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1998

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Articles 1 - 30 of 61

Full-Text Articles in Law

Panel Rejects Ninth Circuit Split, Carl W. Tobias Nov 1998

Panel Rejects Ninth Circuit Split, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Supreme Court 1997 Term -- Foreword: The Limits Of Socratic Deliberation, Michael C. Dorf Nov 1998

The Supreme Court 1997 Term -- Foreword: The Limits Of Socratic Deliberation, Michael C. Dorf

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Of Communists And Anti-Abortion Protestors: The Consequences Of Falling Into The Theoretical Abyss, Christina E. Wells Oct 1998

Of Communists And Anti-Abortion Protestors: The Consequences Of Falling Into The Theoretical Abyss, Christina E. Wells

Faculty Publications

Part I of this article briefly reviews the legal and social context of Dennis and Yates. Parts II and III similarly review Madsen and Schenck in order to show potential parallels to the earlier communist decisions. Part IV further examines both Madsen and Schenck, demonstrating that, from a doctrinal standpoint, they are far removed from the earlier communist cases. Finally, Part V explains how the Court in Madsen and Schenck actually contributed to misconceptions or manipulation of its opinions. Specifically, Part V examines the Madsen and Schenck Courts' approaches to three of the more difficult doctrinal issues facing them--prior restraint ...


Choosing Perspectives In Criminal Procedure, Ronald J. Bacigal Jul 1998

Choosing Perspectives In Criminal Procedure, Ronald J. Bacigal

Law Faculty Publications

In this Article, Professor Bacigal examines the Supreme Court's use of various perspectives in examining the reasonableness of searches and seizures. Although the Supreme Court purports to rely on a consistent method of constitutional analysis when rendering decisions on Fourth Amendment issues, the case law in this area indicates that the Court is influenced sometimes by the citizen's perspective, sometimes by the police officers' perspective, and sometimes by the perspective of the hypothesized reasonable person. After identifying the role of perspectives in a number of seminal Court decisions, Professor Bacigal discusses the benefits and limitations of the Court ...


The Federal Appellate Study At Midpoint, Carl W. Tobias Jul 1998

The Federal Appellate Study At Midpoint, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Where We Stand: An Analysis Of America's Family Law Adjudicatory Systems And The Mandate To Establish Unified Family Courts, Barbara A. Babb Apr 1998

Where We Stand: An Analysis Of America's Family Law Adjudicatory Systems And The Mandate To Establish Unified Family Courts, Barbara A. Babb

All Faculty Scholarship

The volume and scope of family law cases in contemporary American society, as well as their unending nature both individually and systemically, exacerbate the difficulty of their resolution. To address this crisis, the American Bar Association and others have recommended court reform, specifically, the establishment of unified family courts in all jurisdictions. A unified family court is a single forum within which to adjudicate the full range of family law issues, based on the notion that court effectiveness and efficiency increase when the court resolves a family's legal problems in as few appearances as possible. The model is based ...


Juries And Damages: A Commentary, Nancy S. Marder Feb 1998

Juries And Damages: A Commentary, Nancy S. Marder

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Civil Justice Reform Sunset, Carl W. Tobias Jan 1998

Civil Justice Reform Sunset, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

This article uses the Civil Justice Reform Act of 1990 (CJRA) as the backdrop for addressing efforts to increase uniformity, simplicity, and transsubstantivity, and to decrease expense and delay in civil litigation. Professor Tobias discusses both the origin and the implementation of the CJRA. By requiring each federal district court to formulate a civil justice expense and delay reduction plan, the purpose of the CJRA is to decrease expense and delay in civil litigation. Professor Tobias argues that the CIRA has been successful because districts have applied techniques that have saved cost and time and have provided new data that ...


Federal Judicial Selection In A Time Of Divided Government,, Carl W. Tobias Jan 1998

Federal Judicial Selection In A Time Of Divided Government,, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

Congress has authorized 179 active judges for the United States Courts of Appeals and 649 active judges for the United States District Courts. Eighty-two judgeships are now vacant, although the size and complexity of federal caseloads continue to increase. More than thirty openings are considered "judicial emergencies" because they have remained unfilled for eighteen months. The Ninth Circuit, which must resolve the largest docket of the twelve regional appellate courts, currently has nine vacancies on a circuit with twenty eight active judges and for which the Judicial Conference has recommended the creation of nine additional judgeships. The Speedy Trial Act ...


The Breard Case And The Virtues Of Forbearance, John G. Douglass Jan 1998

The Breard Case And The Virtues Of Forbearance, John G. Douglass

Law Faculty Publications

At a time when the scheduled execution of Angel Francisco Breard made Virginia the focus of a groundbreaking controversy over the reach of internationallaw into the domestic criminal process of the United States, law students and faculty at the University of Richmond had the unique opportunity to consider the case along with Philippe Sands, then a Visiting Allen Chair Professor at the University.


Natural Resources And The Ninth Circuit Split, Carl W. Tobias Jan 1998

Natural Resources And The Ninth Circuit Split, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

Congress recently considered some proposals to split the Ninth Circuit, proposals that could have far-reaching effects on the environment, public lands, and natural resources. This Article first looks at some of the recent developments in Congress, particularly the authorization of a national study commission to examine the federal appeals courts. Professor Tobias predicts that the Ninth Circuit will be split during the next decade. He cautions against using political considerations to conduct legislative policymaking with respect to thefederal courts. He suggests that those concerned about the environment gather reliable information and explore alternatives to circuit-splitting. If Congress decides to bifurcate ...


Nearing The End Of Federal Civil Justice Reform In Montana, Carl W. Tobias Jan 1998

Nearing The End Of Federal Civil Justice Reform In Montana, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

In continuing the series of essays which evaluate and document the phenomenon of federal civil justice reform, this essay initially affords an update on recent developments in civil justice reform at the national level and in the United States District Court for the District of Montana (Montana District). The essay emphasizes the conclusion of two major studies that analyze the national reform effort and the submission to Congress of reports and a recommendation, which were premised substantially on these studies, by the Judicial Conference of the United States. The essay also stresses the completion by the Ninth Circuit District Local ...


Judicial Exclusivity And Political Instability, Neal Devins, Louis Fisher Jan 1998

Judicial Exclusivity And Political Instability, Neal Devins, Louis Fisher

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Swearing In Ceremony: Investiture Of Judge Rosemary S. Pooler As A United States Circuit Judge For The Second Circuit, Roger J. Miner '56 Jan 1998

Swearing In Ceremony: Investiture Of Judge Rosemary S. Pooler As A United States Circuit Judge For The Second Circuit, Roger J. Miner '56

Induction Ceremonies and Investitures

No abstract provided.


Developing A Positive Theory Of Decisionmaking On U.S. Courts Of Appeals, Tracey E. George Jan 1998

Developing A Positive Theory Of Decisionmaking On U.S. Courts Of Appeals, Tracey E. George

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

As the decisions of the United States Courts of Appeals become an increasingly important part of American legal discourse, the debate concerning adjudication theories of the circuit courts gain particular relevance. Whereas, to date, the issue has received mostly normative treatment, this Article proceeds systematically and confronts the positive inquiry: how do courts of appeals judges actually decide cases? The Article proposes theoretically, tests empirically, and considers the implications of, a combined attitudinal and strategic model of en banc court of appeals decision making. The results challenge the classicist judges, legal scholars, and practitioners' normative frameworks, and suggest positive theory ...


A Matter Of Power: Structural Federalism And Separation Doctrine In The Present, Frances Howell Rudko Jan 1998

A Matter Of Power: Structural Federalism And Separation Doctrine In The Present, Frances Howell Rudko

Faculty Publications

Public reaction to the 1823 Supreme Court decision in Green v. Biddle prompted John Marshall’s letter to Henry Clay, who had argued the case as amicus curiae for the defendant. The letter is significant because Marshall, who had been a legislator himself, candidly expresses not only his personal dissatisfaction with the congressional assault on the 1823 decision but also the constitutional basis for his opinion. The significance of Marshall’s extrajudicial opinion becomes more apparent when it is considered in the aftermath of the recent tug-of-war between Congress and the Court which culminated in the decision in City of ...


Fostering Balance On The Federal Courts, Carl W. Tobias Jan 1998

Fostering Balance On The Federal Courts, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

During the 1992 presidential election campaign, Governor William Jefferson Clinton pledged to increase the numbers and percentages of women and minorities on the federal bench while appointing judges who are highly intelligent, demonstrate balanced judicial temperament, and exhibit a commitment to enforcing constitutional rights. The record of judicial selection that President Clinton compiled in his first term as Chief Executive shows that he honored these campaign commitments. President Clinton chose federal judges who make the judiciary's composition more closely resemble the American populace and who possess excellent qualifications.

The Clinton Administration named unprecedented numbers and percentages of very capable ...


Dear Justice White, Carl W. Tobias Jan 1998

Dear Justice White, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

Addressing Supreme Court of the United States Justice Justice Byron T. White, Chair of the Commission on Structural Alternatives for the Federal Courts of Appeals, Prof. Tobias offers advice on examining the problems confronting the courts and devising recommendations that address these problems within the Commission's statutory mandate.


Professional Responsibility In Appellate Practice: A View From The Bench, Roger J. Miner '56 Jan 1998

Professional Responsibility In Appellate Practice: A View From The Bench, Roger J. Miner '56

Law Practice

No abstract provided.


The Judicial Conference Report And The Conclusion Of Federal Civil Justice Reform, Carl W. Tobias Jan 1998

The Judicial Conference Report And The Conclusion Of Federal Civil Justice Reform, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

The Civil Justice Reform Act (CJRA) of 1990 instituted a nationwide experiment with procedures for decreasing expense and delay in federal civil litigation. Congress required all ninety-four federal district courts to adopt civil justice expense and delay reduction plans and to apply cost and delay reduction measures for at least four years.Congress correspondingly prescribed considerable evaluation of the experimentation which the federal districts undertook. The 1990 legislation mandated that each court annually assess the efficacy of the procedures which the district employed. Moreover, Congress required that an “independent organization with expertise in the area of Federal court management” conduct ...


Historical Water Use And The Protection Of Vested Rights: A Challenge For Colorado Water Law, James N. Corbridge, Jr. Jan 1998

Historical Water Use And The Protection Of Vested Rights: A Challenge For Colorado Water Law, James N. Corbridge, Jr.

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Corporate Director's Duty Of Oversight, Mark J. Loewenstein Jan 1998

The Corporate Director's Duty Of Oversight, Mark J. Loewenstein

Articles

No abstract provided.


Brandeis, Progressivism, And Commercial Law: Rethinking Benedict V. Ratner, Edward J. Janger Jan 1998

Brandeis, Progressivism, And Commercial Law: Rethinking Benedict V. Ratner, Edward J. Janger

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Catch Me If You Can! Resolving The Ethical Tragedies In The Brave New World Of Jury Selection, José F. Anderson Jan 1998

Catch Me If You Can! Resolving The Ethical Tragedies In The Brave New World Of Jury Selection, José F. Anderson

All Faculty Scholarship

Since the Supreme Court's opinion in Batson v. Kentucky, the rules and tools available to lawyers for selecting juries have changed dramatically from what they had been for decades in American courtrooms. The Court's well intentioned effort in Batson to attempt to eliminate racial discrimination from the process of jury selection set in motion a series of modifications in lawyer decision making which have changed how lawyers fill the jury box. Prior to Batson, the sacrosanct tool known as the peremptory challenge had been virtually unassailable as a jury selection weapon. Abuses by prosecutors, particularly in the southern ...


Sovereign Indignity? Values, Borders And The Internet: A Case Study, Eric Easton Jan 1998

Sovereign Indignity? Values, Borders And The Internet: A Case Study, Eric Easton

All Faculty Scholarship

This article focuses on the publication ban issued by a Canadian court in a notorious murder trial, and the popular reaction to the publication ban, as a case study of the new global communications environment. Part I reconstructs the factual circumstances that provoked the ban, as well as the responses of the media, the legal establishment, and the public. Part II examines the ban itself, the constitutional challenge mounted by the media, and the landmark Dagenais decision. Part III reflects on the meaning of the entire episode for law, journalism, and national sovereignty.

The Dagenais decision demonstrates the continued independence ...


Peremptory Pragmatism: Religion And The Administration Of The Batson Rule, A. C. Johnstone Jan 1998

Peremptory Pragmatism: Religion And The Administration Of The Batson Rule, A. C. Johnstone

Faculty Law Review Articles

This article argues that religion-based peremptory challenges, while avoiding substantial administrative and privacy costs, allow litigants to strike potentially biased jurors and thus vindicates the Constitution's guarantee of a trial by an impartial jury. Part I explains the pragmatic value of the peremptory challenge and how courts accommodate the peremptory challenge under equal protection principles as applied to race, sex, and other personal characteristics. Part II describes the Minnesota Supreme Court's refusal to extend Batson to religion in State v. Davis, and other courts' approaches to the religion question before and after the Supreme Court denied certiorari to ...


Civil Justice Reform Symposium: Introduction, James F. Hogg Jan 1998

Civil Justice Reform Symposium: Introduction, James F. Hogg

Faculty Scholarship

Many people in the United States are not happy about the way in which litigation proceeds. In a country sometimes thought to be overpopulated with lawyers, either one party or both parties in a significant percentage of civil cases apparently cannot afford, or decline to retain, legal counsel. Financing for legal aid seems to be less than adequate, pro bono services are helping to some extent, but the administration of civil justice is in danger of sinking in the swamp of pro se ("do-it-yourself') litigation. The articles in this symposium discuss ideas for reform, such as introductory resources directed at ...


Who's Responsible? Employer Liability For Supervisors' Hostile-Environment Sexual Harassment: An Analysis Of Faragher V. City Of Boca Raton, Barbara J. Fick Jan 1998

Who's Responsible? Employer Liability For Supervisors' Hostile-Environment Sexual Harassment: An Analysis Of Faragher V. City Of Boca Raton, Barbara J. Fick

Journal Articles

This article previews the Supreme Court case Faragher v. City of Boca Raton, 524 U.S. 775 (1998). The author expected the Court to address the issue of under what circumstances an employer is liabile under title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 for a supervisor's sexual harassement that creates a hostile work environment.


An Open Courtroom: Should Cameras Be Permitted In New York State Courts?, Jay C. Carlisle Jan 1998

An Open Courtroom: Should Cameras Be Permitted In New York State Courts?, Jay C. Carlisle

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

On June 30, 1997, the State of New York became one of the nation's few states which does not permit audio-visual coverage of court proceedings. There are several potent arguments in the determination of whether cameras should be permitted in courtroom proceedings. This article will briefly summarize the history of the use of cameras in New York State courts, and then, set out the arguments for and against their use in the state's judicial system. The article is prompted by the book entitled “An Open Courtroom: Cameras in New York Courts” which was published in 1997 by the ...


Contracting Access To The Courts: Myth Or Reality? Bane Or Boon?, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 1998

Contracting Access To The Courts: Myth Or Reality? Bane Or Boon?, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

Many scholars of the dispute resolution system perceive a sea change in attitudes toward adjudication that took place in the mid-1970s. Among the events of the time included the Pound Conference, which put the Chief Justice of the United States and the national judicial establishment on record in favor of at least some refinement, if not restriction, on access to courts. In addition, Chief Justice Burger, the driving force behind the Pound Conference, also used his bully pulpit as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court to promote ADR, particularly court-annexed arbitration. The availability of judicial adjuncts such as court-annexed arbitration ...