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Articles 1 - 13 of 13

Full-Text Articles in Law

Book Review: Deforming Tort Reform, Joseph A. Page Jan 1990

Book Review: Deforming Tort Reform, Joseph A. Page

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The storms buffeting the tort system over the past two decades have come in three distinct waves. In the late 1960s, steep increases in the insurance costs incurred by health care providers protecting against negligence claims by patients triggered what came to be known as the "medical malpractice crisis." In the mid-1970s, manufacturers whose liability insurance premiums suddenly soared raised obstreperous complaints that called public attention to the existence of a "product liability crisis." Finally, other groups whose activities created risks exposing them to lawsuits found that their liability insurance rates had also risen precipitously. A full-blown "torts crisis" was ...


Our Rights And Obligations To Future Generations For The Environment, Edith Brown Weiss Jan 1990

Our Rights And Obligations To Future Generations For The Environment, Edith Brown Weiss

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

We read every day about the desecration of our environment and the mismanagement of our natural resources. We have always had the capacity to wreck the environment on a small or even regional scale. Centuries of irrigation without adequate drainage in ancient times converted large areas of the fertile Tigris-Euphrates valley into barren desert. What is new is that we now have the power to change our global environment irreversibly, with profoundly damaging effects on the robustness and integrity of the planet and the heritage that we pass to future generations.


Pure Politics, Girardeau A. Spann Jan 1990

Pure Politics, Girardeau A. Spann

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The present Supreme Court has been noticeably unreceptive to legal claims asserted by racial minorities. Although it is always possible to articulate nonracial motives for the Court's civil rights decisions, the popular perception is that a politically conservative majority wishing to cut back on the protection minority interests receive at majority expense now dominates the Supreme Court. In reviewing the work of the Court during its 1988 Term, The United States Law Week reported that "[a] series of civil rights decisions by a conservative majority of the U.S. Supreme Court making it easier to challenge affirmative action programs ...


Progressive And Conservative Constitutionalism, Robin West Jan 1990

Progressive And Conservative Constitutionalism, Robin West

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

American constitutional law in general, and fourteenth amendment jurisprudence in particular, is in a state of profound transformation. The "liberal-legalist" and purportedly politically neutral understanding of constitutional guarantees that dominated constitutional law and theory during the fifties, sixties, and seventies, is waning, both in the courts and in the academy. What is beginning to replace liberal legalism in the academy, and what has clearly replaced it on the Supreme Court, is a very different conception - a new paradigm - of the role of constitutionalism, constitutional adjudication, and constitutional guarantees in a democratic state. Unlike the liberal-legal paradigm it is replacing, the ...


Equality Theory, Marital Rape, And The Promise Of The Fourteenth Amendment, Robin West Jan 1990

Equality Theory, Marital Rape, And The Promise Of The Fourteenth Amendment, Robin West

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

During the 1980s a handful of state judges either held or opined in dicta what must be incontrovertible to the feminist community, as well as to most progressive legal advocates and academics: the so-called marital rape exemption, whether statutory or common law in origin, constitutes a denial of a married woman's constitutional right to equal protection under the law. Indeed, a more obvious denial of equal protection is difficult to imagine: the marital rape exemption denies married women protection against violent crime solely on the basis of gender and marital status. What possibly could be less rational than a ...


The Internal And External Analysis Of Concepts, Randy E. Barnett Jan 1990

The Internal And External Analysis Of Concepts, Randy E. Barnett

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

In Abstract Right and the Possibility of a Nondistributive Conception of Contract: Hegel and Contemporary Contract Theory, Peter Benson criticizes the authors presentation of a consent theory of contract, in part, on the ground that it "refers only to the empirical facts of the requirements of human needs and fulfillment. Like [Charles] Fried's [account], his conception of the consensual basis of a contract does not preserve the required standpoint of abstraction. " On this basis Professor Benson concludes that the author's approach fails to "provide an adequate elucidation of a nondistributive conception of contract.

By explaining contractual obligation as ...


The Future Of District Of Columbia Home Rule, Philip G. Schrag Jan 1990

The Future Of District Of Columbia Home Rule, Philip G. Schrag

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This article begins by briefly reviewing the recent historical development of home rule. Next, it explores the ways in which the people of the District might obtain a greater voice in the national legislature and more genuine home rule. Finally, it suggests that the District's citizens may have to make a political choice, which they have until now avoided, between seeking gradual improvements in their political rights and pressing strongly for statehood.


The Virtues Of Redundancy In Legal Thought, Randy E. Barnett Jan 1990

The Virtues Of Redundancy In Legal Thought, Randy E. Barnett

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Redundancy has a bad reputation among legal intellectuals. When someone says, for example, that the ninth and tenth amendments are redundant, we can be pretty sure that this person attaches little importance to these constitutional provisions. Listen to one of the definitions of redundant provided by the Oxford English Dictionary: "superabundant, superfluous, excessive."' In this essay, the author proposes that legal theorists pay serious attention to the concept of redundancy used by engineers. He explains how redundancy--in this special sense--is essential to any intellectual enterprise in which we try to reach action-guiding conclusions, including the enterprise of law. The author ...


The Meaning Of Equality And The Interpretive Turn, Robin West Jan 1990

The Meaning Of Equality And The Interpretive Turn, Robin West

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The turn to hermeneutics and interpretation in contemporary legal theory has contributed at least two central ideas to modern jurisprudential thought: first, that the "meaning" of a text is invariably indeterminate -- what might be called the indeterminacy claim -- and second, that the unavoidably malleable essence of texts -- their essential inessentiality -- entails that interpreting a text is a necessary part of the process of creating the text's meaning. These insights have generated both considerable angst, and considerable excitement among traditional constitutional scholars, primarily because at least on first blush these two claims seem to inescapably imply a third: that the ...


A Decade Of A Maturing Epidemic: An Assessment And Directions For Future Public Policy, Lawrence O. Gostin Jan 1990

A Decade Of A Maturing Epidemic: An Assessment And Directions For Future Public Policy, Lawrence O. Gostin

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The author's goal in this article, is not merely to propose public health strategies for the future, but also to examine why government has been so slow, so equivocal, in its public health response to the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. He argues that there has been a fundamental ambivalence in perceptions of the epidemic. For some, AIDS is perceived as a disease, with sympathy for sufferers. Once AIDS is viewed as a disease, like other catastrophic diseases, it follows that public policy will be based upon science and epidemiology--health education, research and treatment.

For others, AIDS is ...


Virtues And Voices, Lawrence B. Solum Jan 1990

Virtues And Voices, Lawrence B. Solum

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This essay explores two ideas that have recently played an important role in discourse about the American constitutional order. The first idea has emerged from the revival of civic republicanism. The republican revival has focused our attention on the classical conception of civic virtue. Our basic social arrangements ought to nourish a citizenry with the characteristics of mind and will that promote human flourishing. The second idea, expressed in critical race theory and feminist jurisprudence, is that we have an obligation as a society and as scholars to attend to excluded voices. The juxtaposition of these two themes offers an ...


Long Arms And Chemical Arms: Extraterritoriality And The Draft Chemical Weapons Convention, David A. Koplow Jan 1990

Long Arms And Chemical Arms: Extraterritoriality And The Draft Chemical Weapons Convention, David A. Koplow

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Chemical warfare has long been considered a particularly loathsome form of combat. The specter of unprotected soldiers and nearby noncombatants incapacitated or killed within moments by invisible, silent, odorless vapors discharged by a far-distant enemy has terrified many, and has also energized repeated international attempts to prohibit, or at least to moderate, these applications of deadly science.


Green Property, J. Peter Byrne Jan 1990

Green Property, J. Peter Byrne

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This essay begins an effort to imagine legal principles that further ecological values and to criticize extant principles that embody the antithetical values of exploitation and consumption. I will focus on the transformation of property law inherent in adopting an environmentally sustainable land use program.