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Series

1990

Supreme Court of the United States

Institution
Keyword
Publication

Articles 1 - 27 of 27

Full-Text Articles in Law

Rent Appropriation And The Labor Law Doctrine Of Successorship, Keith N. Hylton Nov 1990

Rent Appropriation And The Labor Law Doctrine Of Successorship, Keith N. Hylton

Faculty Scholarship

When there is a change of corporate control in a business enterprise a question arises as to whether the new employer should be bound by the predecessor's collective bargaining relationship with the union representing the predecessor's employees. This is known as the successorship problem in labor law.' Successorship doctrine is complex and controversial. Several commentators have attempted to reconcile Supreme Court decisions and to ascertain the assumptions underlying the Court's opinions in this area.2 This Article does not attempt to do this, although paradoxically, the arguments presented may lead to reconciliation of many of the Supreme Court's decisions relating to …


Administrative Failure And Local Democracy: The Politics Of Deshaney, Jack M. Beermann Nov 1990

Administrative Failure And Local Democracy: The Politics Of Deshaney, Jack M. Beermann

Faculty Scholarship

This Essay is an effort to construct a normative basis for a constitutional theory to resist the Supreme Court's recent decision in DeShaney v. Winnebago County Department of Social Services.1 In DeShaney, the Court decided that a local social service worker's failure to prevent child abuse did not violate the due process clause of the fourteenth amendment even though the social worker "had reason to believe" the abuse was occurring. 2 Chief Justice Rehnquist's opinion for the Court held that government inaction cannot violate due process unless the state has custody of the victim, 3 thus settling a controversial …


A Rational Choice Theory Of Supreme Court Statutory Decisions With Applications To The State Farm And Grove City Cases, Rafael Gely, Pablo T. Spiller Oct 1990

A Rational Choice Theory Of Supreme Court Statutory Decisions With Applications To The State Farm And Grove City Cases, Rafael Gely, Pablo T. Spiller

Faculty Publications

In this article we follow the recent developments of the modern theory of administrative agencies, by developing a rational choice theory of the Supreme Court. Our framework combines two of the main characteristics of this literature: namely, the rational choice modeling strategy with the notion that institutions matter in the design of public policy. We differ basically by modeling the Supreme Court as a self-interested, ideologically motivated institution, making its decisions subject not to the traditional legal rules of precedent, but to the constraints arising from the political interests of other institutions of government-namely, Congress and the President.


A Judicial Postscript On The Church-State Debates Of 1989: How Porous The Wall, How Civil The State?, William W. Van Alstyne Oct 1990

A Judicial Postscript On The Church-State Debates Of 1989: How Porous The Wall, How Civil The State?, William W. Van Alstyne

Faculty Publications

This work is a continuation of the debate regarding the Establishment Clause. The focus lies with Justice O’Connor’s concurrence in County of Allegheny v. ACLU and how this opinion harkens back to a concept shared by Jefferson and Madison, that the establishment clause is designed to prevent government favoritism.


Academic Freedom And The First Amendment In The Supreme Court Of The United States: An Unhurried Historical Review, William W. Van Alstyne Jul 1990

Academic Freedom And The First Amendment In The Supreme Court Of The United States: An Unhurried Historical Review, William W. Van Alstyne

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Admission Of Government Fact Findings Under Federal Rule Of Evidence 803(8)(C): Limiting The Dangers Of Unreliable Hearsay, Steven P. Grossman, Stephen J. Shapiro Apr 1990

The Admission Of Government Fact Findings Under Federal Rule Of Evidence 803(8)(C): Limiting The Dangers Of Unreliable Hearsay, Steven P. Grossman, Stephen J. Shapiro

All Faculty Scholarship

Federal Rule of Evidence 803(8)(C), an exception to the rule against admission of hearsay, permits introduction of public records or reports containing the fact findings of the reporter without requiring the reporter to appear at trial. These fact findings can be based upon the reporter's own observations and calculations or information imparted to the reporter from sources having no connection to any public agency whatsoever. Rule 803(8)(C) has also been used as the vehicle for presenting juries with fact findings from hearings conducted by public officials. The rule would seem to allow these fact findings even though the opponent had …


The Constitutional Catechism Of Antonin Scalia, George Kannar Apr 1990

The Constitutional Catechism Of Antonin Scalia, George Kannar

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


The Conflict Concerning Expert Witness And Legal Conclusions, Charles W. Ehrhardt Apr 1990

The Conflict Concerning Expert Witness And Legal Conclusions, Charles W. Ehrhardt

Scholarly Publications

No abstract provided.


Indeterminacy And Incommensurability In Constitutional Law, Steven L. Winter Jan 1990

Indeterminacy And Incommensurability In Constitutional Law, Steven L. Winter

Law Faculty Research Publications

Progressive constitutional scholarship has yet fully to confront the implications of the conservative shift in constitutional law. Liberal critics continue to seek governing constitutional theories with which to constrain decisionmaking by judges of a notably different mind. Other, more radical scholars employ the indeterminacy and "law is politics" critiques in a more open attempt at displacement. Neither approach is viable, however. Each presumes the primacy of the autonomous, self-directing subject; each resists recognition of the situated nature of all human endeavor. This essay adopts the alternative strategy: exploring the implications of situatedness as they apply to the development, practice, and …


Religious Free Speech Rights Of Students In Public Schools: The Educator's Dilemma, Rosalie Levinson Jan 1990

Religious Free Speech Rights Of Students In Public Schools: The Educator's Dilemma, Rosalie Levinson

Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The October 1989 Supreme Court Term And Antitrust: Power, Access, And Legitimacy, Stephen Calkins Jan 1990

The October 1989 Supreme Court Term And Antitrust: Power, Access, And Legitimacy, Stephen Calkins

Law Faculty Research Publications

No abstract provided.


Unrightable Wrongs: The Rehnquist Court, Civil Rights, And An Elegy For Dreams, D. Marvin Jones Jan 1990

Unrightable Wrongs: The Rehnquist Court, Civil Rights, And An Elegy For Dreams, D. Marvin Jones

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Supreme Court In Politics., Terrance Sandalow Jan 1990

The Supreme Court In Politics., Terrance Sandalow

Reviews

Despite all that has been written about the bitter struggle initiated by President Reagan's nomination of Robert Bork to a seat on the Supreme Court, its most remarkable feature, that it was waged over a judicial appointment, has drawn relatively little comment. Two hundred years after the Philadelphia Convention, Hamilton's "least dangerous" branch - least dangerous because it would have "no influence over either the sword or the purse, no direction either of the strength or the wealth of the society, and can take no active resolution whatever"'-had come to occupy so important a place in the nation's political life …


Political Pressure And Judging In Constitutional Cases, Robert F. Nagel Jan 1990

Political Pressure And Judging In Constitutional Cases, Robert F. Nagel

Publications

No abstract provided.


The Third Best Choice: An Essay On Law And History, Theodore Y. Blumoff Jan 1990

The Third Best Choice: An Essay On Law And History, Theodore Y. Blumoff

Articles

The thesis of this Essay is that our use of history is as essential and unavoidable as conclusive answers are irretrievable. Irretrievability exists whether the historical reality sought results from a survey of traditional historical materials in an effort to recapture original understanding, or from a common-law effort to discover the Court's own history of an issue. In either case, however, the need to attempt to recover historical truths is perceived as essential. I subscribe, for the most part, to the contextualist premise that we cannot recover sufficient historical data on issues that matter to make history determinate in the …


Justice Scalia And The Elusive Idea Of Discrimination Against Interstate Commerce, Richard B. Collins Jan 1990

Justice Scalia And The Elusive Idea Of Discrimination Against Interstate Commerce, Richard B. Collins

Publications

No abstract provided.


Advice, Consent, And Influence, Robert F. Nagel Jan 1990

Advice, Consent, And Influence, Robert F. Nagel

Publications

No abstract provided.


Meeting The Enemy, Robert F. Nagel Jan 1990

Meeting The Enemy, Robert F. Nagel

Publications

No abstract provided.


Appointment Controversies And The Supreme Court, Stephen Wermiel Jan 1990

Appointment Controversies And The Supreme Court, Stephen Wermiel

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

No abstract provided.


Maintaining Consistency In The Law Of The Large Circuit: The Origins And Operation Of The Ninth Circuit's Limited En Banc Court, Arthur D. Hellman Jan 1990

Maintaining Consistency In The Law Of The Large Circuit: The Origins And Operation Of The Ninth Circuit's Limited En Banc Court, Arthur D. Hellman

Book Chapters

Once again, Congress is considering legislation to divide the largest of the federal judicial circuits, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. The Ninth Circuit extends over nine western states, including California, and it has 29 active judges, almost twice the number of the next-largest circuit. Much of the debate over proposals for restructuring focuses on a feature unique to the Ninth Circuit, the limited en banc court (LEBC). In all of the other circuits, when the court of appeals grants rehearing en banc, the case is heard by all active judges. In the Ninth Circuit, the en banc court is …


Constitutionalizing The 'Right To Die', Thomas Wm. Mayo Jan 1990

Constitutionalizing The 'Right To Die', Thomas Wm. Mayo

Faculty Journal Articles and Book Chapters

Following the Supreme Court’s unprecedented acceptance of three abortion cases, and for the first time a case involving the withdrawal of life-sustaining medical treatment in the upcoming 1989 Term, this article addresses the so-called right to die. Specifically, as in Cruzan v. Director, Missouri Department of Health, whether the federal constitutional right of privacy extends to decisions, made on behalf of permanently unconscious patients, to have life-sustaining medical treatment discontinued and, if so, whether a state’s interest in the sanctity of life can override the patient’s privacy right? This article argues that on doctrinal as well as policy grounds, no …


Remembering The 'Old World' Of Criminal Procedure: A Reply To Professor Grano, Yale Kamisar Jan 1990

Remembering The 'Old World' Of Criminal Procedure: A Reply To Professor Grano, Yale Kamisar

Articles

When I graduated from high school in 1961, the "old world" of criminal procedure still existed, albeit in its waning days; when I graduated from law school in 1968, circa the time most of today's first-year law students were arriving on the scene, the "new world" had fully dislodged the old. Indeed, the force of the new world's revolutionary impetus already had crested. Some of the change that the criminal procedure revolution effected was for the better, but much of it, at least as some of us see it, was decidedly for the worse. My students, however, cannot make the …


Gideon V. Wainwright A Quarter-Century Later, Yale Kamisar Jan 1990

Gideon V. Wainwright A Quarter-Century Later, Yale Kamisar

Articles

In a brief working paper sent to all conference participants, Professor Burt Neuborne suggested that we might consider several themes, among them "Gideon Celebrated," "Gideon Fulfilled," and "Gideon Betrayed." I think these are useful headings.


Afterword To Chicago-Kent Law Review, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 1990

Afterword To Chicago-Kent Law Review, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Articles

A unifying theme of this Symposium is as old and enduring as the common law: when and how can a well-established, successful adjudicative institution be adapted to meet the demands of new and substantially different situations? There have been splendid triumphs of transference, such as Lord Mansfield's appropriation of the law merchant in the eighteenth century as a major building block of modem commercial law. There have also been embarrassing failures, like the abortive effort to transport American labor law concepts en masse into the alien British environment of the early 1970s. The common question confronting the participants in this …


Pure Politics, Girardeau A. Spann Jan 1990

Pure Politics, Girardeau A. Spann

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The present Supreme Court has been noticeably unreceptive to legal claims asserted by racial minorities. Although it is always possible to articulate nonracial motives for the Court's civil rights decisions, the popular perception is that a politically conservative majority wishing to cut back on the protection minority interests receive at majority expense now dominates the Supreme Court. In reviewing the work of the Court during its 1988 Term, The United States Law Week reported that "[a] series of civil rights decisions by a conservative majority of the U.S. Supreme Court making it easier to challenge affirmative action programs and more …


Justice Harlan's Conservatism And Altenative Possibilities, Kent Greenawalt Jan 1990

Justice Harlan's Conservatism And Altenative Possibilities, Kent Greenawalt

Faculty Scholarship

Bruce Ackerman and Charles Fried's rich essays address the subject of Justice Harlan as a conservative. One who comes to this topic has in mind questions like: Was Justice Harlan a conservative? If so, what kind of a conservative was he? How did his judicial actions exemplify a conservative approach? Most importantly, is his conservatism an appealing model for modern judicial practice?

Professors Ackerman and Fried's slices on this topic reflect their own casts of mind and philosophies of judging. Fried looks at a broad range of Justice Harlan's opinions and sets them against particular conservative qualities that Fried commends. …


Supreme Court, Plain Meaning, And The Changed Rules Of Evidence, Randolph N. Jonakait Jan 1990

Supreme Court, Plain Meaning, And The Changed Rules Of Evidence, Randolph N. Jonakait

Articles & Chapters

No abstract provided.