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Full-Text Articles in Law

The American Criminal Jury, Nancy J. King Jan 1999

The American Criminal Jury, Nancy J. King

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

As juries become both less common and more expensive, some have questioned the wisdom of preserving the criminal jury in its present form. The benefits of the jury are difficult to quantify, but jury verdicts continue to earn widespread acceptance by the public and trial by jury remains a cherished right of most Americans. In any event, many basic features of the criminal jury in the United States cannot be modified without either constitutional amendment or radical reinterpretations of the Bill of Rights. Judges and legislators continue to tinker within constitutional confines, some hoping to improve the jury trial by ...


Victims' Rights, Rule Of Law, And The Threat To Liberal Jurisprudence, Ahmed A. White Jan 1999

Victims' Rights, Rule Of Law, And The Threat To Liberal Jurisprudence, Ahmed A. White

Articles

No abstract provided.


When Justice Fails: Indemnification For Unjust Conviction, Adele Bernhard Jan 1999

When Justice Fails: Indemnification For Unjust Conviction, Adele Bernhard

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Revisiting Victim's Rights, Lynne Henderson Jan 1999

Revisiting Victim's Rights, Lynne Henderson

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Professor Steele’S Opus, Gerald S. Reamey Jan 1999

Professor Steele’S Opus, Gerald S. Reamey

Faculty Articles

Walter Steele is a consummate teacher precisely because he always is teaching. To observe him, to converse with him, to listen to him, to read him, is to learn something. He would not talk about ethical behavior in the classroom, only to cut corners in his private life. He would not demand razor-sharp logic from his students, and then allow himself to be sloppy in his own thinking.

Over the years, the word former students seem to use most often to describe Professor Steele is “intimidating.” He is intimidating because of his power; not the power some law professors wield ...