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Series

1991

Judges

Institution
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Articles 1 - 30 of 36

Full-Text Articles in Law

Justice Brennan's Gender Jurisprudence, Rebecca Korzec Oct 1991

Justice Brennan's Gender Jurisprudence, Rebecca Korzec

All Faculty Scholarship

During his thirty-four year tenure on the Supreme Court, Justice William Joseph Brennan, Jr. demonstrated unparalleled sensitivity to the protection of individual rights. Justice Brennan's landmark opinions included Baker v. Carr, Goldberg v. Kelly, and New York Times Co. v. Sullivan. before Brennan, Supreme Court jurisprudence exalted judicial passivity by employing techniques for avoiding constitutional issues, such as abstention, comity, exhaustion of remedies and the political question doctrine.

Against this background, Brennan became an active judicial voice in a series of innovative landmark cases, including decisions requiring federal officials to pay damages for violation of citizens' constitutional rights; authorizing ...


The Georgia Jury And Negligence: The View From The Bench, R. Perry Sentell Jr. Sep 1991

The Georgia Jury And Negligence: The View From The Bench, R. Perry Sentell Jr.

Scholarly Works

It is virtually impossible to think seriously about torts and not think of negligence; it is virtually impossible to think seriously about negligence and not think of the jury. The staples of the common-law negligence system--striking a liability profile, and assessing a causal loss--are the staples of the civil jury province. The historic inevitableness of the fact, however, has never put the matter beyond reflection, scrutiny, reconsideration, challenge, nor controversy. Assuredly, controversy.


Groups In Perspectives, Carol Weisbrod Apr 1991

Groups In Perspectives, Carol Weisbrod

Faculty Articles and Papers

No abstract provided.


The American Jury At Twenty-Five Years, Valerie P. Hans, Neil Vidmar Apr 1991

The American Jury At Twenty-Five Years, Valerie P. Hans, Neil Vidmar

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

The year 1991 marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of the publication of Harry Kalven, Jr. and Hans Zeisel's classic work, The American Jury. Arguably one of the most important books in the field of law and social science, this research monograph began the modrn field of jury studies and deeply influenced contemporary understanding of the jury as an institution.

In this essay we assess the book from the vantage point of a quarter- century. First, we provide a historical backdrop by reviewing the activities of the University of Chicago's Jury Project that led to the publication of The American ...


Judicial Discretion And The 1983 Amendments To The Federal Civil Rules, Carl W. Tobias Jan 1991

Judicial Discretion And The 1983 Amendments To The Federal Civil Rules, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

The first section of this Article briefly describes the developments which created the perception that the federal courts were experiencing a litigation explosion and which ultimately led to the promulgation of the 1983 amendments as one response to the perceived explosion. It also examines the substantive content of those changes, especially how the revisions enlarged federal judicial discretion. The second section evaluates the courts' implementation of the 1983 amendments and finds that this application has adversely affected numerous litigants, particularly civil rights plaintiffs, while providing some benefits, namely fostering more expeditious dispute resolution.

The third section provides suggestions for the ...


More Women Named Federal Judges, Carl W. Tobias Jan 1991

More Women Named Federal Judges, Carl W. Tobias

Law Faculty Publications

The essay initially assesses information pertinent to President Bush's record of appointments to the federal bench during his first three years in office. The prospects for future appointment of women are explored next. Finding these prospects inconclusive, this essay suggests that President Bush continue employing the constructive measures initiated during his administration's third year to name additional women while seriously considering the possibility of instituting even more vigorous efforts to appoint women in the future. Finally, the essay examines why greater numbers of women should be placed on the federal courts and how that goal can be attained.


Making Judicial Nominees Answer Senate Questions, John Paul Jones Jan 1991

Making Judicial Nominees Answer Senate Questions, John Paul Jones

Law Faculty Publications

Prof. Jones discusses the congressional powers to conduct investigations and compel answers from individuals versus the prospective judge's interest in impartiality in the of judicial nomination hearings.


Federal Habeas Review Of New York Convictions: Relieving The Tensions, Roger J. Miner '56 Jan 1991

Federal Habeas Review Of New York Convictions: Relieving The Tensions, Roger J. Miner '56

Bar Associations

No abstract provided.


Justice Harlan And The Bill Of Rights: A Dichotomy In Constitutional Analysis, Roger J. Miner '56 Jan 1991

Justice Harlan And The Bill Of Rights: A Dichotomy In Constitutional Analysis, Roger J. Miner '56

Endowed/named Lectures and Keynote Addresses

No abstract provided.


Preface, The More Things Change, Roger J. Miner '56 Jan 1991

Preface, The More Things Change, Roger J. Miner '56

Federal Court System and Administration

No abstract provided.


Thurgood Marshall And The Administrative State, Jonathan Weinberg Jan 1991

Thurgood Marshall And The Administrative State, Jonathan Weinberg

Law Faculty Research Publications

No abstract provided.


Tribute Dinner Honoring U.S. District Court Judge Howard G. Munson, Roger J. Miner '56 Jan 1991

Tribute Dinner Honoring U.S. District Court Judge Howard G. Munson, Roger J. Miner '56

Judges

No abstract provided.


One Hundred Years Of Influence On National Jurisprudence: Second Circuit Court Of Appeals Decisions Reviewed By The United States Supreme Court, Roger J. Miner '56 Jan 1991

One Hundred Years Of Influence On National Jurisprudence: Second Circuit Court Of Appeals Decisions Reviewed By The United States Supreme Court, Roger J. Miner '56

Endowed/named Lectures and Keynote Addresses

No abstract provided.


Remarks: Appellate Advocacy Program, New York County Lawyers Association, Roger J. Miner '56 Jan 1991

Remarks: Appellate Advocacy Program, New York County Lawyers Association, Roger J. Miner '56

Bar Associations

No abstract provided.


Planning For The Second Century Of The Second Circuit Court Of Appeals: The Report Of The Federal Courts Study Committee, Roger J. Miner '56 Jan 1991

Planning For The Second Century Of The Second Circuit Court Of Appeals: The Report Of The Federal Courts Study Committee, Roger J. Miner '56

Federal Court System and Administration

No abstract provided.


A Profession At Risk, Roger J. Miner '56 Jan 1991

A Profession At Risk, Roger J. Miner '56

Lawyers and the Legal Profession

No abstract provided.


Specialized Courts In Administrative Law, Harold H. Bruff Jan 1991

Specialized Courts In Administrative Law, Harold H. Bruff

Articles

No abstract provided.


Review Of Cardozo: A Study In Reputation, By R. Posner, Richard D. Friedman Jan 1991

Review Of Cardozo: A Study In Reputation, By R. Posner, Richard D. Friedman

Reviews

Judge Richard Posner has written a genial book about one of our greatest judicial icons, Benjamin N. Cardozo.1 He seeks not only to assess the merits of Cardozo's writings, both on and off the bench, but also to measure, and determine the causes of, Cardozo's reputation. The book is an outgrowth of a lecture series,2 and it reveals its origins in at least two ways. First, the book attempts to reach a mixed audience, composed of both lawyers and laypeople, and in this aspect it is very successful. Nonlawyers, I believe, will have little difficulty following ...


Harlan Without Relish. Review Of John Marshall Harlan: Great Dissenter Of The Warren Court, By Tinsley E. Yarbrough, Jethro K. Lieberman Jan 1991

Harlan Without Relish. Review Of John Marshall Harlan: Great Dissenter Of The Warren Court, By Tinsley E. Yarbrough, Jethro K. Lieberman

Other Publications

No abstract provided.


Giving Notice: An Argument For Notification Of Putative Plaintiffs In Complex Litigation, Marjorie A. Silver Jan 1991

Giving Notice: An Argument For Notification Of Putative Plaintiffs In Complex Litigation, Marjorie A. Silver

Scholarly Works

Professor Silver advocates recognition of an inherent judicial power to send or authorize notice of pending litigation to potentially interested persons with unfiled claims. Recognizing such a judicial power is consistent with recent legal developments establishing a role for judges in expediting and managing federal litigation. Although the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure only explicitly provide for notice to potential parties in Rule 23 class action litigation, Professor Silver demonstrates that a more general judicial power to notify putative plaintiffs is consistent with the federal rules and the Constitution. She also shows that the first amendment values support a judicial ...


A Tribute To Peter S. Popovich, James F. Hogg Jan 1991

A Tribute To Peter S. Popovich, James F. Hogg

Faculty Scholarship

A tribute to Peter S. Popovich, Chief Justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court 1989-1990 and William Mitchell College of Law alumni.


Process Of Constitutional Decision Making, Kenneth Ripple Jan 1991

Process Of Constitutional Decision Making, Kenneth Ripple

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


"I Vote This Way Because I'M Wrong": The Supreme Court Justice As Epimenides, John M. Rogers Jan 1991

"I Vote This Way Because I'M Wrong": The Supreme Court Justice As Epimenides, John M. Rogers

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

Possibly the most unsettling phenomenon in the Supreme Court's 1988 term was Justice White's decision to vote contrary to his own exhaustively stated reasoning in Pennsylvania v. Union Gas Co. His unexplained decision to vote against the result of his own analysis lends support to those who argue that law, or at least constitutional law, is fundamentally indeterminate. Proponents of the indeterminacy argument sometimes base their position on the allegedly inescapable inconsistency of decisions made by a multi-member court. There is an answer to the inconsistency argument, but it founders if justices sometimes vote, without explanation, on the ...


Justice William J. Brennan, Jr. - The Moral Force Of His Language, Bennett L. Gershman Jan 1991

Justice William J. Brennan, Jr. - The Moral Force Of His Language, Bennett L. Gershman

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

The enduring strength of Justice William J. Brennan Jr.'s constitutional vision is a tribute to his extraordinary scholarship and powerful logic. His opinions will be studied, cited, and honored for generations for their immense contribution to the constitutional protection of individual rights. But there is a further dimension to his jurisprudence that has always struck me - the moral force of his language. Justice Brennan's eloquent, passionate, and compassionate prose constantly exhorts us to a higher moral plane. To the disadvantaged, the accused, the dissident, and the condemned, Justice Brennan's words are a timeless anthem of sustenance and ...


Judicial Misconduct During Jury Deliberations, Bennett L. Gershman Jan 1991

Judicial Misconduct During Jury Deliberations, Bennett L. Gershman

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

The author considers the two principal types of improper judicial behavior that may occur during the jury deliberation process. Judicial conduct that attempts to place undue pressure on a jury to reach a verdict may include verdict-urging instructions, threats and intimidation, and inquiry into the numerical division of the jury on the merits of the verdict. Judicial participation in private, ex parte communications with jurors may also subvert orderly trial procedure and undermine the impartiality of the jury. Neither kind of judicial conduct may be allowed to compel a verdict from a jury.


In Memoriam -- The Honorable William J. Jameson, J. Martin Burke Jan 1991

In Memoriam -- The Honorable William J. Jameson, J. Martin Burke

Faculty Law Review Articles

This article is a tribute to the Honorable William J. Jameson, long-time Montana judge.


International Law Principles Governing The Extraterritorial Application Of Criminal Law, Christopher L. Blakesley Jan 1991

International Law Principles Governing The Extraterritorial Application Of Criminal Law, Christopher L. Blakesley

Scholarly Works

In this piece Professor Blakesley provides remarks on the differences and similarities between Germany and the United States on international principles of jurisdiction over extraterritorial crime.


Bats And Owls And The Insane Moon: The Search For The Republic's Unwritten Constitution, E. F. Roberts Jan 1991

Bats And Owls And The Insane Moon: The Search For The Republic's Unwritten Constitution, E. F. Roberts

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Justice Brennan And The First Amendment Minefield: In Respectful Appreciation, Ralph Michael Stein Jan 1991

Justice Brennan And The First Amendment Minefield: In Respectful Appreciation, Ralph Michael Stein

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

It is a special privilege, and a personal joy, for me to have the opportunity to contribute a piece honoring such a revered figure. I make no claim to scholarly objectivity. My premise is simple: William J. Brennan has given us a legacy of first amendment decisions, concurrences, and dissents that reflect great honor on the jurist. My portion of this Festschrift provides selected examples of Justice Brennan's contribution, and concludes by thanking him for serving, through his opinions, as a mentor for me throughout my career as a teacher of constitutional law.


Judge (A Tribute To Judge Frank M. Coffin), J. Peter Byrne Jan 1991

Judge (A Tribute To Judge Frank M. Coffin), J. Peter Byrne

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Becoming Judge Coffin's law clerk must be the most fortunate of conclusions to a legal education. His judicial craftsmanship sets a standard for thoughtful professionalism that a young lawyer can never outgrow. In those salt-scented and book-lined chambers, briefs were painstakingly and critically read, precedents and statutes honestly interpreted and challenged to yield just results, opinions written and rewritten to convey the significance of a small distinction or the applicability of a large principle.