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Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Law

Current Developments In Cyberspace, Eric Easton Apr 2001

Current Developments In Cyberspace, Eric Easton

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Restricting Hate Speech Against Private Figures: Lessons In Power-Based Censorship From Defamation Law, Victor C. Romero Jan 2001

Restricting Hate Speech Against Private Figures: Lessons In Power-Based Censorship From Defamation Law, Victor C. Romero

Journal Articles

This article examines the debate between those who favor greater protection for minorities vulnerable to hate speech and First Amendment absolutists who are skeptical of any burdens on pure speech. The author also provides another perspective on the debate by highlighting the "public/private figure" distinction as an area within First Amendment law that acknowledges differences in power, a construct anti-hate speech advocates should use to further their cause. Specifically, the author places the "public/private figure" division in a theoretical and historical context and then provides empirical support for the thesis that whites enjoy a more prominent societal role ...


A Roundtable Discussion With Lawrence Lessig, David G. Post & Jeffrey Rosen, Thomas E. Baker Jan 2001

A Roundtable Discussion With Lawrence Lessig, David G. Post & Jeffrey Rosen, Thomas E. Baker

Faculty Publications

This article is a transcript of a discussion between Lawrence Lessig, David G. Post and Jeffrey Rosen on a variety of issues surrounding law, technology and the Internet. The moderator was Thomas E. Baker and the discussion was part of a Drake University Law School symposium in February of 2001.


Yahoo And Democracy On The Internet, Joel R. Reidenberg Jan 2001

Yahoo And Democracy On The Internet, Joel R. Reidenberg

Faculty Scholarship

This article examines the French court order requiring Yahoo to prevent French Internet users from accessing images of Nazi memorabilia available for auction on the company's American web site. The article uses the French case to challenge the popular belief that an entirely borderless Internet favors democratic values. The article starts from the premise that while the Internet enables actors to reach a geographically dispersed audience, the Internet should not change the accountability of those actors for their conduct within national borders. The article shows that Yahoo's extensive business in France justifies the application of France's democratically ...


E-Commerce And Trans-Atlantic Privacy, Joel R. Reidenberg Jan 2001

E-Commerce And Trans-Atlantic Privacy, Joel R. Reidenberg

Faculty Scholarship

For almost a decade, the United States and Europe have anticipated a clash over the protection of personal information. Between the implementation in Europe of comprehensive legal protections pursuant to the directive on data protection and the continued reliance on industry self-regulation in the United States, trans-Atlantic privacy policies have been at odds with each other. The rapid growth in e-commerce is now sparking the long-anticipated trans-Atlantic privacy clash. This Article will first look at the context of American e-commerce and the disjuncture between citizens' privacy and business practices. The Article will then turn to the international context and explore ...


On-Line Tutorial Project: Intellectual Property In E-Commerce, William J. Murphy Jan 2001

On-Line Tutorial Project: Intellectual Property In E-Commerce, William J. Murphy

Law Faculty Scholarship

Copyrights, Trademarks and Patents make up most of the area of law known as Intellectual Property. Intellectual Property's importance in Electronic Commerce is difficult to overstate. The Internet has been defined as a global network of networks through which computers communicate by sending information in packets, and each network consists of computers connected by cables or wireless links. It is the Intellectual Property laws of Copyright, Trademark and Patents that are attempting to harmonize the effects that E-Commerce and the Internet have had on the individual's ability to access and use this information. It should be remembered that ...


A Symposium Précis, Thomas E. Baker Jan 2001

A Symposium Précis, Thomas E. Baker

Faculty Publications

This article is an introduction to and overview of the Drake University Law School symposium The Constitution and the Internet, held in February of 2001. It highlights important issues including the Constitution and the Internet, civil liberty and the application of a 200 year old document to the modern age of rapidly changing technology.


Taking Globalization Seriously: Towards General Jurisprudence (Book Review Of Globalization And Legal Theory By William Twining), Doron M. Kalir Jan 2001

Taking Globalization Seriously: Towards General Jurisprudence (Book Review Of Globalization And Legal Theory By William Twining), Doron M. Kalir

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Part II provides an account of the jurisprudence of Globalization and Legal Theory. Due to the novelty of many of the issues discussed in the book, as well as their importance to the understanding of Twining's recommendations, I have provided a longer than usual account of several chapters. Part II touches upon one of the central jurisprudential dichotomies introduced by Twining—the distinction between general and particular jurisprudence. Twining compares different accounts of the distinction using pairs of canonical jurists. In particular, he compares H.L.A Hart's Postscript with Dworkin's Law's Empire. In this part ...


Introduction: From Sheet Music To Mp3 Files—A Brief Perspective On Napster, Harold R. Weinberg Jan 2001

Introduction: From Sheet Music To Mp3 Files—A Brief Perspective On Napster, Harold R. Weinberg

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

The Napster case is the current cause celebre of the digital age. The story has color. It involves music-sharing technology invented by an eighteen-year-old college dropout whose high school classmates nicknamed him "The Napster" on account of his perpetually kinky hair. The story has drama. Depending on your perspective, it pits rapacious big music companies against poor and hardworking students who just want to enjoy some tunes; or it pits creative and industrious music companies seeking a fair return on their invested effort, time, and money against greedy and irreverent music thieves. And the case has importance. Music maybe intellectual ...


Securities Fraud In Cyberspace: Reaching The Outer Limits Of The Federal Securities Laws, Constance Z. Wagner Jan 2001

Securities Fraud In Cyberspace: Reaching The Outer Limits Of The Federal Securities Laws, Constance Z. Wagner

All Faculty Scholarship

This article discusses the increasing use of the Internet for securities transactions, the growth of securitiesfraud perpetrated through that medium and the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) enforcement program initiated to combat it. The author critiques the position taken by the SEC that the existing anti-fraudprovisions of the federal securities laws can be stretched to cover Internet fraud. Using an enforcement action brought by the SEC against an online stock trading guru named Tokyo Joe as an example of the confused jurisprudence that results when pre-cyberspace law is applied to securities fraud in cyberspace, the author proposes a different regulatory ...


Privacy And Power: Computer Databases And Metaphors For Information Privacy, Daniel J. Solove Jan 2001

Privacy And Power: Computer Databases And Metaphors For Information Privacy, Daniel J. Solove

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

Journalists, politicians, jurists, and legal academics often describe the privacy problem created by the collection and use of personal information through computer databases and the Internet with the metaphor of Big Brother - the totalitarian government portrayed in George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four. Professor Solove argues that this is the wrong metaphor. The Big Brother metaphor as well as much of the law that protects privacy emerges from a longstanding paradigm for conceptualizing privacy problems. Under this paradigm, privacy is invaded by uncovering one's hidden world, by surveillance, and by the disclosure of concealed information. The harm caused by such ...


Researching International Environmental Law, Ronald E. Wheeler Jan 2001

Researching International Environmental Law, Ronald E. Wheeler

Faculty Scholarship

Question: I would like to use the Internet to research issues involving international law, specifically international environmental law. How can I access relevant information quickly if I have very little information to begin with?