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Full-Text Articles in Law

Real Property: 1992 Survey Of Florida Law, Ronald B. Brown Oct 1992

Real Property: 1992 Survey Of Florida Law, Ronald B. Brown

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Corporate Integration, Tax Treaties, And The Division Of The International Tax Base: Principles And Practices., Hugh J. Ault Jun 1992

Corporate Integration, Tax Treaties, And The Division Of The International Tax Base: Principles And Practices., Hugh J. Ault

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In this Article, Professor Ault begins with an examination of the evolution of treaty principles for the allocation of and restrictions on international taxing jurisdiction. He then focuses on how economically based principles dealing with the taxation of international income affect treaty policy and presents the basic structural provisions involving the taxation of foreign income and foreign investors that emerge from domestically enacted or proposed integration systems. The technical aspects of the actual treaty practices that have been implemented with respect to integration systems are then related to the theoretical discussion. Professor Ault concludes with an examination of the implications ...


Reinsurance: Bad Faith Considerations And Insolvency Dilemma, Hui-Ju Hsieh Jan 1992

Reinsurance: Bad Faith Considerations And Insolvency Dilemma, Hui-Ju Hsieh

LLM Theses and Essays

Reinsurance is insurance that an insurance company purchases from another insurance company. The original insurance company is called the reinsured, and the insurance company that is contracted is called the reinsurer. The main purpose of reinsurance is to disperse or spread the risk of loss. The reinsurance relationship is frequently characterized as an exercise of fiduciary responsibility based upon an undertaking of utmost good faith between contracting parties. However, disputes arise; most litigation involving reinsurance has been between reinsurers and persons not party to the reinsurance agreement. This paper’s first major area of discussion is the relationship between the ...


Erisa: Jury Trial Mandated For Benefit Claims Actions, George Lee Flint Jr Jan 1992

Erisa: Jury Trial Mandated For Benefit Claims Actions, George Lee Flint Jr

Faculty Articles

When the United States Supreme Court faces the issue of fashioning a federal common law of ERISA, some district courts have suggested it will decide in favor of the right to a jury trial for benefits-due lawsuits. Legislative history indicates that Congress views the benefits-due lawsuit as contractual, realizing both state and federal courts treat them as contractual under pre-ERISA law, even LMRA, and expressly intended to increase the legal remedies under benefits-due lawsuits. Contractual legal remedies require the right to a jury trial. However, even in the absence of legislative history, constitutional provisions mandate a jury trial. This is ...


Minor Changes: Emancipating Children In Modern Times, Carol Sanger, Eleanor Willemsen Jan 1992

Minor Changes: Emancipating Children In Modern Times, Carol Sanger, Eleanor Willemsen

Faculty Scholarship

Parents and their teenage children don't always get along. At some time during adolescent development, parents may turn into embarrassments and teenagers into domestic terrorists. For most families this is a phase. Adolescence is endured, the child accomplishes some degree of separation from parents, and the transition to adulthood advances.

In some families, however, the period is more like a siege than a phase. Conflict may last longer and be more strifeful, more intense. If the family is incapable or unwilling to resolve the tensions, an intractability may set in. In these cases, domestic tranquility seems attainable only when ...


Minor Changes: Emancipating Children In Modern Times, Carol Sanger, Eleanor Willemsen Jan 1992

Minor Changes: Emancipating Children In Modern Times, Carol Sanger, Eleanor Willemsen

Faculty Scholarship

This Article reports on a mechanism for removing children in conflict with their parents: statutory emancipation, the process by which minors attain legal adulthood before reaching the age of majority. Statutorily emancipated minors can sign binding contracts, own property, keep their earnings, and disobey their parents. Although under eighteen, they are considered as being over the age of majority in most of their dealings with parents and third parties. Thus, while emancipated minors can sign contracts and stay out late, their adult status also means that their parents are no longer responsible for the minors' support. To understand why minors ...