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Corporation Law After Enron: The Possibility Of A Capitalist Reimagination, David A. Westbrook Nov 2003

Corporation Law After Enron: The Possibility Of A Capitalist Reimagination, David A. Westbrook

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


State Constitutional Rights As Resistance To National Power: Toward A Functional Theory Of State Constitutions, James A. Gardner Jun 2003

State Constitutional Rights As Resistance To National Power: Toward A Functional Theory Of State Constitutions, James A. Gardner

Journal Articles

In the American legal order, constitutional rights are conventionally understood to apply to and restrain the level of government created by the constitution in which those rights appear. Thus, individual rights in a lower-order constitution are understood to apply solely to the lower level government and to have no relevance to the actions of any higher level of government. This article challenges the conventional understanding by arguing that individual rights appearing in state constitutions can in many circumstances play a meaningful role in restraining the exercise of national power. Specifically, the identification and enforcement of state constitutional rights can serve ...


Just Do It!: Title Ix As A Threat To University Autonomy, Richard A. Epstein May 2003

Just Do It!: Title Ix As A Threat To University Autonomy, Richard A. Epstein

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Creating An Information Commons, James G. Milles May 2003

Creating An Information Commons, James G. Milles

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Pierre Schlag And The Temple Of Boredom, David A. Westbrook Apr 2003

Pierre Schlag And The Temple Of Boredom, David A. Westbrook

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


But Pierre, If We Can't Think Normatively, What Are We To Do?, John Henry Schlegel Apr 2003

But Pierre, If We Can't Think Normatively, What Are We To Do?, John Henry Schlegel

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


The Need For A Revitalized Common Law Of The Workplace, William R. Corbett Jan 2003

The Need For A Revitalized Common Law Of The Workplace, William R. Corbett

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Reenchanting International Law, Mark C. Modak-Truran Jan 2003

Reenchanting International Law, Mark C. Modak-Truran

Journal Articles

I will argue that international law needs religion because it is indeterminate and that international law should not attempt to resolve legal indeterminancy because this would require establishing an official international religion. Given the limitations of this article, however, I will not attempt to provide a comprehensive normative and descriptive account of law and international law to support this claim." My more modest expectations are to provide a normative theory of law to justify the interpretation of international law in cases in which international law is indeterminate.


On Teaching Constitutional Law When My Race Is In Their Face, Angela Mae Kupenda Jan 2003

On Teaching Constitutional Law When My Race Is In Their Face, Angela Mae Kupenda

Journal Articles

Constitutional Law is one of my favorite subjects to teach. You see, I am a 45-year-old southern-born, black woman who not only studies constitutional law, I lived it. I attended separate and unequal schools, survived freedom of choice programs, suffered Jim Crow laws, and was a beneficiary of consent decrees and affirmative action programs. I love discussing and debating issues relating to race, gender, etc. I love constitutional law, but many of my students do not love the subject or, perhaps, care for hearing about my related experiences.


Diversity: Do You Really Want It?, Angela Mae Kupenda Jan 2003

Diversity: Do You Really Want It?, Angela Mae Kupenda

Journal Articles

Diversity. Do you really want it? In many of the diversity workshops I have attended, the facilitators assume that the answer is yes and set out to help the educational institution acquire more diversity. But given continuing fears and prejudices in our society, this is a mistaken, and perhaps premature assumption. Yet, when you are asked, as an educator or administrator, whether you want students of different races and colors, from varying socio-economic backgrounds, and with different perspectives, your response may be that "wanting" is irrelevant. You "need" diversity given our country's changing demographics, your institution's need to ...


The Public-Use Question As A Takings Problem, Nicole Stelle Garnett Jan 2003

The Public-Use Question As A Takings Problem, Nicole Stelle Garnett

Journal Articles

Government officials regularly use the power of eminent domain to benefit private entities, and just as regularly justify their actions with post hoc assertions about the need to promote economic development. In Hawaii Housing Authority v. Midkiff, the Supreme Court reaffirmed that the Fifth Amendment demands broad deference to a government's decision to exercise the power of eminent domain. Midkiff makes clear that public use challenges are subject to rational basis review; so long as a taking can be justified by some conceivable public purpose, it will be upheld. Yet in recent years, a number of courts have put ...


To Kill Or Capture Suspects In The Global War On Terror, Mary Ellen O'Connell Jan 2003

To Kill Or Capture Suspects In The Global War On Terror, Mary Ellen O'Connell

Journal Articles

Presents a speech by law professor Mary Ellen O'Connell, delivered at the Case Western Reserve School of Law's War Crimes Research Symposium, February 28, 2003. Legal implications of pursuing terror suspects using military action by the U.S. government; Components of armed conflict; Analysis of the United States' involvement in the internal armed conflict in the Philippines.


Comment: Dna As Property: Implications On The Constitutionality Of Dna Dragnets, Jonathan Will Jan 2003

Comment: Dna As Property: Implications On The Constitutionality Of Dna Dragnets, Jonathan Will

Journal Articles

This comment will argue that when the state seeks to deprive a person of his or her DNA, greater constitutional protections than are currently afforded dragnets must be provided. Part I will discuss the unique properties of DNA, the information contained therein and why it should be constitutionally protected. Part II will briefly trace the history of DNA dragnets, including the practical and procedural uses in worldwide criminal investigations. Part III will explore current law and commentary regarding Fourth Amendment privacy interests in one’s DNA. Part IV will argue that DNA constitutes personal property, and finally, Part V will ...


License To Harass Women: Requiring Hostile Environment Sexual Harassment To Be “Severe Or Pervasive” Discriminates Among “Terms And Conditions Of Employment, Judith J. Johnson Jan 2003

License To Harass Women: Requiring Hostile Environment Sexual Harassment To Be “Severe Or Pervasive” Discriminates Among “Terms And Conditions Of Employment, Judith J. Johnson

Journal Articles

Title VII was intended to remedy discrimination; thus, it is ironic that the courts themselves discriminate among "terms and conditions of employment" by treating hostile environment discrimination less favorably, most commonly in sexual harassment cases. As the Supreme Court said in its first sexual harassment case, hostile environment harassment must be "severe or pervasive" to be actionable. However, many lower courts have used this language to excuse harassment against women. This Article suggests that the problem originates in the Court's continued use of the phrase "severe or pervasive" to describe actionable conduct. This rather dramatic terminology in fact overstates ...


Symposium Introduction: Law, Religion, And Human Rights In Global Perspective, Mark C. Modak-Truran Jan 2003

Symposium Introduction: Law, Religion, And Human Rights In Global Perspective, Mark C. Modak-Truran

Journal Articles

The essays and articles in this Symposium highlight the importance of religion for properly understanding the nature of law, feminism, globalization, human rights, international legal history, and judicial decision making. These essays and articles also challenge the academy to accept a more sophisticated understanding of religion and to understand its importance for all academic inquiry.


Book Review, Mark C. Modak-Truran Jan 2003

Book Review, Mark C. Modak-Truran

Journal Articles

While Bauman provides persuasive rebuttals to many of the CLS criticisms of liberalism, contemporary liberalism suffers from some of the same shortcomings Bauman observes about CLS. For example, Bauman criticizes CLS for not having a conceptual foundation (an external standard of truth) to demystify the liberal legal consciousness claimed to be inherent in the law. Bauman also argues that contemporary liberal theorists, like John Rawls, avoid the “comprehensive metaphysical or ontological framework” (p.30), held to be incoherent by CLS. However, Bauman fails to realize that Rawls similarly lacks a conceptual foundation to justify his “political not metaphysical” form of ...


"They Are Our Brothers, And Christ Gave His Life For Them": The Catholic Tradition And The Idea Of Human Rights In Latin America, Paolo G. Carozza Jan 2003

"They Are Our Brothers, And Christ Gave His Life For Them": The Catholic Tradition And The Idea Of Human Rights In Latin America, Paolo G. Carozza

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


The Biblical Prophets As Lawyers For The Poor, Thomas L. Shaffer Jan 2003

The Biblical Prophets As Lawyers For The Poor, Thomas L. Shaffer

Journal Articles

Lawyers practicing poverty law often lack mentors and role models. This author discusses how biblical figures, who served poor people, could be mentors and role models for lawyers practicing poverty law. Prophets, and particularly prophets-as-lawyers, redefine power relationships. Shaffer discusses his personal journey through out his career in using religious guidance to help him better understand his career. He also discuss his teachings to his law students of the value of learning from prophets in their legal careers.


Musical Courts: Plaintiff Picks A Court But Can Defendant Trump The Choice? An Analysis Of Breuer V. Jim's Concrete Of Brevard, Inc., Barbara J. Fick Jan 2003

Musical Courts: Plaintiff Picks A Court But Can Defendant Trump The Choice? An Analysis Of Breuer V. Jim's Concrete Of Brevard, Inc., Barbara J. Fick

Journal Articles

This article previews the Supreme Court case Brewer v. Jim's Concrete of Brevard, 538 U.S. 691 (2003). The author expected the Court to address the issue of whether the language of the Fair Labor Standards Act providing that "an action . . . may be maintained in any federal or state court" constitutes an express provision prohibiting removal to federal court when the plaintiff has chosen to maintain its lawsuit in state court.


Lawyers And Biblical Prophets, Thomas L. Shaffer Jan 2003

Lawyers And Biblical Prophets, Thomas L. Shaffer

Journal Articles

This is part of a broader exploration of the suggestion that the biblical prophets-Moses, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Amos, Nathan, and the others-are sources of ethical reflection and moral example for modern American lawyers. The suggestion appears to be unusual; I am not sure why.

The Prophets were, more than anything else, lawyers-as their successors, the Rabbis of the Talmud, were. They were neither teachers nor bureaucrats, not elected officials or priests or preachers. And the comparison is not an ancient curiosity:

Much of what admirable lawyer-heroes have done in modern America has been prophetic in the biblical sense-that is, what they ...


Critical Race Theory In Three Acts: Racial Profiling, Affirmative Action, And The Diversity Visa Lottery, Victor C. Romero Jan 2003

Critical Race Theory In Three Acts: Racial Profiling, Affirmative Action, And The Diversity Visa Lottery, Victor C. Romero

Journal Articles

The usual debates surrounding multiculturalism pit individual rights against group grievances in a variety of contexts including racial profiling, affirmative action, and the diversity visa lottery, often with seemingly contradictory results. Liberals often favor affirmative action but decry both racial profiling and the diversity visa lottery, while many conservatives hold the opposite view. Critical race theory provides a unique alternative to stock liberal and conservative arguments, allowing one to draw meaningful and persuasive distinctions among these seminal issues surrounding law enforcement, education, and immigration policy.


Proxies For Loyalty In Constitutional Immigration Law: Citizenship And Race After September 11, Victor C. Romero Jan 2003

Proxies For Loyalty In Constitutional Immigration Law: Citizenship And Race After September 11, Victor C. Romero

Journal Articles

The purpose of this article is to share some thoughts about using citizenship and race as proxies for loyalty in constitutional immigration discourse within two contexts: one historical and one current. The current context is the profiling of Muslim and Arab immigrants post-September 11, and the historical context is the distinction the Constitution draws between birthright and naturalized citizens in the Presidential Eligibility Clause.


Making Sense Of Successor Liability, Marie T. Reilly Jan 2003

Making Sense Of Successor Liability, Marie T. Reilly

Journal Articles

A firm that buys assets from another firm ordinarily does not acquire liability to the seller's creditors simply by buying its assets. This ordinary rule is subject to important exceptions. The buyer's consent triggers an exception. If a buyer agrees to assume the seller's liability to third parties, it is for that reason liable. This article considers a more controversial exception - successor liability. When a court decides that an asset acquirer should be treated as a "successor" to the transferor, it is liable for the transferor's debts as though it were the transferor.


Right To Write - Free Expression Rights Of Pennsylvania's Creative Students After Columbine, Barbara Brunner Jan 2003

Right To Write - Free Expression Rights Of Pennsylvania's Creative Students After Columbine, Barbara Brunner

Journal Articles

This comment analyzes the current state of students' free speech rights in the context of creative writing assignments and examines potential First Amendment applications to the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA), a statewide, mandatory, standards-based exam administered to Pennsylvania public school students. The PSSA, which currently contains a writing assessment for students in sixth, ninth, and eleventh grades requiring students to write essays in response to prompts, is scored anonymously by private entities under contract with the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Those private subcontractors have "red-flagging" procedures in place to identify essays containing imagery or themes that indicate imminent ...


Proposals To Expel Palestinians From The Occupied Territories As Catalyst For A Civil Adjudication Campaign, Catherine A. Rogers Jan 2003

Proposals To Expel Palestinians From The Occupied Territories As Catalyst For A Civil Adjudication Campaign, Catherine A. Rogers

Journal Articles

I begin in Part II with a brief sketch of the history of stated policies to expel Palestinians from what is now Israel and the Occupied Territories, and then examine recent proposals that have been made and actions that have been taken to implement modern re-articulations of those historic policies. In Part III, I then review the grounds on which international law proscribes mass expulsions of indigenous and occupied peoples. While international law governing this issue is clear in its application and has been overwhelmingly endorsed by the larger international community, international law seems to have little influence on Israel ...


The Exercise Of Contract Freedom In The Making Of Arbitration Agreements, Thomas E. Carbonneau Jan 2003

The Exercise Of Contract Freedom In The Making Of Arbitration Agreements, Thomas E. Carbonneau

Journal Articles

A universal principle of contemporary arbitration law is that contract plays a vital role in the governance of arbitration. The vitality of that role can vary by legal system, court,statute, or treaty. Nonetheless, party agreement often provides the most significant rules for regulating arbitrations and conducting arbitral proceedings. This is especially true in international commercial arbitration. There, the lack of a functional transborder legislativeand adjudicatory process made contract the principal source of law for internationalcommercial transactions and arbitrations. Although law-making is more possible withinindividual national legal systems, the rule of contract freedom is also firmly established inmatters of domestic ...


Dna Identification Databases: Legality, Legitimacy, And The Case For Population-Wide Coverage, David H. Kaye, Michael E. Smith Jan 2003

Dna Identification Databases: Legality, Legitimacy, And The Case For Population-Wide Coverage, David H. Kaye, Michael E. Smith

Journal Articles

Over the past decade, law enforcement authorities have amassed huge collections of DNA samples and the identifying profiles derived from them. Large DNA databanks routinely help to identify the guilty and to exonerate the innocent, but as the databanks grow, so do fears about civil liberties. Perhaps the most controversial policy issue in the creation of these databases is the question of coverage: Whose DNA profiles should be stored in them? The possibilities extend from convicted violent sex offenders to all convicted felons, to everyone arrested, to the entire population. This Article questions the rationales for drawing the line at ...


The Case For Tax Sparing Along With Expanding And Limiting The Subpart F Regime, Samuel C. Thompson Jr. Jan 2003

The Case For Tax Sparing Along With Expanding And Limiting The Subpart F Regime, Samuel C. Thompson Jr.

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


The Child Citizenship Act And The Family Reunification Act: Valuing The Citizen Child As Well As The Citizen Parent, Victor C. Romero Jan 2003

The Child Citizenship Act And The Family Reunification Act: Valuing The Citizen Child As Well As The Citizen Parent, Victor C. Romero

Journal Articles

Leading civil rights advocates today lament the degree to which current immigration law fails to maintain family unity. The recent passage of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000 is a rare bipartisan step in the right direction because it grants automatic citizenship to foreign-born children of U.S. citizens upon receipt of their permanent resident status and finalization of their adoption. Congress now has before it the Family Reunification Act of 2001, which aims to restore certain procedural safeguards relaxed in 1996 to ensure that foreign-born parents are not summarily separated from their children, many of whom may be U ...


Decoupling 'Terrorist' From 'Immigrant': An Enhanced Role For The Federal Courts Post 9/11, Victor C. Romero Jan 2003

Decoupling 'Terrorist' From 'Immigrant': An Enhanced Role For The Federal Courts Post 9/11, Victor C. Romero

Journal Articles

Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Attorney General John Ashcroft has utilized the broad immigration power ceded to him by Congress to ferret out terrorists among noncitizens detained for minor immigration violations. Such a strategy provides the government two options: deport those who are not terrorists, and then prosecute others who are. While certainly efficient, using immigration courts and their less formal due process protections afforded noncitizens should trigger greater oversight and vigilance by the federal courts for at least four reasons: First, while the legitimate goal of immigration law enforcement is deportation, Ashcroft's true objective in ...