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Series

2003

Georgetown University Law Center

Constitutional law

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Rex E. Lee Conference On The Office Of The Solicitor General Of The United States: Panel For Former Solicitors General, Seth P. Waxman, Walter E. Dellinger Iii, Kenneth W. Starr, Charles Fried, Drew S. Days Iii Jan 2003

Rex E. Lee Conference On The Office Of The Solicitor General Of The United States: Panel For Former Solicitors General, Seth P. Waxman, Walter E. Dellinger Iii, Kenneth W. Starr, Charles Fried, Drew S. Days Iii

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

I agree entirely that the chain of command is clear and that the Framers managed to make it all the way through all the articles of the Constitution without even conceiving of a solicitor general, let alone bothering to mention an attorney general. It is important nonetheless to distinguish between those things the solicitor general does pursuant to the longstanding notice-and-comment regulation, and the other things a solicitor general may do pursuant to his (and, someday, her!) statutory obligation to be of general assistance to the attorney general.


Constitutional Legitimacy, Randy E. Barnett Jan 2003

Constitutional Legitimacy, Randy E. Barnett

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The problem of constitutional legitimacy is to establish why anyone should obey the command of a constitutionally-valid law. A lawmaking system is legitimate if there is a prima facie duty to obey the laws it makes. Neither "consent of the governed" nor "benefits received" justifies obedience. Rather, a prima facie duty of obedience exists either (a) if there is actual unanimous consent to the jurisdiction of the lawmaker or, in the absence of consent, (b) f laws are made by procedures which assure that they are not unjust. In the absence of unanimous consent, a written constitution should be assessed ...


Are Foreign Nationals Entitled To The Same Constitutional Rights As Citizens?, David Cole Jan 2003

Are Foreign Nationals Entitled To The Same Constitutional Rights As Citizens?, David Cole

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Are foreign nationals entitled only to reduced rights and freedoms? The difficulty of the question is reflected in the deeply ambivalent approach of the Supreme Court, an ambivalence matched only by the alternately xenophobic and xenophilic attitude of the American public toward immigrants. On the one hand, the Court has insisted for more than a century that foreign nationals living among us are "persons" within the meaning of the Constitution, and are protected by those rights that the Constitution does not expressly reserve to citizens. Because the Constitution expressly limits to citizens only the rights to vote and to run ...