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Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Growing Importance Of Advance Medical Directives In The Military, Thaddeus A. Hoffmeister Oct 2003

The Growing Importance Of Advance Medical Directives In The Military, Thaddeus A. Hoffmeister

School of Law Faculty Publications

While the litigation in the Terri Schiavo case is an extreme example of what can go wrong in the health care decision-making process, it highlights the importance of advance medical directives (AMD) in helping to ensure patient autonomy during end-of-life medical treatment. Unfortunately, large segments of society, to include the military, are still unclear about the role of AMDs in patient care. Thus, this article provides a broad overview of AMDs and their legal applications with a particular emphasis on expanding their use in the military community. This article begins with a discussion of living wills and durable powers of ...


Life And Death Decision-Making: Judges V. Legislators As Sources Of Law In Bioethics, Charles H. Baron Jul 2003

Life And Death Decision-Making: Judges V. Legislators As Sources Of Law In Bioethics, Charles H. Baron

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In some situations, courts may be better sources of new law than legislatures. Some support for this proposition is provided by the performance of American courts in the development of law regarding the “right to die.” When confronted with the problems presented by mid-Twentieth Century technological advances in prolonging human life, American legislators were slow to act. It was the state common law courts, beginning with Quinlan in 1976, that took primary responsibility for gradually crafting new legal principles that excepted withdrawal of life-prolonging treatment from the application of general laws dealing with homicide and suicide. These courts, like the ...


The Legal And Political Future Of Physician-Assisted Suicide, Larry Palmer May 2003

The Legal And Political Future Of Physician-Assisted Suicide, Larry Palmer

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Physician Liability And Managed Care: A Philosophical Perspective, Dionne L. Koller Apr 2003

Physician Liability And Managed Care: A Philosophical Perspective, Dionne L. Koller

All Faculty Scholarship

Despite the emergence of managed health care and the resulting dramatic change in the role of the third-party payer in the physician-patient relationship, the liability standards applied to physicians largely have remained unchanged. This has created a tension between physicians' legal and ethical obligations, and the requirements imposed on the physician by managed health care. Specifically, the issue confronts the physician in the context of malpractice liability. Managed Care Organizations impose a significant amount of control over the way physicians practice medicine, often forcing physicians to ration care. Notwithstanding any beneficial cost savings that might result, this approach subjects the ...


Procedural Provisions In Nevada Medical Malpractice Reform, Carl W. Tobias Jan 2003

Procedural Provisions In Nevada Medical Malpractice Reform, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

In late July 2002, a special session of the Nevada Legislature passed medical malpractice reform legislation. The expressly-stated purpose of this statute is remedying, or at least ameliorating, the "serious threat to the health, welfare and safety of [Nevada] residents" which is posed by the state's "extreme difficulties attracting and maintaining a sufficient network of physicians to meet [residents'] needs." Moreover, the measure emphasizes substantive reforms that are primarily intended to limit the potential liability of certain health care providers for negligent actions. However, the legislation encompasses numerous "procedural" provisions, which may be equally important as the substantive reforms ...


A Healer Or An Executioner: The Proper Role Of A Psychiatrist In A Criminal Justice System, Gregory Dolin Jan 2003

A Healer Or An Executioner: The Proper Role Of A Psychiatrist In A Criminal Justice System, Gregory Dolin

All Faculty Scholarship

This article argues that despite the benefits of ridding the criminal justice system of some uncertainty and ignorance with respect to mental health issues, the very close involvement of psychiatrists in the criminal justice system as practiced in the United States is not only illogical and bad policy, but also unethical from the viewpoint of medical ethics. Part II of this article will lay the groundwork for the argument by discussing the history of the insanity defense, and of science's involvement with criminal justice; while Part III, will look into the association of science and the administration of justice ...


Discussed In Federico Stella, Criminal Omissions, Causality, Probability, Counterfactuals: Medical-Surgical Activity, Richard W. Wright Jan 2003

Discussed In Federico Stella, Criminal Omissions, Causality, Probability, Counterfactuals: Medical-Surgical Activity, Richard W. Wright

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Genetic Health And Eugenics Precedents: A Voice Of Caution, Larry Palmer Jan 2003

Genetic Health And Eugenics Precedents: A Voice Of Caution, Larry Palmer

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Resisting Medicine/Remodeling Gender, Dean Spade Jan 2003

Resisting Medicine/Remodeling Gender, Dean Spade

Faculty Scholarship

In this article, Dean Spade explores the problematic role of medicine in pushing for trans rights. Spade uses a combination of personal narrative of his own interaction with the healthcare system and his experience with legal advocacy on behalf of transgender and gender nonconforming clients. He reveals how the medicalization of trans identity, by categorizing it as a mental health disorder called Gender Identity Disorder, serves to reaffirm that everyone should either be male or female. Spade further asserts this medicalization can be problematic when advocating for the legal rights of gender nonconforming individuals. For example, he points out that ...


Infected Judgment: Legal Responses To Physician Bias, Mary Crossley Jan 2003

Infected Judgment: Legal Responses To Physician Bias, Mary Crossley

Articles

Substantial evidence indicates that clinically irrelevant patient characteristics, including race and gender, may at times influence a physician's choice of treatment. Less clear, however, is whether a patient who is the victim of a biased medical decision has any effective legal recourse. Heedful of the difficulties of designing research to establish conclusively the role of physician bias, this article surveys published evidence suggesting the operation of physician bias in clinical decision making. The article then examines potential legal responses to biased medical judgments. A patient who is the subject of a biased decision may sue her doctor for violating ...


Midwifery: Strategies On The Road To Universal Legalization, Laura Hermer Jan 2003

Midwifery: Strategies On The Road To Universal Legalization, Laura Hermer

Faculty Scholarship

Multiple studies have shown that direct-entry midwifery is just as safe, if not safer than, medical care in low-risk childbirth. Most births using direct-entry midwives require fewer interventions than those attended by physicians, yet yield excellent results. The results of these studies indicate that we should return to midwifery for normal births, rather than continuing to rely primarily on medicine. This option, however, has been significantly curtailed by many state legislatures and courts, despite decades of attempts to make incursions on the traditional paradigm of hospital births attended by obstetricians. As a result, where midwifery is more readily available, it ...


That Wonderful Year: Smallpox, Genetic Engineering, And Bio-Terrorism, David A. Koplow Jan 2003

That Wonderful Year: Smallpox, Genetic Engineering, And Bio-Terrorism, David A. Koplow

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The thesis of this Article is that the United States, Russia, and by extension, the world as a whole, are pursuing a fundamentally sound strategy in retaining, rather than destroying, the last known remaining samples of the variola virus. For now, those samples are housed in secure, deep-freeze storage at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia and at the comparable Russian facility, known as Vector, near Novosibirsk, Siberia. But that basic decision is about the only correct move we are making at this time - and even it is animated by fundamental misapprehensions about ...