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Series

1999

Litigation

Institution
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Articles 1 - 30 of 44

Full-Text Articles in Law

Constitutional Law -- Due Process Clause -- Third Circuit Holds That $50 Million Punitive Damages Award In Context Of A $48 Million Compensatory Award Is Unconstitutionally Excessive -- Inter Medical Supplies, Ltd. V. Ebi Medical Systems, Inc., 181 F.3d 446 (3d Cir. 1999)., A. Benjamin Spencer Dec 1999

Constitutional Law -- Due Process Clause -- Third Circuit Holds That $50 Million Punitive Damages Award In Context Of A $48 Million Compensatory Award Is Unconstitutionally Excessive -- Inter Medical Supplies, Ltd. V. Ebi Medical Systems, Inc., 181 F.3d 446 (3d Cir. 1999)., A. Benjamin Spencer

Faculty Publications

In 1996, the Supreme Court, in BMW of North America, Inc. v. Gore, struck down a punitive damages award on the ground that it was "grossly excessive" in violation of the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment . Since BMW, many courts have faced the challenge of applying its principles to determine whether punitive damages awards surpass the constitutional limit. Last June, in Inter Medical Supplies, Ltd. v. EBI Medical Systems, Inc., the Third Circuit faced this difficulty when it considered whether a $50 million punitive damages award, granted in conjunction with a $48 million compensatory damages award, was excessive ...


A Defense Of Analogical Reasoning In Law, Emily Sherwin Oct 1999

A Defense Of Analogical Reasoning In Law, Emily Sherwin

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

This Article defends the practice of reasoning by analogy on the basis of its epistemic and institutional advantages. The advantages identified for analogical reasoning include that it produces a wealth of data for decisonmaking; it represents the collaborative effort of a number of judges over time; it tends to correct biases that might lead judges to discount the force of prior decisions; and it exerts a conservative force in law, holding the development of law to a gradual pace. Notably, these advantages do not depend on the rational force of analogical reasoning. Rather, the author contends that, as open-ended reasoning ...


How Much Justice Hangs In The Balance? A New Look At Hung Jury Rates, Paula Hannaford-Agor, Valerie P. Hans, G. Thomas Munsterman Oct 1999

How Much Justice Hangs In The Balance? A New Look At Hung Jury Rates, Paula Hannaford-Agor, Valerie P. Hans, G. Thomas Munsterman

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Reports of apparent increases in the number of hung juries in some jurisdictions have caused concern among policy makers. A 1995 report by the California District Attorneys Association cited hung jury rates in 1994 that exceeded 15 percent in some jurisdictions (the rates varied from 3 to 23 percent across the nine counties for which data were available). In 1996, the District of Columbia Superior Court reported a higher-than-expected hung jury rate of 11 percent. Why juries hang at these rates isn't clear, but some commentators have claimed that hung juries are the product of eccentric or nullifying holdout ...


The Rule 11 Studies And Civil Rights Cases: An Inquiry Into The Neutrality Of Procedural Rules, Mark Spiegel Sep 1999

The Rule 11 Studies And Civil Rights Cases: An Inquiry Into The Neutrality Of Procedural Rules, Mark Spiegel

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

This article discusses the controversy regarding neutral procedural rules. It focuses on the claim that the 1983 version of Rule 11 had a disproportionate impact upon civil rights cases, thereby violating the norm of procedural neutrality. By looking at this claim about the impact of Rule 11 on civil rights cases, we can evaluate whether the 1983 version of Rule 11 violated the norm of procedural neutrality, and also understand the different ways that the concept of procedural neutrality is used. This exploration will help us understand the larger debate regarding the neutrality of procedural rules and to make connections ...


Shopping For Judges: An Empirical Analysis Of Venue Choice In Large Chapter 11 Reorganizations, Theodore Eisenberg, Lynn M. Lopucki May 1999

Shopping For Judges: An Empirical Analysis Of Venue Choice In Large Chapter 11 Reorganizations, Theodore Eisenberg, Lynn M. Lopucki

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

For almost two decades, an embarrassing pattern of forum shopping has been developing in the highly visible world of big-case bankruptcy reorganization. Forum shopping--defined here as the act of filing in a court that does not serve the geographical area of the debtor's corporate headquarters--now occurs in more than half of all big-case bankruptcies. Two jurisdictions have attracted most of the forum shoppers. During the 1980s, when a large portion of the shopping was to New York, the lawyers involved asserted that New York was a natural venue because of its role as the country's financial capital and ...


The New Casuistry, Paul R. Tremblay Apr 1999

The New Casuistry, Paul R. Tremblay

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

No abstract provided.


The Bad News About Good Faith For Excess Um Carriers, Robert L. Tucker Mar 1999

The Bad News About Good Faith For Excess Um Carriers, Robert L. Tucker

Akron Law Publications

No abstract provided.


Moot Court Board, 1999-2000, Kellie Casey Monk Jan 1999

Moot Court Board, 1999-2000, Kellie Casey Monk

Materials from All Student Organizations

No abstract provided.


Buckley V. Valeo: A Landmark Of Political Freedom, Joel Gora Jan 1999

Buckley V. Valeo: A Landmark Of Political Freedom, Joel Gora

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Commodities Rulings Appealable To Circuit, Daniel Wise Jan 1999

Commodities Rulings Appealable To Circuit, Daniel Wise

News Articles

No abstract provided.


Shareholder Derivative Litigation And Corporate Governance, Mark J. Loewenstein Jan 1999

Shareholder Derivative Litigation And Corporate Governance, Mark J. Loewenstein

Articles

In approving settlements of derivative actions that include fees for plaintiff's attorney, courts typically announce that attorney's fees are approved if a substantial benefit is obtained. In fact, courts, particularly Delaware courts, approve settlements in shareholder derivative actions that included substantial fees for plaintiff's attorney, despite the absence of a corresponding benefit to the corporation. Frequently, the "benefit" obtained is a reform in corporate governance, which is of dubious value to the corporation. To deter frivolous litigation, courts should resist the temptation to approve these settlements just to dispose of the litigation. The paper concludes that fees ...


Beyond The Hero Judge: Institutional Reform Litigation As Litigation, Margo Schlanger Jan 1999

Beyond The Hero Judge: Institutional Reform Litigation As Litigation, Margo Schlanger

Reviews

In 1955, in its second decision in Brown v. Board of Education, the Supreme Court suggested that federal courts might be called upon to engage in long-term oversight of once-segregated schools. Through the 1960s, southern resistance pushed federal district and appellate judges to turn that possibility into a reality. The impact of this saga on litigation practice extended beyond school desegregation, and even beyond the struggle for African-American equality; through implementation of Brown, the nation’s litigants, lawyers, and judges grew accustomed both to issuance of permanent injunctions against state and local public institutions, and to extended court oversight of ...


Rethinking Statutory Antiwaiver Provisions Following The Lloyd's Of London Litigation, Mark J. Loewenstein Jan 1999

Rethinking Statutory Antiwaiver Provisions Following The Lloyd's Of London Litigation, Mark J. Loewenstein

Articles

In the Lloyd's of London cases, the United States Courts of Appeals upheld certain forum-selection clauses that effectually deprived investors of the protections of the federal securities laws as if the investors had expressly waived those protections. This article examines statutory antiwaiver provisions in light of the Lloyd's cases, exploring the effect those provisions have on the administration of the federal securities laws, and suggests that the law be amended to allow contractual waiver in certain circumstances.


The Effect Of Offer-Of-Settlement Rules On The Terms Of Settlement, Lucian Arye Bebchuk, Howard F. Chang Jan 1999

The Effect Of Offer-Of-Settlement Rules On The Terms Of Settlement, Lucian Arye Bebchuk, Howard F. Chang

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Supreme Court Section 1983 Developments, Martin A. Schwartz Jan 1999

Supreme Court Section 1983 Developments, Martin A. Schwartz

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Supreme Court Section 1983 Developments: October 1998 Term, Martin A. Schwartz Jan 1999

Supreme Court Section 1983 Developments: October 1998 Term, Martin A. Schwartz

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Section 1983 Litigation – Supreme Court Developments, Martin A. Schwartz Jan 1999

Section 1983 Litigation – Supreme Court Developments, Martin A. Schwartz

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Higher Burden For Ada Plaintiffs, Susan J. Becker Jan 1999

Higher Burden For Ada Plaintiffs, Susan J. Becker

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Plaintiffs in Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) cases have a signigicantly higher burden to show a disability due to a triliogy of recent decisions. This article examines this recent case law.


Deposed Parties: Who Has A Right To Access Depositions In Civil Cases?, Robert L. Tucker Jan 1999

Deposed Parties: Who Has A Right To Access Depositions In Civil Cases?, Robert L. Tucker

Akron Law Publications

No abstract provided.


Litigation Against Employment Penalties For Pregnancy, Breastfeeding, And Childcare, Candace Kovacic-Fleischer Jan 1999

Litigation Against Employment Penalties For Pregnancy, Breastfeeding, And Childcare, Candace Kovacic-Fleischer

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

No abstract provided.


Recent Case Developments, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 1999

Recent Case Developments, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

Recent case developments in Insurance law in the year 1998-1999.


Lawyer Disclosure To Prevent Death Or Bodily Injury: A New Look At Spaulding V. Zimmerman, Roger C. Cramton Jan 1999

Lawyer Disclosure To Prevent Death Or Bodily Injury: A New Look At Spaulding V. Zimmerman, Roger C. Cramton

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Panel Discussion Of The Excuse Factory, Stewart J. Schwab Jan 1999

Panel Discussion Of The Excuse Factory, Stewart J. Schwab

Cornell Law Faculty Publications


The Predictability Of Punitive Damages Awards In Published Opinions, The Impact Of Bmw V. Gore On Punitive Damages Awards, And Forecasting Which Punitive Awards Will Be Reduced, Theodore Eisenberg, Martin T. Wells Jan 1999

The Predictability Of Punitive Damages Awards In Published Opinions, The Impact Of Bmw V. Gore On Punitive Damages Awards, And Forecasting Which Punitive Awards Will Be Reduced, Theodore Eisenberg, Martin T. Wells

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

This article assesses the relation between compensatory damages and punitive damages in cases leading to published opinions and BMW v. Gore's impact on the patterns of punitive damages awards in these opinions. We find that punitive damages awards are considerably higher in cases leading to published opinions than in trial level cases. But the correlation between compensatory and punitive awards found in trial level data persists in published opinions and is all but indistinguishable from the correlation in trial level data. We find no significant difference in the pattern of awards before and after BMW and no significant difference ...


The Arizona Jury Reform Permitting Civil Jury Trial Discussions: The View Of Trial Participants, Judges, And Jurors, Valerie P. Hans, Paula Hannaford-Agor, G. Thomas Munsterman Jan 1999

The Arizona Jury Reform Permitting Civil Jury Trial Discussions: The View Of Trial Participants, Judges, And Jurors, Valerie P. Hans, Paula Hannaford-Agor, G. Thomas Munsterman

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

In 1995, the Arizona Supreme Court reformed the jury trial process by allowing civil jurors to discuss the evidence presented during trial prior to their formal deliberations. This Article examines the theoretical, legal, and policy issues raised by this reform and presents the early results of a field experiment that tested the impact of trial discussions. Jurors, judges, attorneys, and litigants in civil jury trials in Arizona were questioned regarding their observations, experiences, and reactions during trial as well as what they perceived to be the benefits and drawback of juror discussions. The data revealed that the majority of judges ...


Evidence: 1997-1998 Survey Of New York Law, Faust Rossi Jan 1999

Evidence: 1997-1998 Survey Of New York Law, Faust Rossi

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Intersection Of Peremptory Challenges, Challenges For Cause, And Harmless Error, William G. Childs Jan 1999

The Intersection Of Peremptory Challenges, Challenges For Cause, And Harmless Error, William G. Childs

Faculty Scholarship

The Author provides a history and overview of peremptory challenges and their relationship with challenges for cause. Part I of the Article outlines the various types of state statutes and state case law related to the mandatory or permissive use of peremptory challenges to correct perceived error in deciding challenges for cause.

Part II includes a discussion of the current law of error analysis in the federal courts and recent trends in that area of law. Part III consists of a review of the Supreme Court case law involving error analysis and peremptory challenges. This Part examines the specific situation ...


Civil Discovery Standards Seek To Improve Pretrial Practice, Susan J. Becker Jan 1999

Civil Discovery Standards Seek To Improve Pretrial Practice, Susan J. Becker

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Challenges faced by attorneys in conducting efficient expert depositions has inspired the Section of Litigation Discovery Task Force to create Civil Discovery Standards. This article reviews these new standards.


A Note On Presumptions With Sequential Litigation, Antonio E. Bernardo, Eric L. Talley Jan 1999

A Note On Presumptions With Sequential Litigation, Antonio E. Bernardo, Eric L. Talley

Faculty Scholarship

This note extends the Bernardo, Talley & Welch (1999) model of legal presumptions to study situations where litigation efforts are spent sequentially rather than simultaneously. The equilibria of the litigation stage are presented as functions of the underlying presumption. The equilibria and comparative statics are shown to be qualitatively similar to those of the simultaneous version. However, sequentiality allows the principal to pre commit to a litigation strategy, and thus possibly preempt any litigation effort whatsoever by the agent.


A Mixed Bag For Chicken Little: Analyzing Year 2000 Claims And Insurance Coverage, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 1999

A Mixed Bag For Chicken Little: Analyzing Year 2000 Claims And Insurance Coverage, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

A visitor from another planet reading the popular and insurance trade press would probably conclude that the world stands on the abyss of a business, tort, and insurance crisis of unprecedented proportion. Media coverage of an impending Year 2000 “crisis” has reached a fevered pitch, with predictions of both a gigantic volume of Year 2000 claims and a correspondingly large amount of insurance coverage litigation. Many predict that the Year 2000 problem (also known as the “Y2K” or “Millennium Bug” problem) will create coverage controversies and costs dwarfing major insurance battles of the late twentieth century such as those concerning ...