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2004

Legal Profession

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Articles 1 - 30 of 62

Full-Text Articles in Law

Vol. 3, No. 01 (December 2004) Dec 2004

Vol. 3, No. 01 (December 2004)

Indiana Law Update

No abstract provided.


Vol. 2, No. 09 (November 2004) Nov 2004

Vol. 2, No. 09 (November 2004)

Indiana Law Update

No abstract provided.


From The Dean, Lauren K. Robel Oct 2004

From The Dean, Lauren K. Robel

Lauren Robel (2002 Acting; 2003-2011)

No abstract provided.


Fall 2004 Oct 2004

Fall 2004

Bill of Particulars

No abstract provided.


I Do Know How She Does It (But Sometimes I Wish I Didn't), Rebecca White Oct 2004

I Do Know How She Does It (But Sometimes I Wish I Didn't), Rebecca White

Scholarly Works

I care deeply about the issue of women's attrition from the legal profession. Admittedly, I have not written any scholarly work on this exact topic. When I learned who the other symposium guests were and how much extensive work they have done on this subject, I was left to wonder what I could contribute to our discussion. I have not conducted any empirical studies; I do not have any new and brilliant insight. What I do have, is experience. I have performed ‘the juggling act’ that simultaneous full-time lawyering and mothering requires. I have worked part-time in a large ...


Chicken Little Lives: The Anticipated And Actual Effect Of Sarbanes-Oxley On Corporate Lawyers' Conduct, Susan Saab Fortney Oct 2004

Chicken Little Lives: The Anticipated And Actual Effect Of Sarbanes-Oxley On Corporate Lawyers' Conduct, Susan Saab Fortney

Faculty Scholarship

This article addresses the controversy surrounding the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which was seen by many lawyers as threatening the relationship between lawyers and their corporate clients. Part I of this article introduces the topic by providing a brief history of the increased government regulation and enforcement actions that forced lawyers to reexamine their role in representing their clients, beginning with the case of SEC v. National Student Marketing Corp. Part II reviews the organized bar's reaction to Sarbanes-Oxley. Part III focuses on law firms' response to the legislation. Part IV considers the views of individual corporate and securities ...


Strategic Judicial Lawmaking: An Empirical Investigation Of Ideology And Publication On The U.S. Court Of Appeals For The Ninth Circuit, David S. Law Sep 2004

Strategic Judicial Lawmaking: An Empirical Investigation Of Ideology And Publication On The U.S. Court Of Appeals For The Ninth Circuit, David S. Law

University of San Diego Public Law and Legal Theory Research Paper Series

Previous studies have demonstrated that, in a number of contexts, federal appeals court judges divide along ideological lines when deciding cases upon the merits. To date, however, researchers have failed to find evidence that circuit judges take advantage of selective publication rules to further their ideological preferences - for example, by voting more ideologically in published cases that have precedential effect than in unpublished cases that lack binding effect upon future panels. This article evaluates the possibility that judges engage in strategic judicial lawmaking by voting more ideologically in published cases than in unpublished cases. To test this hypothesis, all asylum ...


Prosecutorial Neutrality, Fred C. Zacharias, Bruce A. Green Sep 2004

Prosecutorial Neutrality, Fred C. Zacharias, Bruce A. Green

University of San Diego Public Law and Legal Theory Research Paper Series

This Article examines the ideal of prosecutorial neutrality in an effort to determine its value as a measure of prosecutorial conduct. Commentators often have assumed that prosecutors should be “neutral” in making discretionary decisions or have criticized prosecutors for decisions that purportedly demonstrate a lack of neutrality. The notion of prosecutorial neutrality recalls the traditional conception of prosecutors as “quasi-judicial” officers and emphasizes the distinction between prosecutors and lawyers for private parties. But the specific meaning attributed to prosecutorial neutrality has varied depending on the context. The term refers to diverse, and potentially inconsistent, views of appropriate prosecutorial conduct. The ...


Lawyers As Gatekeepers, Fred C. Zacharias Sep 2004

Lawyers As Gatekeepers, Fred C. Zacharias

University of San Diego Public Law and Legal Theory Research Paper Series

Three recent legislative and regulatory initiatives -- the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the 2003 amendments to Model Rules 1.6 and 1.13, and the Gatekeeper Initiative – all seek to enlist the assistance of lawyers in thwarting crime. Outraged opponents have relied on flamboyant rhetoric. They challenge the notion that lawyers should act as gatekeepers – which some of the opponents deem equivalent to operating like the “secret police in Eastern European countries.” This article makes a simple, and ultimately uncontroversial, point. Lawyers are gatekeepers, and always have been. Whatever one’s position on the merits of the specific reforms currently being proposed, it ...


The Hollowness Of The Harm Principle, Steven D. Smith Sep 2004

The Hollowness Of The Harm Principle, Steven D. Smith

University of San Diego Public Law and Legal Theory Research Paper Series

Among the various instruments in the toolbox of liberalism, the so-called “harm principle,” presented as the central thesis of John Stuart Mill’s classic On Liberty, has been one of the most popular. The harm principle has been widely embraced and invoked in both academic and popular debate about a variety of issues ranging from obscenity to drug regulation to abortion to same-sex marriage, and its influence is discernible in legal arguments and judicial opinions as well. Despite the principle’s apparent irresistibility, this essay argues that the principle is hollow. It is an empty vessel, alluring but without any ...


Appointing Federal Judges: The President, The Senate, And The Prisoner's Dilemma, David S. Law Sep 2004

Appointing Federal Judges: The President, The Senate, And The Prisoner's Dilemma, David S. Law

University of San Diego Public Law and Legal Theory Research Paper Series

This paper argues that the expansion of the White House's role in judicial appointments since the late 1970s, at the expense of the Senate, has contributed to heightened levels of ideological conflict and gridlock over the appointment of federal appeals court judges, by making a cooperative equilibrium difficult to sustain. Presidents have greater electoral incentive to behave ideologically, and less incentive to cooperate with other players in the appointments process, than do senators, who are disciplined to a greater extent in their dealings with each other by the prospect of retaliation over repeat play. The possibility of divided government ...


Understanding Recent Trends In Federal Regulation Of Lawyers, Fred C. Zacharias Sep 2004

Understanding Recent Trends In Federal Regulation Of Lawyers, Fred C. Zacharias

University of San Diego Public Law and Legal Theory Research Paper Series

Federal lawmakers increasingly have taken actions that contradict, interfere with, or preempt state regulation of lawyers. Most of the commentary regarding the recent federal actions has focused on whether individual regulations are substantively justified. It is, however, worth considering more broadly whether and how the phenomenon of increasing federal regulation is symptomatic of changing views of appropriate professional regulation. This article considers a series of theoretical analyses of the increasing federal regulation -- themes and trends that the increasing regulation might represent or epitomize. Whenever the bar or other commentators criticize developments in professional regulation, it is important to place their ...


The Tenuous Case For Conscience, Steven D. Smith Sep 2004

The Tenuous Case For Conscience, Steven D. Smith

University of San Diego Public Law and Legal Theory Research Paper Series

If there is any single theme that has provided the foundation of modern liberalism and has infused our more specific constitutional commitments to freedom of religion and freedom of speech, that theme is probably “freedom of conscience.” But some observers also perceive a progressive cheapening of conscience– even a sort of degradation. Such criticisms suggest the need for a contemporary rethinking of conscience. When we reverently invoke “conscience,” do we have any idea what we are talking about? Or are we just exploiting a venerable theme for rhetorical purposes without any clear sense of what “conscience” is or why it ...


Assessment Of Clinical Skills In Medicine And Law, Jayne W. Barnard Aug 2004

Assessment Of Clinical Skills In Medicine And Law, Jayne W. Barnard

Popular Media

No abstract provided.


Implicit Racial Attitudes Of Death Penalty Lawyers, Theodore Eisenberg, Sheri Lynn Johnson Jul 2004

Implicit Racial Attitudes Of Death Penalty Lawyers, Theodore Eisenberg, Sheri Lynn Johnson

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Defense attorneys commonly suspect that the defendant's race plays a role in prosecutors' decisions to seek the death penalty, especially when the victim of the crime was white. When the defendant is convicted of the crime and sentenced to death, it is equally common for such attorneys to question the racial attitudes of the jury. These suspicions are not merely partisan conjectures; ample historical, statistical, and anecdotal evidence supports the inference that race matters in capital cases. Even the General Accounting Office of the United States concludes as much. Despite McCleskey v. Kemp, in which the United States Supreme ...


Reading/Teaching Lawyer Films, James R. Elkins Jul 2004

Reading/Teaching Lawyer Films, James R. Elkins

Law Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Vol. 2, No. 07/08 (June/July 2004) Jun 2004

Vol. 2, No. 07/08 (June/July 2004)

Indiana Law Update

No abstract provided.


Vol. 2, No. 06 (May 2004) May 2004

Vol. 2, No. 06 (May 2004)

Indiana Law Update

No abstract provided.


Interview With Leon S. Forman, Jason E. Dymbort, Leon S. Forman, Legal Oral History Project, University Of Pennsylvania Carey Law School Apr 2004

Interview With Leon S. Forman, Jason E. Dymbort, Leon S. Forman, Legal Oral History Project, University Of Pennsylvania Carey Law School

Legal Oral History Project

For transcript, click the Download button above. For video index, click the link below.

Leon S. Forman ((L'39) was an authority on bankruptcy and creditors' rights. He practiced law for more than sixty years and served as chairman of the Philadelphia Bar Association's corporation, banking and business law section, and as chairman of the Pennsylvania Bar Association's bankruptcy committee. He was a member of the American Law Institute. He taught bankruptcy and creditors' rights at the Law School of the University of Pennsylvania and at Temple University School of Law. He died in 2006.


Culture Of Quiescence, Carl Bogus Apr 2004

Culture Of Quiescence, Carl Bogus

Law Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Client Counseling, Mediation, And Alternative Narratives Of Dispute Resolution, Robert Rubinson Apr 2004

Client Counseling, Mediation, And Alternative Narratives Of Dispute Resolution, Robert Rubinson

All Faculty Scholarship

This article examines how litigation and mediation have distinct narrative structures and what these narratives say about counseling clients about mediation. In the narrative of litigation, parties struggle against one another in order to convince a decision maker of the truth of "what happened." This struggle is about more than designating liability; it is about enabling the decision-maker to restore social order and vindicate morality. In contrast, the narrative of mediation does not call upon the mediator to designate "truth" or "right" and "wrong." Rather, the mediator acts to enable parties to overcome and transform conflict through collaboration. In the ...


Lawyers, Gats, And The Wto Accountancy Disciplines: The History Of The Wto's Consultation, The Iba Gats Forum And The September 2003 Iba Resolutions, Laurel S. Terry Apr 2004

Lawyers, Gats, And The Wto Accountancy Disciplines: The History Of The Wto's Consultation, The Iba Gats Forum And The September 2003 Iba Resolutions, Laurel S. Terry

Faculty Scholarly Works

The article addresses issues related to legal services and the General Agreement on Trade in Services or GATS. The article begins by focusing on "Track #2" of the GATS and the obligation under GATS Article VI:4 to develop "any necessary disciplines." In 1998, WTO Members implemented GATS Article VI:4 by adopting "Disciplines" that apply to the accoutnancy sector. WTO Members currently are in the process of deciding whether to extend the WTO Accountancy Disciplines, S/L/64, to other service sectors, including legal services. In December 2002, the WTO sent the International Bar Association (IBA) and other non-governmental ...


Legal Malpractice Insurance: Surviving The Perfect Storm, Susan Saab Fortney Apr 2004

Legal Malpractice Insurance: Surviving The Perfect Storm, Susan Saab Fortney

Faculty Scholarship

This article serves as a practical guide to legal malpractice insurance. Part I introduces the topic of legal malpractice insurance with a brief overview of the changes that occurred in market conditions in 2000 and the subsequent effect on insurance premiums and coverage. Part II outlines the different types of insurance coverage that are available to legal professionals by describing common policy terms, exclusions, and conditions that affect coverage. Part III describes changes in law firms that may affect coverage. Part IV provides legal professionals with useful advice to consider when choosing an insurance policy. Part V reveals important factors ...


Interview With Michael Levy, Christina Fahmy, Michael Levy, Legal Oral History Project, University Of Pennsylvania Carey Law School Mar 2004

Interview With Michael Levy, Christina Fahmy, Michael Levy, Legal Oral History Project, University Of Pennsylvania Carey Law School

Legal Oral History Project

For transcript, click the Download button above

Michael Levy (L '69) is the Chief of Computer Crimes at the United States Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. He has served in the U.S. Department of Justice since 1980 with two one-year excursions into private practice. Before joining the U.S. Attorney’s office, Mr. Levy worked as a Public Defender and as an Assistant District Attorney in Philadelphia and as an Assistant Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. He also had his own law practice for four years.


Vol. 2, No. 04/05 (March/April 2004) Mar 2004

Vol. 2, No. 04/05 (March/April 2004)

Indiana Law Update

No abstract provided.


Civil Obedience, W. Bradley Wendel Mar 2004

Civil Obedience, W. Bradley Wendel

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Discussions of legal ethics generally assume that lawyers should deliberate straightforwardly on the basis of reasons to act or refrain from acting. This model of deliberation fails to account for the role of the law in resolving normative disagreement and coordinating social activity by people who do not share comprehensive ethical doctrines. The law represents a collective decision about what citizens ought to do, which replaces the reasons individuals would otherwise have to act. This Article contends that legal ethics ought to be understood as an aspect of this theory of the authority of law. On this account, lawyers have ...


Zeal By All Means, But Only Within The Rules, Paul R. Tremblay, J. Charles Mokriski Mar 2004

Zeal By All Means, But Only Within The Rules, Paul R. Tremblay, J. Charles Mokriski

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

No abstract provided.


The Rule Of Law In The Reform Of Legal Education: Teaching The Legal Mind In Japanese Law Schools, James Maxeiner Mar 2004

The Rule Of Law In The Reform Of Legal Education: Teaching The Legal Mind In Japanese Law Schools, James Maxeiner

All Faculty Scholarship

  • a. The Rule of Law is at the heart of the present legal reform.
  • b. There is an international consensus about basic elements of the Rule of Law.
  • c. Legal methods are central to the Rule of Law. But different legal methods are used to realize the Rule of Law.
  • d. Teaching legal methods, i.e., teaching to think like a lawyer, is at the heart of that which is professional in legal education.
  • e. The present legal reform invites Japanese law schools to teach legal methods.


Enough: The Failure Of The Living Will, Angela Fagerlin, Carl E. Schneider Mar 2004

Enough: The Failure Of The Living Will, Angela Fagerlin, Carl E. Schneider

Articles

Enough. The living will has failed, and it is time to say so. We should have known it would fail: A notable but neglected psychological literature always provided arresting reasons to expect the policy of living wills to misfire. Given their alluring potential, perhaps they were worth trying. But a crescendoing empirical literature and persistent clinical disappointments reveal that the rewards of the campaign to promote living wills do not justify its costs. Nor can any degree of tinkering ever make the living will an effective instrument of social policy. As the evidence of failure has mounted, living wills have ...


Attorney Fees In Class Action Settlements: An Empirical Study, Theodore Eisenberg, Geoffrey P. Miller Mar 2004

Attorney Fees In Class Action Settlements: An Empirical Study, Theodore Eisenberg, Geoffrey P. Miller

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Study of two comprehensive class action case data sets covering 1993-2002 shows that the amount of client recovery is overwhelmingly the most important determinant of the attorney fee award. Even in cases in which the courts engage in the lodestar calculation (the product of reasonable hours and a reasonable hourly rate), the client's recovery generally explains the pattern of awards better than the lodestar. Thus, the time and expense of a lodestar calculation may be wasteful. We also find no robust evidence that either recoveries for plaintiffs or fees of their attorneys increased overtime. The mean fee award in ...