transactions that accounting addresses. The original accounting standards, as well as SEC enforcement actions, presented in this book illuminate why transactions are pursued and related decisions made, economic aspects of transactions, and the conceptual ...


Why I Teach (A Prescription For The Post-Tenure Blues), R. Michael Cassidy Sep 2005

Why I Teach (A Prescription For The Post-Tenure Blues), R. Michael Cassidy

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In this brief essay from a collection of articles designed to demonstrate the scope and breadth of issues in legal pedagogy, Professor Michael Cassidy explores an important psychological event for many in the legal academy - the post-tenure blues. He offers reasons to keep doing what we do - teach with joy, inspiration and a sense of purpose for the next generation. He encourages us to think of our own reasons for what keeps us going in an occupation that many of us think is one of the best in the world.


The 'Abuse Excuse' In Capital Sentencing Trials: Is It Relevant To Responsibility, Punishment, Or Neither?, Paul J. Litton Jul 2005

The 'Abuse Excuse' In Capital Sentencing Trials: Is It Relevant To Responsibility, Punishment, Or Neither?, Paul J. Litton

Faculty Publications

The violent criminal who was a victim of severe childhood abuse frequently appears in the responsibility literature because he presents a difficulty for theorists who maintain the compatibility of causal determinism and our practices of holding persons responsible. The challenge is based on the fact that learning about an offender's horrific childhood mitigates the indignation that many persons feel towards him, possibly indicating that they hold him less than fully responsible. Many capital defendants present evidence of suffering childhood abuse, and many jurors find this evidence to count against imposing death. The most obvious explanation for a response like ...


The Perils Of Online Legal Research: A Caveat For Diligent Counsel, J. Thomas Sullivan Jul 2005

The Perils Of Online Legal Research: A Caveat For Diligent Counsel, J. Thomas Sullivan

Faculty Scholarship

Online legal research is emerging as a preferred tool for judges, attorneys, and lawstudents, providing a vast amount ofnearly real-time legal resources at the speed of electronic search. This article analyzes the risk of error associated with the immediacy of online opinion publishing and how the uncertainty ofaccuracy potentially compromises the litigator's ability to provide accurate advice.


A Bridle, A Prod And A Big Stick: An Evaluation Of Class Actions, Shareholder Proposals And The Ultra Vires Doctrine As Methods For Controlling Corporate Behavior, Adam Sulkowski, Kent Greenfield Jun 2005

A Bridle, A Prod And A Big Stick: An Evaluation Of Class Actions, Shareholder Proposals And The Ultra Vires Doctrine As Methods For Controlling Corporate Behavior, Adam Sulkowski, Kent Greenfield

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Written for the recent conference at St. John’s University Law School on “People of Color, Women, and the Public Corporation,” this paper evaluates recently applied methods of influencing corporate behavior on employment practices and recommends that a dormant legal doctrine be revitalized and added to the “tool box” of activists and concerned shareholders. The methods of influencing corporate behavior that are evaluated include class action lawsuits and shareholder proposals to amend corporate policy. In both contexts, there are procedural hurdles to achieving success. Even when success is achieved, there are limits to the actual changes in organizational behavior that ...


Pursuing Justice For The Mentally Disabled, Grant H. Morris Jun 2005

Pursuing Justice For The Mentally Disabled, Grant H. Morris

University of San Diego Public Law and Legal Theory Research Paper Series

This article considers whether lawyers act as zealous advocates when they represent mentally disordered, involuntarily committed patients who wish to assert their right to refuse treatment with psychotropic medication. After discussing a study that clearly demonstrates that lawyers do not do so, the article explores the reasons for this inappropriate behavior. Michael Perlin characterizes the problem as “sanism,” which he describes as an irrational prejudice against mentally disabled persons of the same quality and character as other irrational prejudices that cause and are reflected in prevailing social attitudes of racism, sexism, homophobia, and ethnic bigotry. The article critiques Perlin’s ...


Corporate Ethics In The Health Care Marketplace, Lynne Dallas May 2005

Corporate Ethics In The Health Care Marketplace, Lynne Dallas

University of San Diego Law and Economics Research Paper Series

Consider three examples of problematic corporate decision making: first, in 2002, employees were less likely to have employer-provided insurance than thirty years ago and the price of health care for those who do receive it is ever increasing. Second, while many employees are without health insurance, the compensation for chief executive officers and other executive officers has increased dramatically. Third, consider the well-publicized examples of corporate decisions to engage in fraudulent and unethical business practices.

These problems will not be solved by glib references to market ideology that claims markets alone adequately regulate corporate behavior. Nor will these problems be ...


Navigating Troubled Waters: Dealing With Personal Values When Representing Others, Mitchell M. Simon Apr 2005

Navigating Troubled Waters: Dealing With Personal Values When Representing Others, Mitchell M. Simon

Law Faculty Scholarship

Legal academics have long struggled to define the appropriate role a lawyer's moral judgment ought to play in client representation. In its simplest terms, the question is: Must a lawyer be a "hired gun," seeking all lawful objectives sought by a client, or may a lawyer act independently to avoid the harm a client's actions will cause innocent parties? Following disclosure of lawyer involvement in the Savings and Loan, Enron and WorldCom failures, many in society joined those scholars calling for greater moral responsibility.

In this article, I provide an analytical approach consistent with existing law and practice ...


Multicultural Lawyering: Teaching Psychology To Develop Cultural Self-Awareness, Carwina Weng Apr 2005

Multicultural Lawyering: Teaching Psychology To Develop Cultural Self-Awareness, Carwina Weng

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Much of the current literature in multicultural lawyering focuses on learning substantive information about clients who are culturally different from the lawyer, such as how the client’s culture perceives eye contact or reacts to science-based world views. This article notes that such a focus sidesteps the human reality that every person reacts to people who are different from him- or herself unconsciously in ways that may be culturally insensitive and discriminatory and that this human reaction occurs despite awareness of the general values, attitudes, and beliefs of the client’s culture. It therefore suggests that multicultural lawyering training should ...


Ethics In Large Law Firms: The Principle Of Pragmatism, Kimberly Kirkland Apr 2005

Ethics In Large Law Firms: The Principle Of Pragmatism, Kimberly Kirkland

Law Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Ethical And Aggressive Appellate Advocacy: Confronting Adverse Authority, J. Thomas Sullivan Apr 2005

Ethical And Aggressive Appellate Advocacy: Confronting Adverse Authority, J. Thomas Sullivan

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Faculty Ethics In Law School: Shirking, Capture, And "The Matrix", Jeffrey L. Harrison Apr 2005

Faculty Ethics In Law School: Shirking, Capture, And "The Matrix", Jeffrey L. Harrison

UF Law Faculty Publications

The primary focus of this essay is the ethical dimension of the decisions faculty governance requires law professors to make. This essay is devoted to the proposition that conditions are ideal for most law schools to be governed for the benefit of the faculty at the expense of the welfare of students and others (stakeholders) who expect to be served by the law school. This section also suggests that faculty shirking, if it occurs, stems primarily from a lack of respect for those whom the law school serves. Section II addresses the second step. Having described shirking and capture in ...


Ethical And Legal Standards In Social Work, Frederic G. Reamer Apr 2005

Ethical And Legal Standards In Social Work, Frederic G. Reamer

Faculty Publications

Social workers frequently encounter circumstances involving ethical and legal issues. In many instances, relevant ethical and legal standards complement each other; however, in some circumstances, ethical and legal standards conflict. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the relationship between U.S. ethical and legal standards in social work. The author presents a conceptually based typology of 4 types of relationships between legal and ethical standards. Case examples are included. The author concludes with a decision-making framework designed to enhance social workers' constructive management of difficult decisions involving ethical and legal standards.


The Federal Government Lawyer's Duty To Breach Confidentiality, James E. Moliterno Apr 2005

The Federal Government Lawyer's Duty To Breach Confidentiality, James E. Moliterno

Faculty Publications

The lawyer's duty of confidentiality springs from the lawyer-client relationship and its parameters are determined by the nature of that relationship. The federal government lawyer's client is like no other. The uniqueness of representing the United States calls for a unique approach to the duty of confidentiality. Unlike the private individual client, the government as a client does not speak with a single, unmistakable voice. Unlike the private entity client, the federal government has a paramount interest in the public good, including the public's right to know about government (the entity's conduct), especially its misconduct. The ...


Watch Out For Whistleblowers, Leslie C. Griffin Apr 2005

Watch Out For Whistleblowers, Leslie C. Griffin

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Melville, Slavery, And The Failure Of The Judicial Process, Steven L. Winter Mar 2005

Melville, Slavery, And The Failure Of The Judicial Process, Steven L. Winter

Law Faculty Research Publications

No abstract provided.


The Immorality Of Denial, Jonathan R. Cohen Mar 2005

The Immorality Of Denial, Jonathan R. Cohen

UF Law Faculty Publications

This article is the first of a two-part series critically examining the role of lawyers in assisting clients in denying responsibility for harms they have caused. If a person injures another, the moral response is for the injurer actively to take responsibility for what he has done. In contrast, the common practice within our legal culture is for injurers to deny responsibility for harms they commit. The immoral, in other words, has become the legally normal. In this Article, Professor Cohen analyzes the moral foundations of responsibility-taking. He also explores the moral, psychological, and spiritual risks to injurers who knowingly ...


Using Our Brains: What Cognitive Science And Social Psychology Teach Us About Teaching Law Students To Make Ethical, Professionally Responsible, Choices, Alan Lerner Jan 2005

Using Our Brains: What Cognitive Science And Social Psychology Teach Us About Teaching Law Students To Make Ethical, Professionally Responsible, Choices, Alan Lerner

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Throughout our lives, below the level of our consciousness, each of us develops values, intuitions, expectations, and needs that powerfully affect both our perceptions and our judgments. Placed in situations in which we feel threatened, or which implicate our values, our brains, relying on those implicitly learned, emotionally weighted, memories, may react automatically, without reflection or the opportunity for reflective interdiction. We can "downshift," to primitive, self-protective problem solving techniques. Because these processes operate below the radar of our consciousness, automatic, "emotional" reaction, rather than thoughtful, reasoned analysis may drive our responses to stressful questions of ethics and professional responsibility.


Drafting Attorneys As Fiduciaries: Fashioning An Optimal Ethical Rule For Conflicts Of Interest, Paula A. Monopoli Jan 2005

Drafting Attorneys As Fiduciaries: Fashioning An Optimal Ethical Rule For Conflicts Of Interest, Paula A. Monopoli

Faculty Scholarship

The American Bar Association recently revised the ethical rules that govern lawyers. Its Ethics 2000 Commission proposed a number of changes to the Model Rules of Professional Conduct, including revisions to the rules that affect how the profession handles conflicts of interest in the area of attorneys who draft instruments that name themselves as fiduciaries. The intersection of these changes, with their subsequent clarification by an ABA opinion issued in May 2002, has broad implications for attorneys practicing in this area. Given the increasing elderly population, the trillions of dollars that they are transferring to their baby-boomer children, and the ...


Grounding Normative Assertions: Arthur Leff's Still Irrefutable, But Incomplete, "Sez Who?" Critique, Samuel W. Calhoun Jan 2005

Grounding Normative Assertions: Arthur Leff's Still Irrefutable, But Incomplete, "Sez Who?" Critique, Samuel W. Calhoun

Scholarly Articles

The late Professor Arthur Leff believed that standard methods for grounding normative assertions fail to provide a solid foundation for moral judgment because none provides a satisfactory answer to what Leff called the grand 'sez who?' - a universal taunt by which a skeptic may challenge the standing/competency of the speaker to make authoritative moral assessments. Leff argued that as a matter of logic no system of morals premised in mankind alone ever could withstand the taunt. His provocative conclusion was that the only unchallengeable response to the grand 'sez who?' is God sez.

This Article demonstrates the continued relevance ...


The Academic Expert Before Congress: Observations And Lessons From Bill Van Alstyne's Testimony, Neal Devins Jan 2005

The Academic Expert Before Congress: Observations And Lessons From Bill Van Alstyne's Testimony, Neal Devins

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.